VeggieBoards banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone!

My name is Brittany. I am new to veganism (and this forum), having only been vegan for about a month. I feel very strongly about my new lifestyle and want to start off right. I've been doing a bunch of research, bought a lot of cookbooks, trying new foods i've never heard of before...Its fun and I want to give myself every possible chance to suceed.

So far, i've been surprised how easy the transition has been. However, I have a disclaimer to make: before going vegan, I wasn't even veggie. I wouldnt say I ate a lot of meat or diary, but, to be honest, it wasn't something I really put a lot of thought into. I say this because I feel like I have a lot of learning to do and i suspect there is a lot of basic nutrition/animal wellness issues that I am still completely unaware of.

1.) I know not to eat eggs/milk/honey, etc...but there are some animal products that are more elusive, right? (Casein, i think?) Are there other ingredients that I should be on the look out for, that I might not typically associate with being non-vegan?

2.) Are there vitamins/supplements that it would be advisable to take because of the transition to a vegan diet?

3.) What about beyond the vegan diet? How would a beginning vegan go about being more conscious about animal products in other areas such as comestics/beauty care?

I'd really appreciate any help/tips/advice regarding beginning veganism...Thanks everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I don't know how much help I can be, another new Vegan for 1 month. Casin and Whey are a royal pain to avoid, especially when it comes to coffee creamers. Also be aware of gelatin, it's derived from animals. Agave syrup is a good substitute for Honey, and the Silk Creamer is great for coffee. I personally take B12, and a combo of Calcium (non animal orgin) with D. I take the Calcium and D for my low bone density, and B12 because I personally need it as a supplement. You may not need it, but it's something to keep in mind. I haven't haven't thrown out my leather yet, but am concentrating on any further purchases being animal free. Will eventually replace the rest of my leather with other animal friendly products once it wears out. The Ener G egg replacer I've found excellent for baked goods, and it comes out just as good as it normally would with eggs. I would check out the Vegan boards, as there are tons of great info that will really help you out. And perhaps other members can give you further info on things to avoid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,126 Posts
All vegans should be supplementing with B12. Try the Vegan RD website for more advice about food and supplements, especially this page: http://www.theveganrd.com/food-guide-for-vegans

As far as other areas such as beauty and cosmetics, I personally try to only use products that are actually labeled vegan (or "no animal ingredients, no animal testing") wherever possible. It just makes things easier than trying to figure out all the time whether product X from brand Y is vegan. Some of my favorite companies for toiletries and cosmetics are LUSH, Kiss My Face, Urban Decay, and Beauty Without Cruelty. All of these brands (except BWC) do make some non-vegan products, but they label their vegan products to make shopping easier for vegans.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,131 Posts
I'm a new vegan, too, about two months or so, and I, too, wasn't vegetarian first, so I know how you feel about all the overwhelming ingredients to look out for. Do you have an iPhone? I use an app called Animal free and it has a list of animal and vegan ingredients. It's handy in the store so you can search the ingredients and see if it's vegan or not. If your phone at least has internet, that's helpful for looking up brands. When I first went vegan, I always searched, "Is -blank- vegan?" until I got an idea of the ingredients to look out for and the brands and products to buy.

I take a multi-vitamin that has a lot of different vitamins in it, including B12. It's two pills a day with a meal, and I think it says it's 1333% of the daily value of B12. It's called OneSource women's, and it's very common, I even found it at WalMart, Target, etc. since I don't go to health food stores often. It says it's coated, which at first I thought meant gelatin coated and I didn't get it, but when I actually looked at the bottle it's actually coated with green tea, so it has a very nice aftertaste that isn't chalky like other vitamins, and it's easy to swallow without it being gelatin coated.

