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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is Halle


she's a bout 10 weeks old in the pictures, we've had her for 2 weeks and we're already noticing changes in the shape of her face and stuff so i'll post new pics sometime soon. she's a boston terrier. love her markings, they're almost perfectly symmetrical except for one foot lol a few spots on the face.

she's so friendly and cuddly


but.. sooooo bad lol. she's too young to get too deep into training but she's very smart. she already knows 'sit' and 'come'. for the moment we're focusing on paper training and training her out of biting (furniture, us, the cat lol). any tips on either would be great.

when she gets her crazy hyper bursts she likes to run obstacle coarses of sorts.. she'll do a lap around the livingroom dodging around all the furniture, and if the spare room or bedroom door is open she'll dive under the bed, crawl around and out the other end, up the hall into the kitchen and do a lap and then repeat. i haven't seen it yet but hubby also says she likes to weave around his feet while he's walking. so i'm thinking agility training might be something she'd be good at down the road. when and how do we start something like that and what are the benefits as far as a family pet is concerned? we got a clicker for training and the pamphlet that came with it just says after a trick you click and then give a treat and eventually the click will be the reward in itself. is there more to it than this? and any tips on how to deal with bad behaviour? at the moment scolding usually just makes her made and want to bite us. and if she's doing something really interesting like chewing something she shouldn't, just telling her to come doesn't work, or she'll just go right back to it. we've tried distracting her with toys or replacing objects she's chewing with chewtoys but someone suggested that we're just rewarding the chewing behaviour and that she won't understand that it's ok to chew one thing and another.

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyFaile View Post

she's so friendly and cuddly


but.. sooooo bad lol. she's too young to get too deep into training but she's very smart. she already knows 'sit' and 'come'. for the moment we're focusing on paper training and training her out of biting (furniture, us, the cat lol). any tips on either would be great.

when she gets her crazy hyper bursts she likes to run obstacle coarses of sorts.. she'll do a lap around the livingroom dodging around all the furniture, and if the spare room or bedroom door is open she'll dive under the bed, crawl around and out the other end, up the hall into the kitchen and do a lap and then repeat. i haven't seen it yet but hubby also says she likes to weave around his feet while he's walking. so i'm thinking agility training might be something she'd be good at down the road. when and how do we start something like that and what are the benefits as far as a family pet is concerned? we got a clicker for training and the pamphlet that came with it just says after a trick you click and then give a treat and eventually the click will be the reward in itself. is there more to it than this? and any tips on how to deal with bad behaviour? at the moment scolding usually just makes her made and want to bite us. and if she's doing something really interesting like chewing something she shouldn't, just telling her to come doesn't work, or she'll just go right back to it. we've tried distracting her with toys or replacing objects she's chewing with chewtoys but someone suggested that we're just rewarding the chewing behaviour and that she won't understand that it's ok to chew one thing and another.

Gorgeous puppy! I want another dog but I not allowed so says my other half


Anyways, a puppy so young is going to be crazy no matter what. With the whole scolding her and her trying to nip thing, sounds like you guys need to assert your dominance. She needs to learn you guys are boss.

Clicker training helps the dog to learn exactly when they have done something good, and the click should be given when the good deed has been done, followed by a treat. Clicker training by most accounts is very effective and easy.

Chewing could be because her teeth are still coming through. Chew toys will help her to learn that there is something there specifically for chewing, and shoudl hopefully redirect her. I highly recommend you get her a kong! Our dog loves his plus its apparently good for their teeth and gums. And keeps doggy quiet for a wee while!

Agility training is not normally recommended till the dog is about 18 months old. Gives their bones etc time to grow properly, less risk of injury etc. If you think she'd be good at it, go for it. It'd be excellent body and mind exercise for her.
 

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my biggest advice for dogs is EXERCISE! If shes worn out shes too tired to be getting into something she shouldn't and will be much easier to train.

Other than that "The dog listener" is an excellent book, that really helped get my parents adult dogs back on track. If I remember correctly there is a whole section on starting with a new puppy so it should really help you out. Good luck, she's adorable.
 

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Young puppies just chew. On everthing. As for biting you, when she does it, say "ow" loudly and then ignore her for a few minutes. That's the way her littermates would handle it. Yelp and then stop playing for a while. When she's about 6-8 months old, she'll get her adult teeth and chewing will be a problem again then. Puppies can certainly learn some items are okay to chew, others aren't. Stop her whenever she's chewing the furniture and give her something appropriate to chew.

