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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,<br>
i'v been a vegetarian for a few weeks now and i hate when i tell ppl im a vegetarian and they always list other thing that use animal products and ask why i still use those. Things like glue,silk ,leather ..ect, i dont know how to respond to that because i do love animals and am not eating meat/eggs ...so where do u draw the line on what u do and do not use from animals? sry if this is a stupid Q but i dont wanna sound dumb when people ask this. THANKS<br><br>
Also i want to stop feeding my dog food that has meat in it now that i have stopped, does anyone know any dog food brands that do that? that are not that expensive , bc my parents will be buying it and thy dont really support me becoming a vegetarian. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> thxs
 

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I really kept it low when I first went vegetarian. To me, that was the best way to avoid stupid comments that people will remember you said! I wanted to research as much as I could so I had facts to back what I believed was doable and healthy.<br>
Avoiding animal ingrediants isn't easily done overnight. most new vegans can't afford to just ditch what leather, wool etc. they already own, so it's a gradual phasing out as they wear out, and can be replaced. I pretty much stopped things like commercial cleaners, shampoo, and most new things in favor of simple ingrediants like baking soda and thrift store finds.<br><br>
Be careful in changing your dogs diet. Many dogs do very well on vegetarian diets, along with eggs, but others don't. Vegans don't believe in exploiting animals, and to me that means letting them live as close to the natural life as possible. Cats are carnivours. They've been totally domesticated, can't revert to a wild environment, and depend on people to home them, and that includes giving them meat, and having them altered. As unvegan as it sounds, I don't see an alternative as the damage has been done in domesticating them, and we owe them reperations.<br>
How old is your dog, and what type? Natural Balance has a vegetarian formula in dry and cans thats resonably priced, and available at pet food stores, but please go slowly and keep it monitored. Be willing to accept to go back to the old diet if your dog isn't thriving.<br><br>
Just be willing to tell people you're transitioning to a vegetarian life, and it's journey, not a destination.<br><br>
Good Luck and welcome!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much Silva, i think research is the best way to go like you said bc you have facts to back you up. my dog just turned 1 and he's a Pitbull and i was also worried about changing his diet so i think im just gonna ask his vet. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> thanks thou
 

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The world hasn't been build in one day. So why would you change in one day.<br>
Nobody is perfect, but you can learn every day.<br>
It took me 54 years to change from vegetarian to vegan (more than a year now).
 

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First off...no question is stupid! That's what VeggieBoards is for..to answer your questions! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
I hate to list a PETA site here, since a lot of people here don't support them. I don't for sure, but they have a list of vegetarian pet food brands at the bottom. <a href="http://www.peta.org/living/companion-animals/vegetarian-cats-and-dogs.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.peta.org/living/companion...-and-dogs.aspx</a><br><br>
I don't really know a lot about feeding your pet vegetarian diets, but I know that many dogs have been successfully raised on it, and you can keep your dog healthy this way. But...I don't feed my dog vegetarian. I like to keep it as natural as possible just as silva said.<br><br>
As it comes to your other questions, I would say just know that facts. I stopped wearing leather myself mostly because I wanted my family and friends to know that I'm serious about my vegetarianism, becuase they weren't taking me seriously. But, just know your information, and you'll be fine. You can simply explain to these people that there are different levels of vegetarianism and that this is the point at which you chose to draw the line. Some people take it to the extremes, and some are pretty mellow with it, and some people, as yourself, are in the middle. Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>LiveLifeHumane</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3015951"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You can simply explain to these people that there are different levels of vegetarianism and that this is the point at which you chose to draw the line. !</div>
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is a good way to explain to people . <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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On the first issue you have a variety of options on how to respond. You can turn it around and ask them why they eat certain animals but not others. And point out how that's the same kind of inconsistency. You can say, "If I told you that I donate blood but not bone marrow would you think I was a hypocrite?" Or you can be less defensive about it and just say, "I plan to do that in the future but right now I'm doing this - eating cruelty free."<br><br>
On the second issue, you also have lots of options. There's <a href="http://www.v-dogfood.com/" target="_blank">v-dog</a> which is a vegan dogfood you can order online and since shipping is free the price is comparable to storebought dogfood that contains animal ingredients. There are also vegetarian and vegan dogfoods from these brands that you can just buy at most pet supply stores like PetSmart and petCo: <b>Natural Balance, Avoderm, and Pet Guard, Nature's Recipe</b>. You can also use a book called <i>The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book</i> that give you information about how and why dogs can eat plant-based diets and it has a ton of recipes you can make for your pooches.<br><br>
My two dogs eat vegan kibble along with vegan or vegetarian dog treats, carrots, apples, peanut butter, and other leftover fruits and veggies (except NOT grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, potatoes, etc.). I've also had visitor dogs (foster, friends, etc) that I have fed vegan kibble to. They all eat it, some more enthusiastically than others. To get them to transition, it's a good idea to feed them a mixture of their old food with their new food to wean them off the old food. In some special cases you may have to compromise and use a nonveg dogfood, but those would be the exception to the rule. In general, dogs can go veg just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3016750"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
On the first issue you have a variety of options on how to respond. You can turn it around and ask them why they eat certain animals but not others. And point out how that's the same kind of inconsistency. You can say, "If I told you that I donate blood but not bone marrow would you think I was a hypocrite?" Or you can be less defensive about it and just say, "I plan to do that in the future but right now I'm doing this - eating cruelty free."<br><br>
On the second issue, you also have lots of options. There's <a href="http://www.v-dogfood.com/" target="_blank">v-dog</a> which is a vegan dogfood you can order online and since shipping is free the price is comparable to storebought dogfood that contains animal ingredients. There are also vegetarian and vegan dogfoods from these brands that you can just buy at most pet supply stores like PetSmart and petCo: <b>Natural Balance, Avoderm, and Pet Guard, Nature's Recipe</b>. You can also use a book called <i>The Simple Little Vegan Dog Book</i> that give you information about how and why dogs can eat plant-based diets and it has a ton of recipes you can make for your pooches.<br><br>
My two dogs eat vegan kibble along with vegan or vegetarian dog treats, carrots, apples, peanut butter, and other leftover fruits and veggies (except NOT grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, potatoes, etc.). I've also had visitor dogs (foster, friends, etc) that I have fed vegan kibble to. They all eat it, some more enthusiastically than others. To get them to transition, it's a good idea to feed them a mixture of their old food with their new food to wean them off the old food. In some special cases you may have to compromise and use a nonveg dogfood, but those would be the exception to the rule. In general, dogs can go veg just fine.</div>
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Thanks , i think i'm just gonna talk to his vet about switching it over, but i'll keep in mind those dog food brands<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Also those are good responses bc lots of ppl have been calling me a hypocrite or saying that im gonna be anorexic because im not gonna have protein...but it doesnt just come form meat so yeaa people are so rude.
 

