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As linked from the aggregate site V<a href="http://vegan.com/blog/2011/06/29/new-iodine-info-from-jack-norris/" target="_blank">egan.com</a><br><br>
The relevant part of the medical findings:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>In a 2011 cross-sectional study from the Boston area, urinary iodine levels of 78 lacto-ovo vegetarians and 62 vegans were measured (1). People with previously diagnosed thyroid problems were excluded from the study. <b>According to the authors, Population iodine sufficiency is defined by median urinary iodine concentrations 100 µg/l or greater in adults and 150 µg/l or greater in pregnancy. Median urinary iodine concentration of vegans (79 µg/l; range 7 965 µg/l) was significantly lower than vegetarians (147 µg/l; range 9 779 µg/l). Markers of thyroid function were similar in both groups and in the normal range; one vegan and no vegetarians had abnormal thyroid function. <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Most of the vegans were making no effort to insure adequate iodine intake.</span></b></i></div>
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Erik Marcus' imput:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Its a safe bet that some vegans never eat processed food (much of which surely contains iodized salt), take a multivitamin, eat seaweed, or use iodized salt. <b>These people are on a collision course with iodine deficiency.</b></div>
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Yikes. Apparently we have another nutrient we should ensure we're getting enough of. B12 and Vitamin D are the missing links in many vegans' diets, but if this study is any indication there's a lot of vegans not getting enough iodine either. It never specified just exactly what's meant by "vegan" in this instance. I would imagine raw foodists or fruitarians, especially those who refuse to tale supplements or use table salt, would be at a higher risk than a vegan who eats more processed foods. But since I can't find anywhere in the actual story that makes a distinction that's just a guess.
 

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I wouldn't worry about this much, at all.<br><br>
first of all the study was tiny, only 140 people total and only about half were vegan. second is that they used a urine test to determine iodine levels, which only shows recently consumed iodine.<br><br>
lastly, if you use iodized salt (extremely common in the US, most table salt has iodine) you are getting more than enough iodine just from salt.
 

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I take 2 kelp tablets a week and I switched to iodised salt instead of sea salt recently too. I read that vegans should take a source of iodine on The Vegan Society website when I first went vegan.
 

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very interesting study. Luvourmother makes a good point, but I know that I personally use kosher salt far more than iodized table salt. However, the last blood test I had didn't bring that up as an issue.
 

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Also switched to iodized salt here a while ago. Thanks for the info, Josh James.
 

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This was one of our concerns recently, re dietary needs. I was taking an iodine supplement, but have switched to a multi with iodine (IS takes one as well). Iodized salt is not really available here, though we brought some back from Norway last year.
 

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these foods are also a source of iodine, eat these regularly and no worries about this at all:<br><br>
asparagus, fennel, radish, mushrooms, garlic, seaweed, onions, eggplant and potatoes.<br><br>
growing veggies in iodine rich soil also increases the amt of iodine available in the plants
 

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See, there's the trouble. The amount of iodine in vegetables varies enormously, due primarily to the soil content.
 

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Strawberries are supposed to be a good source of iodine as well, but personally I just use a three-seaweed blend to ensure enough iodine. It's a soil issue, from my understanding, much like B12.
 

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I have no idea what kind of salt is in the food I eat but I do take a daily multivitamin with iodine so I should be good to go.
 

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Everyone needs to worry about iodine, not just vegans. That's why they iodize salt.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>IamJen</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2926905"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
See, there's the trouble. The amount of iodine in vegetables varies enormously, due primarily to the soil content.</div>
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Yes, that's the problem. Some soils, worldwide, are very deficient in iodine. I've written about this in other forums. Iodized salt is the easy solution. You don't need much.<br><br>
Selenium is also a consideration re soil content. (Don't forget your Brazil nuts.)
 

