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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my new year's resolutions is to become a vegetarian. I am very new to vegetarianism and need some advice. I come from a meat-eating family, who will not consider any vegetarian items. Can anybody give me some advice and help me?
 

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It's great you've made the step to become veggie!!! It depends what kind of advice you're looking for - people have different needs and concerns when becoming vegetarian.
What in particular are you concerned about?

Check out the vegetarian society for loads of useful information.
https://www.vegsoc.org/ I understand what it's like coming from a meat-eating family, I do too, but you just have to push through and keep on standing up for yourself.
 

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You could do 'vegetarian days' a week - start with 2, move to 3, etc, until you're confident being fully vegetarian.


Or try to cook your favourite meat meals with vegetarian alternatives! There's quorn, tofu, and so many substitutes out there, so it's almost like nothing has changed.


One thing I will say though is, forgive yourself for slip ups. Obviously the aim is not to have them, but I had them, and it really knocked my progress when I really punished myself for it. Just acknowledge that they happen and learn from them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am giving myself one more day to eat meat, then I am starting this vegetarian diet tomorrow at the beginning of the new year. What is quorn? I have never heard of it. Also, how do I make sure I am getting the right amount of nutrients that are vital to my health?
 

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Quorn is a meat replacement.
Good luck for tomorrow!

And eat your five fruit & veg a day, make sure bread, potatoes, pasta etc for starchy foods are about a third of your diet, make sure you keep eating dairy foods for vitamin B12. Also nuts and pinto beans are pretty good for protein!
 

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It is hard at first, but there's plenty of support here and don't be afraid to ask questions!! After so long it becomes second-nature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have lasted a week before, but I didn't know how a vegetarian diet worked then. I just stopped eating meat for a week, but didn't do anything else. So, I am pretty sure I can last a lifetime.
 

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Welcome to the veg life! Congrats on making a choice that will be better for animals, the environment, and your own health.

Here are tips for vegetarians from the USDA. It's a helpful list of things to remember and it's geared specifically to people like you who are generally unfamiliar with veg food. And because it's from the USDA, which is a trusted source by many meat-eaters, you can show it to your friends and family to help them understand that your health will not be impaired by your compassionate choice.

Quote:
Tips for Vegetarians

Build meals around protein sources that are naturally low in fat, such as beans, lentils, and rice. Don't overload meals with high-fat cheeses to replace the meat.

Calcium-fortified soymilk provides calcium in amounts similar to milk. It is usually low in fat and does not contain cholesterol.

Many foods that typically contain meat or poultry can be made vegetarian. This can increase vegetable intake and cut saturated fat and cholesterol intake. Consider:
pasta primavera or pasta with marinara or pesto sauce
veggie pizza
vegetable lasagna
tofu-vegetable stir fry
vegetable lo mein
vegetable kabobs
bean burritos or tacos

A variety of vegetarian products look (and may taste) like their non-vegetarian counterparts, but are usually lower in saturated fat and contain no cholesterol.

For breakfast, try soy-based sausage patties or links.

Rather than hamburgers, try veggie burgers. A variety of kinds are available, made with soy beans, vegetables, and/or rice.

Add vegetarian meat substitutes to soups and stews to boost protein without adding saturated fat or cholesterol. These include tempeh (cultured soybeans with a chewy texture), tofu, or wheat gluten (seitan).

For barbecues, try veggie burgers, soy hot dogs, marinated tofu or tempeh, and veggie kabobs.

Make bean burgers, lentil burgers, or pita halves with falafel (spicy ground chick pea patties).

Some restaurants offer soy options (texturized vegetable protein) as a substitute for meat, and soy cheese as a substitute for regular cheese.

Most restaurants can accommodate vegetarian modifications to menu items by substituting meatless sauces, omitting meat from stir-fries, and adding vegetables or pasta in place of meat. These substitutions are more likely to be available at restaurants that make food to order.

