VeggieBoards banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey! I've already introduced myself, but just in case - I'm a 22-year-old female vegetarian from Russia.<br><br>
I apologize in advance if this post is too long, but I've been struggling a lot and didn't have anyone to talk to about these things, so I'm a little impatient to share about my experience and about my struggles with vegetarianism.<br><br>
So ... I've only become vegetarian a couple of months ago, which is not long, I know. But honestly, I've been considering going veg ever since I started thinking where meat really comes from and how the animals are treated etc. The truth is I've been struggling ever since, and I mean even before going vegetarian.<br><br>
Here's my story:<br><br>
I love animals very, very much. It's just the way I was brought up, I guess. My whole family is like this. We've always had many pets. Since I was little I was helping my mom to look after abandoned cats and dogs or injured wild animals. For about 5 or 6 years we've been volunteering for this local animal protection organisation. We're taking care of stray or abandoned acts and kittens, nurse them to health if necessary and find families for them to be adopted into. I would even say, I consider myself an animal activist, since we sometimes attend demonstrations against animal cruelty and similar events.<br><br>
And yet all my family members (I was among them until recently) still eat meat. The primary reason for that is, I guess, that I live in Russia. I know, it's a lame excuse, but here there are very few vegetarians. The whole concept of vegetarianism is almost unheared of. Well, maybe I'm exagirating, but really, I don't have a single vegetarian among my friends and family members. I'm pretty sure I've only met a Russian vegetarian maybe once or twice in my life.<br><br>
Until I was in my late teens I hadn't thought much about where the meat comes from. It is true really, that in modern society, we go to the store and just buy these neatly packed pretty pieces of meat without even thinking about horrors of factory farms and slauterhouses...<br><br>
Another thing you should know about me (these boards are about food, after all) is that I have an eating disorder. I've had it for many years now. Please, don't think i'm this stick-thin girl who is terrefied to death of every calorie or that I spend half my day next to the toilet. Not all people with EDs are like that. But my eating patterns aren't normal and I do eat very little (or nothing) sometimes and sometimes I binge and purge and I have mental issues with food and my body and all. I know it doesn't really has a lot to do with vegetarianism but being veg is about what you eat (or don't eat, to be exact), so I think you should know this part of my life.<br><br>
So like I said, I've been considering going veg for a long time, but I was postponing it, telling my self I can get back to eat when I get my eating disorder under control. I thought that it wasn't the best idea to make such a drastic life change at that moment and make one more reason to be paranoid about food. But the years went by and my ED wasn't getting any better. So a couple of months ago I decided to go vegetarian. I just realized it's not right. I felt like such a hypocrete for telling people about cruelty on slauterhouses while continuing eating meat. I also watched (again) some of those documentaries and videos about factory farms and it just horrified me. I told myself, I can't do this anymore.<br><br>
To be honest, I never thought that going vegetarian would be very hard for me. I never liked meat too much. It's not like I hated the taste of meat or anything, no, I was enjoying it when I ate it, but it was never my favorite food. When my mom cooked meat I ate it but when I was leaving alone I rarely cooked any meat for myself. Because of my ED I used to spend many days or even weeks without eating any meat or fish without even realizing it. So even back then I didn't understand when people said: "where's the meat in your meal??!!). I always thought meat is just one of the foods available, not the main food.<br><br>
So more than two months into vegeteranism and I don't crave meat at all. I might crave some dishes that have meat in them when I get very hungry due to severe calorie restriction, but if I eat something vegetarian the cravings go away. Besides I still eat dairy and occasionally eggs so really, I don't see what the big deal is about not eating meat.<br><br>
And yet, despite that, I am still struggling. It's mostly a phylosophical struggle with the whole concept of vegetarianism, rather than I miss meat physically or phsychologically. Here's why:<br><br>