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Just to warn you that your vet is not very likely to know vegetarian dog food brands, and if s/he (gonna go with he for convenience) does they will have been presented to him by sales reps wanting him to sell them to patients so his info is probably not reliable. That's if he even supports giving your dog vegetarian food which most vets won't, through ignorance. You are probably going to have to do your own research or get the info from vegetarian dog owners.
 

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Dogs take swimmingly to veganism. As do female cats. It's possible with male kitties but they'll potentially need a synthetic taurine supplement if a pH imbalance occurs.<br><br>
While convenient, it's not easy to find vegetarian formulated food made by companies that specialize in just that. There are a couple small outfits online, but depending on the size of the dog it may not end up being too cost effective. Rather than supporting companies that offer a vegetarian blend while simultaneously pimping the usual cruel varieties, I'd recommend making your own. There's a bevvy of recipes and even step by step videos available online.<br><br>
Weaning your dog off his old stuff and onto the new shouldn't be an issue. 3/4 old-1/4 new for a week, 1/2-1/2 the next, etc.<br><br>
Dogs and cats have evolved like the rest of us, and the overstated need for meat is commercial malfeasance. In fact, more and more dogs are being diagnosed with meat allergies!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>agalloch</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3018970"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Dogs take swimmingly to veganism. As do female cats. It's possible with male kitties but they'll potentially need a synthetic taurine supplement if a pH imbalance occurs.</div>
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Cats are obligate carnivores; dogs can eat an omnivorous diet. Cats without taurine suffer heart damage and go blind. Male AND female cats need taurine, and both male and female cats can have urinary problems resulting from eating vegetarian diets. The difference is when female cats develop urinary crystals and stones, it is generally easier for them to pass them because they have wider urethras. Male cats have narrower urethras and are more likely to get blocked from crystals/stones. A female cat can still be in significant discomfort from them, but it is less likely to cause serious harm.
 

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Dogs can/do thrive on vegan diets. There's countless stories of them doing so. The science behind feline adaptability is still in it's infancy, but it's gaining some ground. It presents quite a quandary homing companion animals while relying on the suffering of other animals to feed them.
 

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Taurine is added to cat foods anyway.<br>
What about vitamin A? What I've researched points to a carnivours need to have vit A "formulated" through an animals digestion before it can be of use to them. Kind of like how B12 is formulated through other animals digestion before we can use it (in manure or meat).<br><br>
Hey, what happened to our cat vets? VeganTigress is missing, but so is that female vet that used to post? Can't remember her name. I miss them!
 

