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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've just started jogging regularly in the last month or so. I just do laps around my neighborhood. I drove a lap, to see what my car's odometer said the distance was, and it's between 8/10 and 9/10 of a mile, probably a little closer to 9/10, so I call it .85 miles per lap.

When I first started, I could barely finish one lap. I've been jogging 3-5 times per week for about 4 or 5 weeks now, I bought real running shoes, and I even bought an armband for my iPod to help keep me going. Now, I've can make it two laps around fairly often, though sometimes I get worn out before I get that far. Once, around 2 weeks ago, I managed 3 laps, but I haven't been able to go more than 2 laps since then. I'm not sure how I managed it that day.

So I've got some relatively stupid newbie questions.

I'm trying to learn to pace myself and breathe properly to increase my time and distance that I can keep going. How exactly should I be breathing? I try to breathe with my mouth only while I run, not my nose, and it seems that long, slow breathes are better. Am I way off base?

Also, I'm trying to figure out why sometimes I do much worse than usual. For instance, last Wednesday and Thursday, I ran two laps both days with no problem. I took Friday off. Saturday, I only did about half a lap before I stopped to walk the rest of the lap, but that was due to eating about an hour before, so my stomach cramped. Usually I eat after running, not before, so now I know not to make exceptions. I thought an hour to digest would be enough, but apparently not. Today (Sunday), I went out jogging again, and again I was unable to complete the first lap, though I made it further than yesterday. This time I was just out of breathe, so I alternated walking and running, to finish two laps total, with maybe 1 1/3 laps of jogging, and only 2/3 of a lap walking.

I'm not sure why I'm doing so much worse this weekend than I was just a few days ago, but I do have a theory. I donated blood on Friday. Could that have an impact?

Also, so far I've been judging my progress according to how many laps I can do around the neighborhood. I go as far as I can jogging, then walk, then sometimes start jogging again and alternate until I finish the lap. Is it better to aim for specific distances jogging, or amounts of time? Also, I was thinking that maybe adding an extra lap of walking at the end might help me get used to going further distances, so it might help my jogging endurance. What do you think?

Any advice would be appreciated.

--Fromper

 

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Donating blood has a HUGE impact on your workout! Give yourself about 3-4 days to recover.

As for breathing, some say that if you have to breathe through your mouth you are working too hard. I find it difficult, though, to just breathe through my nose. You might concentrate on matching your breathing to your footsteps. I tend to breathe in over two steps, and breathe out over two steps. So if you think step step, step step, step step, step step -- that was breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out. That will change depending on your pace.

As for endurance, there was a thread a little while ago about programs. This is similar to the program I really like: http://www.marathontraining.com/marathon/m_mile.html. It's a marathon training program, so obviously you don't have to do the entire thing if you only want to run like 3 miles. But it has some great concepts, especially for phase I.

This might be more suitable: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/...-203-0,00.html

and here are some great tips for newbies:

http://www.runnersworld.com/subtopic...-386-0,00.html

Good luck. I can't say enough how important it is to have comfortable gear (cotton shirts are BAAAAAD!). Tech shirts, dual-layer socks, the right shoes (go to a running store!) - they make ALL the difference in the world.
 

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Oh, and it's okay to walk. On my short runs, I try not to walk at all. However, on my longer runs I know that I need to give my body a little rest, so I will stop to walk about every 3 miles. I walk for about 30 seconds then run again. It saves me in the long run. (lol)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info and links. I was wondering why I was having such a hard time jogging today, and it wasn't until after the fact that I thought about the blood donation on Friday. That was part of the reason I didn't exercise on Friday, besides figuring I should take a day off after 2 days of good jogging.

That's interesting about breathing through the mouth. It just seemed natural to me. I'll try breathing through my nose next time and see how it goes. As for the breathing rate, I think I'm going about the pace you said - two steps inhaling, then two steps exhaling. I'll pay more attention next time.

For equipment, I already bought New Balance running shoes last week, which have helped immensely. They might not be the best possible shoes for me technically, because I just bought anything that felt comfortable instead of going to a specialty store, but they've definitely helped. Before that, I was jogging in the same tennis shoes that I just wear casually whenever I walk around in jeans. These are MUCH better, obviously.

I don't know about other equipment. I just wear generic shorts and t-shirts when I jog. I never thought about layering socks. I have thick tube socks, so I figure they give me enough padding, but I guess if I start running longer at once, I might want to double up.

Again, thanks for the info. I'm still reading all the articles on that site. There's some useful stuff there.

--Fromper

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonAmy View Post

Donating blood has a HUGE impact on your workout! Give yourself about 3-4 days to recover.