I became vegetarian solely because of animals. I do not follow any religion and I don't believe that veg*nism is the only way to be healthy. So if my reasons for going veg are purely ethical it would be logical for me to go vegan, right? Beccause we all know how horrible the dairy cows and laying hens are treated on the factory farms and that there's killing involved, too. So unless, you're going veg for other reasons rather than ethical, being lacto-vegetarian is pointless, right? Well, even though I sometimes think about going vegan in the future I still don't think I could stay one for long. And please, before you jump in and start screaming: "There's no excuse for not being vegan! Just try it and you'll see how easy it is!", please remember that I live in Russia! here it's not easy to be vegetarian here, let alone vegan. All the cuisine is traditionally based on animal producs, if not meat than dairy. Vegetarian restaurants are virtually non-existent, and vegetarian options in most restaurants are either very limited or also non-existent. So that makes eating out practically impossible. But cooking for myself wouldn't be easy either, because veggie products here are expensive. Yes, I know it's hard to believe, but it is true here. Fresh fruits and vegetables can be quite pricey, especially during winter (which is most of the year). Rare legumes like chickpeas and lentils are not easy to find and they are quite expensive as well. Now, soy products. Since they are not popular among Russians, our country does not produce any, so all of the soy products that you can find in our stores are imported, so naturally very expensive. Soy milk costs more than ten times more than regular milk (like half a gallon is $10!!) and it is only sold in a few stores. In coffee houses and cafes, soy milk is not an option. I've only seen tofu in one store and 10 oz pack costs $6! We don't have health food stores or anything like that so it is practicly impossible to find things like almond or rice milk, soy yogurt, hummus, veggie burgers etc. So yeah, unless, you are ready to live off of bread, potatoes, pasta and cabbage, you need to learn a lot to live a cruelty-free life (which is sad and just not fair, in my opinion).<br><br>
So here in Russia being vegan not only would be expensive but it would mean that I would have to cook all of my meals for myself! And I hate, hate cooking! To be honest, I just hate food in general... I hate that people nowadays spend so much time thinking, talking about food and eating... it's always revolves around what to eat, when and where... and no offence anyone, but it seems like many vegetarians and especially vegans and raw foodists are obsessed with food, it's like all they think about 24 hrs a day is food... even if you want to be healthy and your food is healthy (and cruelty-free), it's still not healthy to obsess about it so much.. I am already obsessed with food (even though in a different way) because of my eating disorder and I am afraid (actually I am sure) that going vegan would make me even more obsessed... And it's not like I haven't tried! I just recently came back from a trip to Thailand. Before going there I decided that I try to eat only vegan there, so it was sort of a challange. The trip lasted to weeks and I did manage to eat almost 100% vegan. And as much as I liked it wasn't so easy. Mind you, Thailand is a very vegan-friendly country, even despite all the seafood, they still have veggie options almost everywhere and an abundance of cheap fresh fruits and veggies. Besides there are many lactose-intolerant people there, so they don't have as much dairy as us. Besides they've got so many brands of soy milk! And still it wasn't easy. I annoyed my family a lot. I had to eat simple salad for dinner sometimes because if was the only vegan option etc. And it was just two weeks, and I was barely eating during this time... But still I wish I lived in Thailand, it's so easy to be veg*n there compared to Russia...<br><br>
On a side note, this to week experience kinda made me thing that being vegan is similar to being anorexic in a way... I read labels on everything I buy or put in my mouth because I'm obsessed with calories and fat. Vegans constantly read labels because they are obsessed with animal products... By the way, it's interesting that many people with eating disorders are vegetarian or even more often - vegan! I don't know the exact reason behind it, but I guess it's 'cause we are so concious about what we put into our bodies...<br><br>
So I kinda want to be vegan, but I also don't want to be vegan. And if I'm not vegan, than what's the point in being lacto-ovo vegetarian if it's "not good enough", if I'm still a hypocrete? You know what I'm saying? So it kinda makes me give up altogether...<br><br><i>(This post is getting too long, I'll contnue in the next one...)</i>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Another thing is that they say being a veg*n makes you more kind and in harmony with the world etc. Well, for me it was kinda the opposite. Becasue the truth is, we live ina meat-eating world. The majority of people eat meat. And if we say that all people who are not veg*n are "bad" and "wrong" and "misguided" it's really hard to be in harmony with the world, you know? I already hate the human race sometimes becasue of what we do and I don't want to become a bigger misanthrope. But if I don't believe that what I do is the right way and the only right way than it makes being veg*n really hard...<br>
Of course it would be so easy to be vegan if we were the only animals who'd eat meat, then it'd be so obvious that eating meat is wrong in itself. But many animals eat other animals, so saying that eating meat is wrong in itself would be like saying nature is wrong... (of course the animals don't know any better, and it doesn't mean we must do the same).<br>