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Simply ask your veterinarian! And, give us an update on what he/she says! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/thumbsup.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":up:">
 

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On the topic of avoiding all animal products all the time - it's not about perfection. It's about taking whatever realistic steps you can to reduce suffering in the world. Just by living and existing we cause some degree of suffering. It doesn't mean we don't try. I'll bet your friends who criticize you aren't perfectly consistent in all of their world views either, and would not like it if someone pointed out their flaws. I'll bet their argument would be "nobody's perfect" or something like that. Well, vegetarians are somebodies too, so why should we be perfect?
 

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On feeding your pets vegetarian pet food, I offer this well-written <a href="http://www.vegepets.info/assets/Vegan%20pet%20food%20Knight%200805%20Lifescape.pdf" target="_blank">article</a>. What sold me is the fact that various animal shelters send the bodies of euthanized animals to be made into another ingredient in pet food, along with animals on the killing-room floor in slaughterhouses. Cannibalizing our pets isn't natural, and I certainly won't stop my cats from searching out mice and rats or squirrels, in the wild, to eat.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tephrochr</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3041256"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
On feeding your pets vegetarian pet food, I offer this well-written <a href="http://www.vegepets.info/assets/Vegan%20pet%20food%20Knight%200805%20Lifescape.pdf" target="_blank">article</a>. What sold me is the fact that various animal shelters send the bodies of euthanized animals to be made into another ingredient in pet food, along with animals on the killing-room floor in slaughterhouses. Cannibalizing our pets isn't natural, and I certainly won't stop my cats from searching out mice and rats or squirrels, in the wild, to eat.<br><br>
That said, my question is this: As a financially struggling young adult, is it acceptable for me, turning vegan, to consume the foods that I have in my fridge that aren't vegan, or even vegetarian friendly (the spaghetti and meatballs I made last night, or the Becel margarine or Mini-Wheats on my shelf)? My formerly veg sister said that it's about transition, for instance, that I can't just strip my wardrobe and spend thousands of dollars on clothing that was made without slaughtering animals or exploiting other human beings. Opinions?</div>
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If I'm not mistaken you already started a thread on your second question. There's no need to repeat your questions in multiple places, people will see your thread.<br><br><br><br><br>
Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>dormouse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3041296"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If I'm not mistaken you already started a thread on your second question. There's no need to repeat your questions in multiple places, people will see your thread.</div>
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You're not mistaken, Dormouse. The fact is that I posted this before I started a new thread, figuring a new thread would draw more posters than people in this thread. How about I go ahead and edit my post and remove that question here (honestly, I lost track of this thread - new to all the shiny buttons on this forum).
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>silva</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3015712"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I really kept it low when I first went vegetarian. To me, that was the best way to avoid stupid comments that people will remember you said! I wanted to research as much as I could so I had facts to back what I believed was doable and healthy.<br>
Avoiding animal ingrediants isn't easily done overnight. most new vegans can't afford to just ditch what leather, wool etc. they already own, so it's a gradual phasing out as they wear out, and can be replaced. I pretty much stopped things like commercial cleaners, shampoo, and most new things in favor of simple ingrediants like baking soda and thrift store finds.<br><br>
Be careful in changing your dogs diet. Many dogs do very well on vegetarian diets, along with eggs, but others don't. Vegans don't believe in exploiting animals, and to me that means letting them live as close to the natural life as possible. Cats are carnivours. They've been totally domesticated, can't revert to a wild environment, and depend on people to home them, and that includes giving them meat, and having them altered. As unvegan as it sounds, I don't see an alternative as the damage has been done in domesticating them, and we owe them reperations.<br>
How old is your dog, and what type? Natural Balance has a vegetarian formula in dry and cans thats resonably priced, and available at pet food stores, but please go slowly and keep it monitored. Be willing to accept to go back to the old diet if your dog isn't thriving.<br><br>
Just be willing to tell people you're transitioning to a vegetarian life, and it's journey, not a destination.<br><br>
Good Luck and welcome!</div>
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This sounds like a good idea, coz I experienced it when I told one friend that I am vegetarian, she said she has a cousin who's vegetarian, who's always trying to make her vegetarian too, and I sensed that this wasn't what she's happy to hear, however, I ain't someone who keeps telling others to be vegetarian actually. And another thing is when I invite friend to come dining with me, I can only make vegetarian food, maybe they are more interested in things more than this, and I'm bit confused in this, nowadays I don't like to invite people for meal... And I guess it's better to keep it low that I am vegetarian, and at the same time it's not that easy to have a wonderful meal with others, hmm, don't know what to do, hehe...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElaineV</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3016750"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
On the first issue you have a variety of options on how to respond. You can turn it around and ask them why they eat certain animals but not others. And point out how that's the same kind of inconsistency. You can say, "If I told you that I donate blood but not bone marrow would you think I was a hypocrite?"</div>
</div>
<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/iloveyou.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lovesign:">
 
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