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Hello everyone! I've been lurking on these boards for a little while and I've finally decided to take the plunge and become a vegetarian. I'm very happy about this decision; however, I am in need of some advice. I have leaky gut syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome so basically I have a LOT of digestive issues. I'm taking enzymes, probiotics, and unfortunately laxatives (miralax). I'm also very underweight, I dont have an ED or anything like that just problems digesting my food. I'm frequently bloated and have indigestion as well.<br><br><br><br>
Do you think switching to a vegetarian diet will help my digestive complaints or worsen them? My hollistic doctor said that I must try eating beans and lentils because I barely have any protien in my diet as it is. I'm worried that eating beans will make my bloating even worse! I have a pretty good diet, except I eat very little because I'm never hungry due to bloating, gas, and indigestion.<br><br><br><br>
I love to eat but I feel horrible afterwards.....i keep loosing weight and i really cant afford to do that any more...<br><br><br><br>
ANY SUGESTIONS WOULD BE APPRECIATED!
 

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May I ask , have you ever been tested for celiacs disease?<br><br>
Otherwise known as Sprue.<br><br><br><br>
IBS person here and as long as I avoid certain foods like wheats for the most part sweetners and very heavy fatty stuff I'm A OK.<br><br>
Anyway if you have not been tested it is a worthwhile test to take, while its not all that common celiacs people often have symptoms that mimic IBS or chrones and tend to not be able to digest thier food well and have lots of digestive issues and gastric issues
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>SugarBlue27</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
....Do you think switching to a vegetarian diet will help my digestive complaints or worsen them? My hollistic doctor said that I must try eating beans and lentils because I barely have any protien in my diet as it is. I'm worried that eating beans will make my bloating even worse! I have a pretty good diet, except I eat very little because I'm never hungry due to bloating, gas, and indigestion.<br><br><br><br>
I love to eat but I feel horrible afterwards.....i keep loosing weight and i really cant afford to do that any more...<br><br><br><br>
ANY SUGESTIONS WOULD BE APPRECIATED!</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Most probably switching to veg*n diet won't worsen your digestive complaints, but going on a bean rich diet doesn't seem to be a good idea, especially as you're already suffering from bloating / gas. How come you think you're not eating enough protein? You think you have a pretty good diet and then you don't need extra protein, what you need is eating enough. Maybe taking extra snacks could help to solve your problem.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hi.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hi:"><br><br><br><br>
what are the symptoms of leaky gut syndrome? i have a friend who's been sick for a while and her doctors can't figure out what's wrong. they thought it was colitis but she tested ok there, so they thought it was celiac but she doesn't think it is. she's going for more tests today and tomorrow, but meanwhile we've all been brainstorming for other things for them to test for. i forgot about leaky gut..<br><br><br><br><br><br>
also want to point out that if you have a problem with gas and bloating you might want to avoid soy products. nothing bloats me up like a veggieburger or yves ground <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> though, strangely enough, tofu doesn't seem to bother me. i guess it's less processed.<br><br><br><br>
i'm not sure how you'll get enough protein without much soy or beans. there are some kinds of beans that don't cause gas and bloating as much as others but i can't think of what they are, maybe post a question in the food forums, i'm sure someone here will know. also if you buy them raw and cook them yourself it's better because you can soak them longer, i heard soaking them can help. i've had good luck with chickpeas myself. if you're not avoiding wheat make sure you get lots of whole grains (brown rice is fairly high in protein as far as grains go), and i guess nuts and nut butters.<br><br>
there are vegan protein powders you can use, most are soy but there are some that are rice or pea based. the protein content is a lot lower in those so you'd have to use more of it to get your daily amount, but you can even add them to non-bake desserts and such and can't taste it that way.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
hope that helps, and grats on deciding to go veg
 

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Here's some information on the leaky gut syndrome:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/autism/gut.htm" target="_blank">http://osiris.sunderland.ac.uk/autism/gut.htm</a><br><br><a href="http://www.afpafitness.com/articles/LEAKGUT4.HTM" target="_blank">http://www.afpafitness.com/articles/LEAKGUT4.HTM</a><br><br><br><br>
The 2nd link has more detailed information.
 