And in terms of eating meat being unnatural to humans... well, I really don't believe that. I won't go into it here, I think I'll start a separete thread for this, but I know that many veg*ns believe that eating animal products is simply not natural for humans and that being veg*n is the only way to be healthy... again I don't believe that. I think that animal products in moderation (moderation is the key here) can be healthy. Yes, the hormones and antibiotics in meat and dairy aren't healthy, but they use pesticides and stuff like this to grow plants as well (also, in Russia we don't really have organic products, animal or plant, so it doesn't make any difference anyway). As for satuarated fats and cholesterol... people, why are you so afraid of cholesterol, like it's evil in pure form???! cholesterol isn't bad in itself, more than that it's necessary for our bodies to function. Our bodies produce it themselves even!<br>
Also a while ago I was a member on a low-carb forum. Yes, there were lots of people there who were very... extremist in their views and claimed that low-carb is the only way and all and some were eating almost nothing but meat, can you imagine! But the majority of people there were eating lots of veggies, meat, fish, eggs, some dairy and very little or no refined graines, sugar and stuff like this. Many of them were eating low-carb 5+ years and they claimed their health improved drastically: blood sugar stabilized, the level of cholesterol lowered (yes, despite all the fatty meat they ate)... their view is that it is not natural for humans to eat so many grains and sweet fruits and that the animal-based diet with a generous amount of veggies is the healthiest and most natural... To many of you it might sound crazy, but the facts are facts. Many, many people there imporoved their health, probably for the same reason many veg*ns do - they started watching more carefully what they eat, eating less processed foods, refined sugar and carbs, and more unprocessed foods and veggies (yes, most low-carbers eat a lot of vegetables). My point is, veg*nism is not the only way.<br><br>
What also bugs me is the existing stereotypes about vegetarians and vegans. I have this image on my mind that they are either these health-obsessed boring yoga geeks or uptight arrogant snobs who think that they are better than anyone else just because they are not eating animal products. I know, it is just a stereotype but at the same time, most of the vegans I've "met" on the internet very pushy and aggressive and some just plain obnoxious. Not to start a vegan-vegetarian debate agin and not to offend anyone, but I hate it that vegans sometimes bash vegetarians for having occational egg or some dairy instead of supporting them for at least partly reducing animal cruelty. Yes, I think, too, that world would be a better place if everybody would be vegan, but I also think that it is unrealistic to expect that all people would go veg anytime soon. Many people don't give a damn about animals, or environment or even their own health. Maybe instead of pushing veganism on everybody it would be more effective to just support small steps, like buying organic products or even simply reducing meat consumption? Because the all-or-nothing attitude that some veg*ns have makes me wanna give up altogether sometimes... But again, I'm not saying I hate vegans! No, no! I admire them! I from personal experience know how hard it is what they are doing).<br><br>
And one more thing, I think becoming a vegetarian or vegan for ethical reasons is about commitment. And I'm scared of that, I'm scared of commitements. Like, when you have an ED and give in and binge or simply eat something you shouldn't, you feel horrible, like you betrayed yourself. But when you are vegetarian and you give in and eat some animals products you feel much worse, like you betrayed all the animals in the world (at least that's how I would feel). I don't have a problem with not eating animal products per se, but I'm just afraid to say to myself: "you can never EVER eat this again!".<br><br>
Sorry, I know it turned out to be probably the longest post on these boards, but really it's just a rant. I admire you if you read it till the end ha-ha. As you can see, I'm really, really struggling That being said, i haven't had any meat or fish in almost three months and I am not plannin to anytime soon. Just to clarify. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">.<br><br>
So I posted this becasue I need your support. I don't know any veg*ns in real life, so it's hard for me. I'd be also happy to hear about your thoughts on the issues that I'm struggling with... maybe you have some healpful suggestions! Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
566 Posts
Well, first of all, you say that you don't like the 'all-or-nothing' attitude that some of the vegans you,ve met have portrayed, yet you feel your being l-o vegetarien isn't 'good enough'? You're right about something you said in your post: every small step deserves encouragement! Do you have any idea how many animal lives you're saving by opting meat out of your diet? There are sources that estimate how much it comes up to, sadly I don't remember sources for these, but off the top of my heada, it is approximately 90 or so animals per year. Youre being vegetarian is great and I applaud you! Especially given the dietary situation in your location. You should strive to do the best you can, without feeling like a 'hypocrite', cause you're not. Hey, if we all thought along those lines, well heck, I'm a hypocrite for killing a mosquito trying to feed on me! Every little bit counts, and follow your heart!<br><br>