When dogs are that young, they basically have to be watched nonstop, just like babies. Or use a crate when you can't watch her. (That's not okay for babies, though.) Two of my dogs chewed up to about 2 years old, then just stopped. One went to about 3. Now all he destroys is rolls of toilet paper. My fourth dog, well, the crate is still our friend and probably will be until she's 10. I don't see her calming down before that.

I don't know a whole lot about clicker training, so I'm no help there. But 10 weeks is too young to expect her to learn too much of anything. Most "puppy kindergarten" dog training classes focus mostly on socialization and not learning a whole lot.

As for showing her who's in charge, I can't recommend The Dog Listener by Jan Fennel enough. Amazon.com has it.

And for the cat, when he's had enough, he'll probably teach her to stop better than you ever could, especially if he has claws. But stopping her every single time she annoys the cat is important. If they're playing together, that's one thing, but if she's just chasing or using the cat as a chew toy, don't let it happen. If she gets away with it once or twice, she'll keep trying again. If you call her away from the cat and she comes to you, give her a treat. I did that at first with the cat and one of my huskies. It worked part of the time. I finally resorted to dousing her with water for cat chasing, but she was much older than your dog, the cat didn't have front claws (not my doing) and the cat was at a real risk of serious injury. Teaching my dogs I had from 7 weeks old that the cat was off limits was much easier. And your dog won't grow big enough to kill a cat, unlike my husky. My dog was already over a year old when I got her and had come from an environment where she chased the cat all day while her previous owners worked. I'm really surprised they never came home to a disaster.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyFaile View Post

this is Halle


so i'm thinking agility training might be something she'd be good at down the road. when and how do we start something like that and what are the benefits as far as a family pet is concerned? and any tips on how to deal with bad behaviour? we've tried distracting her with toys or replacing objects she's chewing with chewtoys but someone suggested that we're just rewarding the chewing behaviour and that she won't understand that it's ok to chew one thing and another.

She is an absolutely gorgeous pup, one of my favourite breeds too!!!

I'm a vet nurse and we have a dog day care facility at work so I do alot of training with dogs every day. Many of them are puppies too so I can deifnitely relate to the things you are describing! A great idea would be for you to take her to puppy school. Alot of vet clnics run them and they are a great way for your pup to get socialised and for you to learn really good tips on how to train your pup. It would also be a good introduction to training for her.

My main suggestion for you is positive reinforcement - reward her for all the things she gets right. But when she is naughty, make sure to say a firm "no!".

In regards to distracting her when she is doing something wrong, I often find that an invaluable technique as it re-directs their behaviour. Make a big deal of her toys and make them an active part of her play time. She will start to learn the difference between her toys and the things that are off limits.

Good luck with it all, and enjoy your gorgeous new puppy!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks guys. that's the tactic we've been trying when it comes to her biting us, but she's now big enough to jump on and off the couch so when she's on our laps and biting we'll pull away and say 'ow!' and try to ignore her but she'll just go for different body parts and even jump for the neck and face. so we've tried that plus putting her down off the couch but she jumps right back up.

sometimes it works though, hubby said the other day when he did it and was ignoring her she just flopped down next to him and sulked lol.

i think dominance is going to be the key thing here because she's really starting to understand what no means and what she should and shouldn't be doing/chewing but she's testing us. sometimes she'll go to chew something and i can see her watching me out of the corner of her eye to see if i'm going to react. when i do she backs off for a second and then tries to get a few nips in at the object and then takes off when i make a move towards her.

she's getting better though the last few days, when i take something away and say no she won't keep going after it like she had been.

if only we could convince her that the newspapers she's supposed to pee on are not toys. that's getting pretty annoying. and the cat doesn't help because, well, try telling a cat he can't sit on newspaper right? she'll come along and jump on him and he'll flop over onto his back and it becomes a game. earlier she knocked him over and he rolled right through a fresh puddle that hadn't even soaked into the paper yet so he's going to need a bath which i'm sure will go over great
and the other day the puppy ran through a fresh poop and starting heading for the livingroom. i barely caught her before she hit carpet and washed off her feet but she tracked it all over the kitchen floor. that was fun. i just sprayed some bitter apple on the paper, the smell of it doesn't deter the puppy (the taste does) but it really deters the cat. so maybe if he smells it on the paper he won't be tempted to sit there. we'll see.

i find i'm really losing patience the last couple days and having a hard time controlling my anger. she got under the spare bed earlier and started chewing something, i couldn't see what so i was trying to coax her out and she wouldn't come. a couple times she's gotten into places i'd rather she not be just making a lot of noise startled her enough to run out, so i tried that and it didn't work.. i got so mad i yelled and tried to pull her out, she got scared and went way to the back where i couldn't reach her and just sat and watched me, i felt really bad. she still wouldn't come out, i ended up having to go out and close the door so i could cool off and eventually she realized she was locked in alone and whined to get out... and climbed into my lap and sulked lol.