As for breathing, some say that if you have to breathe through your mouth you are working too hard. I find it difficult, though, to just breathe through my nose. You might concentrate on matching your breathing to your footsteps. I tend to breathe in over two steps, and breathe out over two steps. So if you think step step, step step, step step, step step -- that was breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out. That will change depending on your pace.

As for endurance, there was a thread a little while ago about programs. This is similar to the program I really like: http://www.marathontraining.com/marathon/m_mile.html. It's a marathon training program, so obviously you don't have to do the entire thing if you only want to run like 3 miles. But it has some great concepts, especially for phase I.

This might be more suitable: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/...-203-0,00.html

and here are some great tips for newbies:

http://www.runnersworld.com/subtopic...-386-0,00.html

Good luck. I can't say enough how important it is to have comfortable gear (cotton shirts are BAAAAAD!). Tech shirts, dual-layer socks, the right shoes (go to a running store!) - they make ALL the difference in the world.


I do the same breathing pattern. And my breaths are more shallow-ish and less like panting or deep breaths. In-in, out-out, in-in, out-out. etc.

The rhythm of the breaths matches that of your feet hitting the ground.

I find it easiest (for myself anyway) to breathe Miyagi style (lol) in through the nose, and out through the mouth.

And (referencing OA's second post) I'm not afraid to stop and walk either if I feel myself getting overheated or fatigued. This obviously happens more often in higher temperatures than it does on milder, 70-degree days.

Just listen to your body. Don't push it too hard. It's fine to push a little (think: little goals!) but don't do too much too soon. You'll just end up hurting and being unable to run for a while if you do.

And that's no fun!
 

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By dual-layer socks, I meant socks like this: http://www.wrightsock.com/anti-blister.html

Once you start going more than 3-4 miles (if you do), ditch the cotton socks. They'll give you blisters and won't wick moisture away from your feet. And the dual-layer socks will seem like a gift from heaven to your feet!


Good job on the NB shoes. Remember that once you put about 300-500 miles on your shoes to get a new pair. Or, when your feet are getting fatigued quickly when you run. Here's a good article on shoes: http://www.aapsm.org/selectingshoes.html.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonAmy View Post

By dual-layer socks, I meant socks like this: http://www.wrightsock.com/anti-blister.html

Once you start going more than 3-4 miles (if you do), ditch the cotton socks. They'll give you blisters and won't wick moisture away from your feet. And the dual-layer socks will seem like a gift from heaven to your feet!


Good job on the NB shoes. Remember that once you put about 300-500 miles on your shoes to get a new pair. Or, when your feet are getting fatigued quickly when you run. Here's a good article on shoes: http://www.aapsm.org/selectingshoes.html.
i agree 100% on the sox and the shoes! i like my NB's!
 

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When I run, I breathe in through my nose and out through my mouth. It's always worked great for me. Helps to keep my mouth getting dried out too quickly.
 

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I don't even think about how I breathe when I run, I am pretty sure that most of the time I breathe through my mouth. The breathing thing will get easier with time.

I do know this though: when you run your long runs, basically any distance you do not normally do, you are supposed to be able to have a full out conversation with somebody while you run. If you are having trouble breathing, try slowing down. After you build up some distance, you can add speed work to speed up.

Walk breaks are not a bad idea, especially when trying to build endurance. Some runners like to run for 5 minutes, walk 1 minute. Some run 1 mile, walk a minute. You could try running 1 lap and then walking a minute. Being able to have that walk will help motivate you do go an extra lap.

Runners sometimes have days where they don't feel as good as others. It happens and it happens often. Just go with the flow. Amy already mentioned that donating blood would have an impact. Lack of sleep, eating worse than usual, less that usual, being stressed out, being dehydrated, etc will all affect your running.

Good luck with your running!
 

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What I've found most useful is breathing in through one nostril and then out the other.

I wonder about that. Why do we have two nostrils? I don't buy the whole idea of stereoscopic smelling ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by ritesh View Post

What I've found most useful is breathing in through one nostril and then out the other.

I wonder about that. Why do we have two nostrils? I don't buy the whole idea of stereoscopic smelling ...
It's so we can still breathe through the nose, even when we've got a stuffy nose on one side. My bird does that. He's 21 years old (average life span for a cockatiel is supposedly around 10-15), and he's had sinus problems for years. He seems to sneeze out the right side regularly, and the left side stays stuffed up until I take him to the vet to get his nose picked.

--Fromper

 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newveggirl82 View Post

When I run, I breathe in through my nose and out through my mouth. It's always worked great for me. Helps to keep my mouth getting dried out too quickly.
This is how I breathe, too...otherwise, I feel kind of winded and tend to get side cramps (not sure if breathing technique has anything to do with that, but it's just what I've noticed)
 
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