Also, for the ED struggles you mentionned. I'm far from being an expert on this, but I found that reseraching and educating oneself on the reasons behind why such and such foods are good/bad for the human body helps me to know how much of what I need to consume. So as long as you know what's healthy for you, you shouldn't have to check the labels for calories/fats on everything. Use your head, sugar from a candy bar vs sugar from an apple, which is better? Cholesterol from meat vs cholesterol from seeds? But I've never had an ED and have no idea if what I'm saying here would actually help. All I know is: knowledge is power! The better 'empowered' you are regarding nutrition, the less afraid you should be.<br><br>
Also, if being vegan is something you EVENTUALLY would want to do, but are not ready for yet, remember that most vegans started off as vegetarians, some were for years before transitioning (keyword here: transition) to veganism. Don't bite off more than you can chew. Veganism can definitely be daunting. I used to think I 'could never be vegan'...and now I'm transiontiong into raw foods! (I'm lucky enough to live in Ottawa, Canada, where it seems the fresh fruit/vegetables situation is better than Russia)<br><br>
Keep posting on these boards, they are great for support!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
Wow, that is quite the post! It's impossible to touch on everything you wrote but one thing that stood out to me is your stereotype of vegans/vegetarians and your fear of commitment to any diet plan. First off: don't let some stereotype you have in your head define your ideas of vegan/vegetarianism. It's a lifestyle change but not something that defines you. I've been friends with people for months before they find out I'm veg*n, and then they act surprised and it makes me smile. What did they expect a vegetarian to look or act like? Apparently not me and perhaps I have just changed one persons idea of vegetarians. If someone asks me why I'm vegetarian I give a few reasons (that don't pertain to animal cruelty, I think everyone just assumes we do it for the animals) to make people think about other benefits to my diet but I never start ranting. You don't want to sound preachy. (Now if someone comes to me saying they are thinking of going vegetarian I'll talk their ear off on why they should do it haha) Anyway, my point is anyone can go vegetarian it doesn't make you a stereotype. And every time you tell someone you're vegetarian you don't need to fulfill that stereotype, in that way changing their views on vegetarians.<br><br>
As for your fear of commitment, don't be afraid. It's a journey. There is no true end process. Everyday we choose to not eat animal products, though we absolutely could. Nothing is really restricting us. If some day you can't do it, it's okay. But every time you choose to avoid animal products it feels good because you know you are making the right choice.<br><br>
I highly recommend you do some of your own research about vegetarian lifestyles and keep reading and posting on veggieboards. Knowledge is the key to understanding and sticking with vegetarianism. If you have anything you want to talk about just message me, I've been vegetarian about 3 years now and I know it can seem like a process.<br><br>
<3<br>
Heather
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Well, I'm glad you got that off your chest! Lol. I didn't get a chance to read the previous posts because I wanted to get my word on it before it slipped my mind. So, if there are any repeats, just disregard.<br><br>
First, having an eating disorder is very hard and I think what you need to do before you become veg*n is to throw away your food diary. I'm assuming you have one, and to just ask yourself: Is your eating disorder worth your health and hurting your body? I hope you're not turning into a veg*n lifestyle because of your eating disorder. It's not going to solve anything. I know all of this because I used to suffer from bulimia and anorexia. It's a horrible disease. You really deteriorate mentally and physically. Now, I live a happier life because when I had this mental disorder, I was miserable. You honestly have to look inside yourself and ACCEPT yourself for who you are. The only person that can free you from this-- is you. You don't want to suffer the way I've seen other people with ED suffer-- some have died.<br><br>
With regards to your veg*n lifestyle. I'm not sure how it is in Russia but I know that all markets aren't meat markets only. I suggest you do more research on your local markets to see what are veg*n friendly. That's what I do. I live in Michigan and the first thing that popped in my mind was deer hunting and fishing. Given there are people who do that here but I actually googled veggie friendly markets and stores-- I found PLENTY! I CHOOSE to not buy meat. I hate cooking too but as a 23 year old, I think I'm old enough to start taking care of myself. You have to want to do something in order to do it. IMHO.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for understanding and support! It's a reliefe that you don't judge me for my inner struggling. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><b>azerea</b>, what I meant by all-or-nothing atittude is that it's how some veg*ns on the internet make me feel sometimes about my vegetarianism, that's it's not good enough, it's not how i actually feel. I agree with you, every small step counts! this is my phylosophy also! everybody does as much as they can!<br><br>