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Just two quick pointers on protein:<br><br><br><br>
If you're not allergic to nuts, peanut butter (or other nut butters) are an easy way to get some extra protein into your diet. Good old-fashioned peanut butter on celery is a staple in my diet. Or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for snack. Substitute other nut butters according to taste.<br><br><br><br>
If you want to add beans to your diet, I suggest starting with the lentil. I have a history of IBS (although it has not been an issue for a while), and I find lentils to be the easiest bean to digest. A few pointers: if you buy lentils in a can (to throw on a salad or something), make sure you rinse them thoroughly. (This goes for all beans in cans). As you rinse them, you will notice bubbles forming on them - keep rinsing until the bubbles go away. What you're doing is rinsing away a lot of the excess-gas-causing stuff. The remaining beans-sans-bubbles will cause a lot less gas. Rinse, rinse, rinse!<br><br><br><br>
Some people will argue that canned beans are not the best choice (some people prefer 'fresher' foods) but I think they're great for people who have trouble digesting beans. The beans have been 'digesting' a bit as they've been sitting in the liquids in the can, and you can rinse that stuff away, so it doesn't end up in your tummy.<br><br><br><br>
If you cook your own lentils, get them to a good rolling boil, and you will notice foam forming on the top of the water. Skim that off. (This will take several skimmings.) Keep 'em boiling, and keep skimming. Again, that's a lot of the gas being released from the beans, and if you get that out of the pot, it won't end up in your tummy. Just one word of advice - don't add lots of herbs and spices until after you skim, since they tend to float, and you'll end up skimming them right out of the pot too. Of course, you don't have to get every last bit of foam, but you'll be able to remove a good deal of it, which should make the beans cause less gas.<br><br><br><br>
If you have the time, an even better step is to then rinse your beans after you cook them (just like with the canned beans.) The more of the bubbly stuff you get rid of, the better. So, for instance, if you're making soup, make the brothy stuff in one pot, and cook the lentils in another. Skim the lentils, rinse them, and then throw them in the soup.<br><br><br><br>
And now I take all that back - because I usually don't do all of that for my lentils. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I've built up a tolerance to them over time, and I find I don't need to skim and rinse like I used too. But if I were going to use any bean from a can (including lentils) or cook any bean (except lentils), I would certainly go through all of that to get them as gas-free as possible.<br><br><br><br>
What to do with lentils anyway? Look up some basic dal recipes, and you'll get the idea. They don't have to be anything fancy. You could even warm up some lentils (from a can, rinsed as above), and dump salsa on them or something really easy like that. Or saute some onions, add your rinsed can lentils, and heat them up, mixed with curry powder. My personal favorite is to eat them mixed in with rice as a hearty meal. I cook a batch of lentil soup, and then add enough rice to soak up most of the broth, and I end up with a nice 'rice dish' sort of thing - I freeze it in single-serve containers and take it for lunch to work.<br><br><br><br>
There are also red lentils, green lentils, and these funny looking itty-bitty orange lentils to try. Then there are recipes for lentil 'meat'loaf and other things like that, which you can probably find in veggie cookbooks or by searching the net.<br><br><br><br>
I would recommend that, at first, you limit yourself to one or two servings of lentils (and/or other gas-causing foods) per day to start, so you don't end up with a really bad flare-up of IBS. You might be able to gradually increase your servings per day. Then again, you might hit a wall where you say that, e.g., three servings is your daily limit. Just 'follow your gut' on that.<br><br><br><br>
Also, as you probably know, certain veggies like onions, mushrooms, cucumbers, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, etc., create more gas than other veggies. So be careful about how much of those you eat at a sitting too. I love onions, for example, and I know that if I have sauteed onions with a meal, then I better not eat anything else that's highly likely to cause gas. Give your digestive system a break.<br><br><br><br>
Also, as mentioned above, be wary of soy. Try a bit here and there, but don't go overboard. I still can't tolerate much soy - that's one thing that can cause serious digestive distress for me.<br><br><br><br>
I hope all of that helps - and let us know if you have any questions or need more info - we'll try our best to point you in the right direction. When I was first diagnosed with IBS about 1.5 years ago, my doc gave me a list of foods to 'avoid', and it basically listed all veggies. I said to heck with that, and went vegan about a week later. Now all I eat is plants and plant-based foods. Now, mine is probably not a typical case, because I didn't have really bad IBS, but it was annoying, I can tell you that much. My point is, you might be able to alter your diet over time. Just take it slow, and pay attention to how your body reacts to certain things. Good luck.
 

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And something else I just thought of:<br><br><br><br>
Someone mentioned soaking beans, above. Lentils don't need a soaking. But if you cook any other beans, you usually soak them overnight first. Make sure you discard the soaking water, and rinse the beans *thoroughly* before you cook them. Some recipes will tell you to soak the beans in broth, and then cook them in that broth. Don't do that. Soak and rinse, and just use the broth in the cooking phase. And, as with lentils, if you see any foam forming, skim it off.<br><br><br><br>
Ok. I'll shut up now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>piratebean</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
... <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
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Thanks for the information on beans, especially on lentils. I think because lentils are very small you can get lots of the undigestible sugars out of them. Maybe for someone with bloating problems discarding the water in which the lentils were boiled might be a good idea. Normally I wouldn't do so because you also loose all the electrolytes like magnesium, potassium, and so on.<br><br>
Celery might be a problem for people with an allergic condition.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have been tested for celiac disease and gluten intolerance and I do not have either. I thought omitting gluten helped with bloating but i omitted it from my diet before i started enzyme therapy. I seem to be doing somewhat better since i started taking supplements...but cant put on any weight.<br><br><br><br>
I'm basically contemplating adding gluten back into my diet. Do you guys think this is a wise idea or not? Maybe it would help me put on some weight and since i'm taking enzymes now it wont bother me/bloat me as much? I dunno...GOSH I MISS BREAD! heh<br><br><br><br>
If I were to add wheat/gluten back into my diet how would I got about doing this? What kind of bread should I try first....how often should I eat it? I dont want to freak out my body and add it too quickly....anny suggestions?
 

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I think anyone with digestive problems should cut out ALL animal products. Anyone who eats dairy with digestive problems is just asking for trouble.<br><br><br><br>
(Actually, those people who do NOT have digestive problems and eat dairy are also asking for trouble, but that is another story. Dairy is poison.)<br><br><br><br>
I suggest you try to cut out all animal products, including eggs, for three months. If you don't see an improvement in your digestion, I would be VERY surprised.<br><br><br><br>
Don't worry about protein so much. People get all worked up about protein. I eat about 80% fruit only and am getting more than enough protein from them.
 
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