i think she's going to be a really good dog when she grows up a bit, we just need to learn to be more patient with her til then. i feel bad for my downstairs neighbour having to listen to us yell all the time, and yelling doesn't seem to help anyway. i find when she's getting into mischief i get the most reaction out of her if i clap my hands really loud and say 'no' at the same time. we tried the can of pennies trick, which works great with the cat, but she didn't seem bothered. unusual noises intrigue her. if you whistle or make any kind of wierd noises with your mouth she'll get as close to your face as possible and watch you really carefully with her head cocked to one side, very cute
this is why we think the clicker is a good option for her. when she's housebroken we also want to teach her to shake a bell to let us know she needs to go out. if she responds well to sounds i think we should take advantage of it as much as possible lol.

as for the cat, i try to seperate them if the cat seems annoyed. he encourages her sometimes just by sitting near her and letting her jump on him instead of going for high ground, and sometimes wants to play with her, but when she starts jumping on him and pulling out fur he gets mad and pins her. i'm more afraid he'll hurt her than vise versa, he's a big cat and has done some damage to me a few times. it's hard to tell when he's playing and when he's mad though, he doesn't puff up and his ears usually don't go back, and most of the time he doesn't use claws. i think he's irritated but understands that she's a baby and he's big enough to hurt her. now and then he really lets her have it but she doesn't get it. hubby says we should let them fight a bit while we're there to supervise so she learns, and that after he scratchers a couple times she'll figure it out, but i don't really want it to come to that, i don't want to have to explain to my vet why the puppy's eyes are scratched up or something. but really the only time he's growled at her is when she's bugging him while he's eating. i'm not sure what he'd do if she kept at him at that point, when i hear him growl i grab her and take her to another room and play with her.

making a big deal of her toys lol... yeah i just figured that out the last couple of days too. i keep trying to distract her with toys when she's hassling the cat but she'll just grab the toy and take it TO the cat lol. so i've figured out that the best way to make her toy really appealing is to not give it to her lol. i'll get her attention and drag it across the floor back and forth til she tries to come get it and then i'll keep moving it away from her so she's running and jumping all over trying to take it from me. when i eventually let her have it she'll go sit in a corner and chew it for a good while.

she has:

a rope (one of those braided knotted ones for tugging)

a bone-shaped kong that you can put treats in

a stuffed fish that squeeks

a cloth frisbee which we keep having to take away cause she's trying to rip it apart lol

and a hard rubber ball with a bell in it

she loves them all and sometimes can amuse herself with them long enough for us to get some dishes done or something lol but next thing we know the cat's walked by or she's gotten an energy burst and is tearing around the place or a pillow became interesting all of a sudden... i really think she'll outgrow it.

how long does paper training usually take anyway?

oy and hubby is going to visit his family for easter, i have to work so i'm not going. he's taking her with him. so yay i get a break. plus she'll meet a bunch of new people which is good cause she seems nervous around new people right now so we're trying to socialize her as much as possible. aaaand his brother just got a puppy this past weekend, so she'll meet her too. she'll be a bit bigger i think so we're hoping she won't be too rough, they'll be supervised at all times and there's a tiled room they can block her into overnight with the gate. he said he's going to really work at the paper training while they're there. and i'm going to make sure he takes pictures of the playdate, i'll try to post some
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
pupper still has kennel cough and it's highly contagious so hubby isn't taking her up north for the weekend so we don't give it to the other puppy. i don't mind staying home with her but it means leaving her alone all day while i'm at work. so far she's only been left alone for about 5 hours max because hubby gets home before me. today's a short shift but tomorrow and sunday are 9 hours shifts. i feel bad leaving her that long
i could stop in on my lunch break but it really only gives me a few minutes with her and then back in the crate, i think it's more upsetting for her than just staying at work.
 

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that is such a cute puppy. i have a 5 month golden retriever and he is the best. he also went through this.