And somehow I always forget that I'm actually directly saving animals by not eating meat. It just seems like i don't do much difference to affect the demand for meat... but I've read many times that veggies indeed save animal so I really want to believe it's true!<br><br>
As for my ED, yes, most anorexics would probably choose an apple over a candy-bar, becasue many of them (us) are also health-concious (even though what we do to our bodies is so unhealthy), but in the end of the day calories are calories, and whether they come from fruits or candy, you'd have to burn them off the same way...<br><br>
Thanks, <b>heather</b> for support! I agree 100% with everything you said! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><b>ecl23</b><br>
Yes, you're right, it such a relief to get it of my chest! especially on a forum where people are fimiliar with my struggles and probably even went through similar things...<br><br>
I'm sorry to hear that you've struggled with an ED in the past, but it's nice to know I'm not alone here. Well, I don't have a food diary, but I do keep a food accountability online, it's kinda the same thing... Believe me, I know how bad and unhealthy it is what I'm doing and I'd love to stop, but you probably know though your own experience how hard it is! I've had an ED for so long that it's almost became a part of me of who I am, just like veg*anism became a part of many people identities here... So it's really really hard for me to think differently from the way I think now and always accept myself the way i am and love myself and all that jazz... But don't worry, like I said, my ED isn't that bad. Yes, sometimes i feel miserable and depressed, but most of the time I am ok... I don't have access to therapy and stuff like this, so I'm hoping I'll just "overgrow" my ED with time like many girls do...<br><br>
I'll try to search for more veggie-friendly places in my area. I'm sure I haven't done enough research!<br><br>
Thanks for your help! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
908 Posts
Good on you for speaking out! It's important to talk about these things.<br><br>
Now, I'm in a bit of a hurry so I can't address everything you said (besides, other people did that better than I could already <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">) but here's what I think on veganism/EDs: no, it's NOT the same. I look at a label and I make a decision that is based on the desire to do good for my body, the environment, animals and maybe my karma. Now, I don't have an eating disorder, but ultimately the decision I'd end up making would not be based on these desires. It would ultimately come from a place of not treating my body with the care it deserves. So that's a difference to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>longstocking</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2836321"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><b>ecl23</b><br>
Yes, you're right, it such a relief to get it of my chest! especially on a forum where people are fimiliar with my struggles and probably even went through similar things...<br><br>
I'm sorry to hear that you've struggled with an ED in the past, but it's nice to know I'm not alone here. Well, I don't have a food diary, but I do keep a food accountability online, it's kinda the same thing... Believe me, I know how bad and unhealthy it is what I'm doing and I'd love to stop, but you probably know though your own experience how hard it is! <b>I've had an ED for so long that it's almost became a part of me of who I am,</b> just like veg*anism became a part of many people identities here... So it's really really hard for me to think differently from the way I think now and always accept myself the way i am and love myself and all that jazz... But don't worry, like I said, my ED isn't that bad. Yes, sometimes i feel miserable and depressed, but most of the time I am ok... I don't have access to therapy and stuff like this, so I'm hoping I'll just "overgrow" my ED with time like many girls do...<br><br>
I'll try to search for more veggie-friendly places in my area. I'm sure I haven't done enough research!<br><br>
Thanks for your help! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
<br>
For the bolded, I think that's where you're mistaken. Your ED doesn't define who you are, you make it define you. Just as many of us veg*ns don't identify ourselves as veg*ns, basically what I'm trying to say is I don't walk around with a sticker on my forehead saying "vegetarian". Some of my friends don't even know I'm vegetarian nor do they point at me and say, "yeah, it's that veggie girl". Maybe I misread your comment but that's what it sounded like to me.<br><br>