Many Asian and Indian restaurants offer a varied selection of vegetarian dishes.
source link: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy...egetarian.html
 

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When I became a vegetarian, it didn't happen overnight. I slowly weaned out foods (first red meat, then pork, then chicken, then fish). Other folks I know did it "cold turkey". There's no one way one becomes a vegetarian and the path you choose will be the one that's right for you.

Instead of thinking about what you are not eating, think about what you are eating. The "meatless" days are a great start. If you're in the store, pick a vegetable that seems interesting and then hit google to find recipes and advice how to cook it. (For example, it's amazing what you can do with an eggplant!) Or, you can do the opposite and figure out the veggies your family already likes, and find new things to do with them.

And, perhaps you can focus on the side dishes your family is eating so they are suitable for you to eat. They can still have their "meat main dish" and your main dish is loading up on all the awesome side dishes that are meat-free. I know that if I threw a tofu laden main dish in front of my father, he'd turn his nose up at it because he feels I'm denying him from his meat. But, the sides he'll dig right into them. (If I call something "vegetarian" then my dad won't eat it. So, I love pointing out when he's eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, or eating cashews, or munching on an ear of corn - "Uh-oh! You're eating vegetarian!!! The horror!!!")

If you find that you're eating too much of one thing then that's when you're probably not getting the nutrients you need. (That is, if you're solely eating rice and pasta for every meal then you need to adjust your eating patterns.)

You'll find some family members are completely supportive while others can't understand it...and they never will. Hang in there and, most importantly, have fun! You've come to the right place for advice, guidance and support.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StevieAdele View Post

Okay, so are slip-ups normal for new vegetarians?
Yes, some foods are especially sneaky about not being veg. Like a vegetable barley soup made with chicken stock, or a caesar salad (has anchovies..and sometimes bacon
). Also many candies and supplements contain gelatin which isn't vegetarian. It's a process, you will slowly start to learn which items and brands you can't(won't) eat, and which new brands you love. If your family doesn't approve of your lifestyle, maybe make it a little sneaky too. A lot of meals and items are accidentally vegetarian, and won't draw as much negative attention as things like soy milk or tofu. For breakfast, cereal or oatmeal, lunch a salad or veggie sandwich, and dinner, spaghetti with tomato sauce, stir fries, and veggie soups, are all often eaten by omnivores as well.

Good luck at don't get discouraged!
 

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Hi, I'm new to vegetarianism and started on Thursday.
I've googled a lot of sites and got a few good recipes to start out with.
My main reason is that I was getting a lot of digestive upset, bloating and pain as well as extreme discomfort. Since starting I have immediately felt better, with one exception and that was the day i had falafel and hommus with salad in pita. Oh dear, the gas was bad! Never mind, I'll not do that again.
I'm keeping a food diary so that I can remember what I liked best and what didn't work so well (eg falafel).
So what I am thinking I'll do is to be vegetarian 6 days per week, and have fish one day per week - probably Saturday nights - as a treat? I had prawns and rice this Saturday just gone and they didn't give me any discomfort at all much to my delight.
I am really happy to find this site, and have read a lot of posts. I'm sure I'll have a lot of questions as time goes by and hopefully you can help me?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegginMegabeth View Post

When I became a vegetarian, it didn't happen overnight. I slowly weaned out foods (first red meat, then pork, then chicken, then fish). Other folks I know did it "cold turkey". There's no one way one becomes a vegetarian and the path you choose will be the one that's right for you.
I did it "cold turkey", and I found that it worked really well for me, because it didn't take me long to be used to not eating meat anymore. After about a month I didn't feel like eating meat at all. I liked the smell of roast chicken, for example, but the thought of eating it completely threw me off.
So if you find that the gradual change doesn't work, you can always try it cold turkey.
 

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I had several slips the last few years, I been distracted, hurt during the distraction and we are in process of getting a home, when we do get a home I am making adjustments because, I will not be distracted so much and I can live peacefully,just take it one step at a time and one day at a time.
 
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