1) all puppies chew, especially when they are at the first stages of teething like your puppy

2) boredom: keep them entertained ; exercise, play , etc

3) dont make any acceptions : if you see your puppy chewin on the shoe and think its cute, dont let her JUST THIS ONCE, because she will think of that as a gateway to shoe chewing heaven.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well. she's still not papertrained, she's still harassing the cat, and chewing everything.

i checked a bookstore for that book and they were out, i'm trying the library today.

the cat is being too tolerant, i think he realizes that she's a baby and smaller than him so he won't do anything to hurt her. he's made her yelp a couple times but watching them go at it it's pretty clear that she thinks he's playing. he gives a typical cat warning, he'll put one paw over the back of her neck and then flop onto his side pulling her down with him and then he'll bite the back of her neck but not hard enough to hurt her. with another cat this would work great. but the dog thinks it's a pretty fun game. i get the feeling she sees him as a giant moving squeek toy. when he meows or growls a warning to back off it just encourages her to jump at him more.

it doesn't help that a cat being threatening is laying on the side, whereas a dog being submissive is laying on the side. the dog thinks the cat is being submissive, when the cat thinks he's being badass. so she responds by standing over him (though because she's so much smaller it's more like standing ON him)
 

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Originally Posted by LadyFaile View Post

he's made her yelp a couple times but watching them go at it it's pretty clear that she thinks he's playing. he gives a typical cat warning, he'll put one paw over the back of her neck and then flop onto his side pulling her down with him and then he'll bite the back of her neck but not hard enough to hurt her.
You just described my huskies. They wrestle like that with each other all day long. You're totally right about cats and dogs sending mixed signals. Your cat either needs to take some classes in how to speak Dog, or just give the puppy a good swat on the nose. Too bad my cat can't send him some tips. He spent the first years of his life living on the streets and can whip just about any dog into shape in less than two minutes.

You'll have to be patient with the paper training and chewing. She's still very young. Are you keeping her crated or otherwise confined any time you can't watch her every move?
 

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Skip the paper training and go straight to house breaking. Paper training can slow down the process. You can leave papers down in her crate for easier pickup (she's going to have accidents if left alone more than 5 hours), but don't encourage her to go on the papers, encourage her to go outside.

As for the other issues, you need to be more insistent. If the dog jumps on the couch and you didn't call her up, pick her up and put her on the floor. If she jumps back up, repeat the process until she gets the hint. It may take 15 times before the dog gives up jumping up on the couch. If you see her start to look at the couch longingly correct her right then before she jumps up. .... Same thing with getting it to stop bugging the cat. ... Dogs will test your patience. And if you have less patience than they do, they'll take over the house. If you give up and let the dog win, the dog learns that persistence is the key to getting what it wants. If you get angry and start yelling the dog begins to think you're crazy and misinterprets all your actions. So try to remain calm, patient, and persistent in everything you do with the puppy so that it can learn that you're in charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
we got a few books and they contradict each other so badly. some say don't confine or leave the pup alone too much at first or they won't bond and socialize and have anxiety problems later. others say keep them confined 24/7 til they're paper trained.

we keep her confined to the kitchen overnight and when we're not home but when we're home and up we let her out. sometimes she's too quick for us or we'll turn our backs for a second and bingo she's peein on the floor
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
sorry that was in response to wolfie's post.

kpickell: thanks. we were actually just talking about this, that we should not focus so much on paper training and start bringing her outside after meals and playing and sleeping, and just stay out til she goes. she's still young yes but the books all say her most impressionable stage is up to 16 weeks and after that point training becomes harder. so we have 3 weeks left to fit as much into that little brain as possible. so we want to try to step up the housebreaking to the next level. problem with that is it's still fairly chilly outside and her kennel cough has developed into pneumonia. just got the xrays done today and started new antibiotics. the vet says it's not really bad and she is coughing a lot of the fluid up which is a good sign but we don't particularly want to force her to go outside in the cold with pneumonia, i don't think it'd help matters much. so we're hoping it warms up over the next couple of days so we can start taking her outside.

as for couch we have no problem with her being on the couch actually, we're not the type to have 'no pets on the furniture' rules. they're like our kids and we wouldn't ban our kids from snuggling on the couch with us to watch tv etc. we eat on the couch for most meals so that's a bit awkward but she doesn't beg or try to get into our plates, if she does sniff at them we say no and pull her away, usually once is enough and she'll just lie down. as long as i can physically get the food from table to mouth with her on me i don't really care. if i can't i put her next to me.

so yeah we're not that strict about stuff like that as long as she behaves. if she starts chewing on the couch we put her on the floor and give her a toy. it works usually, we just can't leave her unattended for too long in the livingroom cause she chews the cushions and stuff but if we're with her it's fine. meh.

her and the cat had a good wrestling session earlier, the cat pinned her on her back and bit the scruff of her neck so he's maybe learning what he's supposed to do..
 