Have you talked to your parents, counselors, or anyone you know about your ED? I think it's imperative for you to talk to someone you trust about it to seek help before it gets worst. You may not think the severity of your ED is bad but I don't know you and I don't know in what condition you're in but regardless an ED is an ED. You need to seek help in order for you to stop. There's a famous quote: "You can lead the horse to the water but you can't make the horse drink." You need to want to stop.<br><br>
Another thing, you say you're 22 years old, I don't know how long you've had an eating disorder but, newsflash honey, you're not going to out-grow it over time. It's only going to consume you more over time unless you seek help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
<b>Kjesta</b> , never meant to say EDs and veg*nism are the same. Of course not. EDs demage to our health, our lives and our realtionships and at the end of the day, they are...well, selfish, because they are about us. Veg*sm is about doing the right thing and making the world a better place, and it's so healthy! (can be demaging for the relationships too, though, sometimes, lol)<br><br><b>ecl23</b>, thanks again for your comment. Believe me, I know really well how bad the EDs are. I'm a part of a ED support group and I know a lot of girls there and their experiences over the years. And comparing to them I might seem like a healthy person with normal eating patterns ha-ha.<br><br>
On a more serious note, it's not easy to get help with EDs here, but I'm working on it. I'm currently trying to find a therapist or phychiatrist that I can afford!<br><br>
Anyway thatnk again for your help! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,385 Posts
hey!<br><br>
i am russian too, but i live in canada. and i must say, hats off to you for being vegetarian there! i know another russian girl here that is vegan, but that is pretty much it. and we are in a country where this is much easier, yet many Russians consider it crazy. I can't even imagine how hard it is back there. I am worried about visiting my family because I know the difficulty i would face.<br><br>
Just don't pressure yourself, don't make it a problem. like was said before, it is a journey, do your best so it makes you feel better, explore your possibilities, every step, even a little one is a great thing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Ira</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2838122"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
hey!<br><br>
i am russian too, but i live in canada. and i must say, hats off to you for being vegetarian there! i know another russian girl here that is vegan, but that is pretty much it. and we are in a country where this is much easier, yet many Russians consider it crazy. I can't even imagine how hard it is back there. I am worried about visiting my family because I know the difficulty i would face.<br><br>
Just don't pressure yourself, don't make it a problem. like was said before, it is a journey, do your best so it makes you feel better, explore your possibilities, every step, even a little one is a great thing <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
</div>
<br>
Hey to a fellow Russian here, lol! Well thank you for support, but you know, now i'm thinking that i was probably exaggerating in my first post about how hard it is to be veg*n in Russia. I just haven't done enough research, I guess. I just recently found a forum for veg*ns living in Russia. Turns out, there are plenty of us here! Lots of vegans, too (the majority on that forum, actually). And not all people think I'm crazy. One of my friends actually went vegeraian recently <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">. My family is quite supportive, too. It depends on the people, I guess. Reading people stories on this board, i'd say they are not much different from problems that many russian veggies face.<br>
The hardest part for me is the lack of veggie products in the stores (no veggie burgers, no soy products etc.) and the lack of veggie and veggie-friendly restarants. I hope that will change soon, though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,945 Posts
I think it's great that you went veg. in Russia. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
908 Posts
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>longstocking</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2837918"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><b>Kjesta</b> , never meant to say EDs and veg*nism are the same. Of course not. EDs demage to our health, our lives and our realtionships and at the end of the day, they are...well, selfish, because they are about us. Veg*sm is about doing the right thing and making the world a better place, and it's so healthy! (can be demaging for the relationships too, though, sometimes, lol)</div>
</div>
<br>
Concerning the last point, I prefer to think that veg*nism points out flaws in a relationship that might not have been as noticable before. If a friend of mine teases me for my ethical beliefs and blatantly disregards them, then I think that she has never been as good and respectful a friend of mine as I thought. That disrespect would have surfaced sooner or later, but it's not the veg*nism itself that's the problem - it's lack of consideration and respect. So, I consider people who antagonise me over my food not to be my friends. It can be tough, yes, but ultimately it makes as wiser concerning who our true friends are <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top