I'd start by googling the brands you currently use of everything to figure out if they test on animals and are vegan. You may already have some vegan supplies. For toothpaste, Tom's of Maine is a good brand and L'Oreal's Everpure hair line doesn't test on animals. Bath and Body Works, Victoria's Secret, and PINK all have products that aren't tested on animals, so I get things like lotion, lip gloss, and body wash from there. I think Victoria's Secret has a lot of makeup so that would be a place to get nontested makeup, too. Pink Body is a line that's sure to have vegan ingredients, in addition to not testing on animals (http://www.peta.org/living/beauty-an...Care-Line.aspx). I personally see veganism as a journey, so if you have non-vegan home and beauty products, I'd say it's okay to use them up and then replace them with vegan products that aren't tested on animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,026 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFromMars View Post

1.) I know not to eat eggs/milk/honey, etc...but there are some animal products that are more elusive, right? (Casein, i think?) Are there other ingredients that I should be on the look out for, that I might not typically associate with being non-vegan?
There are lots of little ingredients but if I were you I wouldn't worry about those things for now. It's hard enough to transition to a plant-based diet and simply get used to eating foods that "seem vegan." There's a lot of uncertainty when it comes to some ingredients - sometimes it's from an animal source and sometimes it's not. And the sources for certain additives change over time so right now it may be animal-based but in 5 years it might be plant-based. Most importantly, removing those teeny tiny ingredients is unlikely to help a single animal.

If you decide it's important to you later, then you can always get more strict about your veganism later. Some ways to learn what's 100% purely vegan are:
- only buy items that say "vegan" on the label and/or are simply fruits, veggies, grains, nuts, and beans
- don't buy items with ingredients that you don't know what are
- consult lists like Animal Ingredients A-Z (or a smart phone app like this one: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010...ucts-video.php )

But I'll tell you this: I've been vegetarian or vegan for nearly 3 decades and I simply cannot stay current on all those ingredients. I'm a smart person with a passion for animals yet my brain simply cannot hold that list of ingredients. Whenever I have to make absolutely certain that something is 100% totally vegan, I do those three things above. But for the life of me I cannot memorize those ingredients.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFromMars View Post

2.) Are there vitamins/supplements that it would be advisable to take because of the transition to a vegan diet?
B12 is the only one that every vegan needs. Every other vitamin would be on a case-by-case basis depending on your diet and lifestyle. For example, if you avoid table salt you might want to take an iodine supplement. If you avoid the sun then you might want to take a vitamin D supplement. If you don't consume dark leafy veggies nor drink fortified soy milk or OJ then you might want to consider taking a supplement for calcium. You get the picture...

Personally, I take B12 a couple times a week. I drink fortified soy milk or eat fortified soy pudding a couple times a week. I get sunshine everyday. I use table salt in my cooking. I eat a clif bar or drink a Vega smoothie every now and then. I eat legumes everyday. I eat fruit everyday. I eat veggies and grains everyday. I exercise 5 days a week. I go to the doctor when I'm sick or injured. I have been vaccinated. I wash my hands regularly. I brush my teeth twice a day. And so on... I'm not some picture of perfect health or anything, but being vegan hasn't harmed my health in any way.

Here are some basic eating guides:
http://www.vegansoapbox.com/getting-...d-in-veganism/ (two guides you can print out and put on your fridge)
http://www.theveganrd.com/food-guide-for-vegans (Ashlend already posted, but it's good so it deserves another link)
http://www.chooseveg.com/vegan-food-pyramid.asp (if you're familiar with the old pyramid then you might like this new one)
http://www.pcrm.org/health/PowerPlate/ (simple, and easy to use)
http://www.veganoutreach.org/guide/gce.pdf (longer, in-depth)

Quote:
Originally Posted by VeganFromMars View Post

3.) What about beyond the vegan diet? How would a beginning vegan go about being more conscious about animal products in other areas such as comestics/beauty care?
I'd start by just browsing. If you google vegan beauty you will find lots of info. You can also just look for the "vegan" label on products at Whole Foods, Sephora, Lush, etc. Admittedly, it will take some trial and error before you find vegan versions of all the things you "need" but just take it one day or one item at a time.
If you have a smart phone you can use the Be Nice To Bunnies app: http://www.peta.org/features/stephan...phone-app.aspx or find another similar app.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the great advice and resources!!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top