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Originally Posted by LadyFaile View Post

we got a few books and they contradict each other so badly. some say don't confine or leave the pup alone too much at first or they won't bond and socialize and have anxiety problems later. others say keep them confined 24/7 til they're paper trained.

we keep her confined to the kitchen overnight and when we're not home but when we're home and up we let her out. sometimes she's too quick for us or we'll turn our backs for a second and bingo she's peein on the floor
Anything I've ever read has said confine them anytime you can't watch their every move. Of course, I've known people that got puppies and then confined them while they worked and went to school 18 hours a day. That's when you run into socialization issues. Obviously if you're that busy, you shouldn't get a dog in the first place. (By "you" I don't mean you--I mean the former owners of one of my dogs.) Confining her so she can't pee all over the house when you can't watch her shouldn't be a problem, as long as she's getting plenty of attention and socialization otherwise.

When you catch her peeing on the floor, clap or make a loud noise to get her to stop, then take her outside to finish the job and give her lots of treats and praise. If you have a newspaper that she's peed on before, putting it outside will help her learn that's the proper place.

One thing about paper training is when she's older and going outside all the time, she still might pee on the Sunday news if you leave it on the floor.

Controlling access to the couch like KP mentioned will tell her you're in charge of the good stuff. It will help her to see you as the leader. You can still let her get on the furniture, but only after you give her permission to do so.

I hope she gets over her pneumonia soon.
 

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Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

Dogs will test your patience. And if you have less patience than they do, they'll take over the house.
That made me laugh. It's so true. Especially if one has huskies!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
isn't that confusing though to not let her on and then tell her it's ok? basically any time i'm on the couch i like her to be with me because then i know exactly where she is and what she's doing. odds are good if i'm not on the couch neither is she, she really only goes up there for attention and to sleep in warm laps
if she wants to play she plays on the floor and i often sit on the floor to play with her instead of reaching down from the couch so she doesn't think the couch is a play area.

right so we confine her when we're out or sleeping. the rest of the time we are there to watch her every move but there are still going to be times that we look away. i can't say 'hey i'm going to answer the phone i better take 5 minutes to set up the gate and put her in the kitchen first', that's just sort of not reasonable. we do watch her and if we think she's looking for a place to 'go' we take her to the kitchen and hang out there til she goes. sometimes she doesn't though, she gets distracted by whatever and starts playing and 5 minutes later we'll catch her out of the corner of our eye but too late to grab her.

anyway we're borrowing a carpet cleaner this weekend, we're hoping getting the scent out of the carpet will help. if she can smell where she's gone before she'll just keep going there. so we've been trying to keep a soiled piece of newspaper under the clean ones so she can smell it and know where she is supposed to go. it does work for the most part but again if we aren't standing right beside her to praise her she doesn't seem to care. i thought about keeping her leashed so she can't get out of my sight but she runs around a lot when she's playing and i don't want her to think she's not allowed to do that.

meh. we'll figure it out. right now we're more worried about getting her healthy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
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That made me laugh. It's so true. Especially if one has huskies!
yep lol it's true. i had a couple of bad days where i really was losing patience and getting really angry and verbal when she was misbehaving but i realized all it was doing was upsetting her and not correcting the behaviour. i do NOT want my dog to be afraid of me, and i know that proper obedience training doesn't involve yelling. since i realized how i was reacting (and how it must sound to the neighbours lol) i've been a lot more patient and i think it's paying off. instead of reacting with negativity i'm putting the energy into making her toys seem absolutely irresistable. i've learned that the way to make her really want a toy is to not let her have it. i'll lightly bonk her with her stuffed toy until she nips at it and then raise it out of reach. she goes nuts til i give it to her and then will sit and play with it for a good while. so now when she's chewing at the couch or carpet i'll bop her with her toy til she decides it's more fun and then praise her when she takes it. i think we're making progress
 

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yep lol it's true. i had a couple of bad days where i really was losing patience and getting really angry and verbal when she was misbehaving but i realized all it was doing was upsetting her and not correcting the behaviour. i do NOT want my dog to be afraid of me, and i know that proper obedience training doesn't involve yelling. since i realized how i was reacting (and how it must sound to the neighbours lol) i've been a lot more patient and i think it's paying off. instead of reacting with negativity i'm putting the energy into making her toys seem absolutely irresistable. i've learned that the way to make her really want a toy is to not let her have it. i'll lightly bonk her with her stuffed toy until she nips at it and then raise it out of reach. she goes nuts til i give it to her and then will sit and play with it for a good while. so now when she's chewing at the couch or carpet i'll bop her with her toy til she decides it's more fun and then praise her when she takes it. i think we're making progress


how do you think Havoc got his name.

 
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