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Erik Marcus says is that vegans who don't carefully monitor their iodine intake "are on a collision course with iodine deficiency."<br><br>
But the study actually says that although vegans' median urinary iodine concentration was lower than nonvegans the "markers of thyroid function were similar in both groups and <b>in the normal range</b>".<br>
link: <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21613354/" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21613354/</a><br><br>
So, kids, let's put on our thinking caps. Rather than jumping to the conclusion that vegans are at serious risk of iodine deficiency and scare-mongering about it, let's explore alternative theories.<br>
-perhaps the sample size is too small<br>
-Perhaps vegans tend to get enough iodine to prevent problems.<br>
-Perhaps vegans tend to use iodine more efficiently and don't need as much iodine to ward off thyroid problems as nonvegans need.<br>
-Perhaps measuing iodine in urine isn't all that accurate. Or perhaps it's more accurate for nonvegans than vegans.<br>
-Perhaps earlier experiments that associated low iodine intake with thyroid and other problems missed some other, more substantial influential factors. That is, perhaps it's merely correlation and not causation, at least in the case of certain diets/lifestyles. (Remember, some if not most of these experiments were done on nonhuman animals and we know that those aren't always accurate.)<br><br>
Of course, there's still the possibility that vegans tend to be at higher risk of iodine deficiency than nonvegans and it's probably still a good idea to encourage vegans not to be too strict about their diet and to allow some table salt, however, there's obviously no good reason to go around making a huge fuss about this. The scare-mongering rarely reaches the people who need to hear it and instead it just gives anti-vegans yet another rationalization.
 

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Raw foodists generally eat seaweed farely often. I eat dulse flakes in my salad almost daily. I'm not raw but I try to eat a big raw salad at least everday. Also when I make food I usually use pink salt which I don't think contains iodine.
 

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Scare tactics...sigh.
 

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I usually cook with iodized salt in a smaller amt than a recipe calls for. and if more needs to get added, it's usually pink salt too. I'm sure we get enough, as you really don't need much. If you anything out of a container, you're pretty much guaranteed to be getting iodized salt.
 

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ridiculous, to measure urine levels and use that as a basis for deficiency. if that's the case, why don't most here have problems and symptoms? i have to wonder who is paying for this "science".
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>sequoia</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2927369"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Scare tactics...sigh.</div>
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Unreasonable levels of contentment...sigh<br><br>
Ginny Messina: <i>I’m proud to be picky about vegan nutrition. It doesn’t sit well with everyone, but that’s okay. Brushing off legitimate questions about vegan nutrition may make it look easier to go vegan, but in the long run, it compromises our credibility. And if it increases the chance that vegans will develop health problems and return to eating meat and cheese—then it fails vegans and it fails animals. All of us who advocate for animals have an obligation to help vegans stay healthy.</i><br><br><br>
Now let me ask you something. Is there any legitimate reason why you feel we shouldn't at least check our own diets to make sure we're getting enough iodine every day? Or does the magic vegan bullet take care of everything, like some people supposedly claim it does with B12 and calcium?
 

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Josh, Of course dietitians will defend their jobs. That's their job. It doesn't surprise me that Ginny Messina would write that. Some people are so worried about their credibility as a vegan dietitian that they become biased in the other direction and don't see nutritional studies clearly. It's one thing to share info from a recent study. It's another thing to overgeneralize and scare-monger as a result of that one study.<br><br>
Nutrition is a young science and there's lots to learn. We need more studies and we need to analyze them carefully. But anyone who has been vegetarian or vegan for a while (3 decades and counting) will see a sort of wave pattern where certain nutrients get a lot of attention. People right now are going nutso over omega3s, D, iodine but not long ago they worried about something else and not too far in the future they will be worried about something else still. All the while, vegans and vegetarians will likely enjoy similar health and life-spans as nonveg*ns.<br><br>
I'm not saying that veganism is some sort of "magic bullet" or that there isn't plenty to learn. What I'm saying is that the evidence thus far doesn't actually show that we need to go on a rampage warning vegans to check their iodine levels. There just isn't enough evidence to suggest that doing so would save or improve one single human life. Certainly, if this interests you or if you're a dietitian and someone asks specific questions, by all means share the info. But to say that "vegans are on a collision course for iodine deficiency" or that "it appears that vegans have not yet gotten the message about the importance of iodine" isn't true.<br><br>
By jumping to conclusions about the overall health of all vegans from one small study - a study that didn't actually show any declining health - is not actually helpful. It just isn't. We need to be skeptical about all nutirional claims, not just the ones that confirm our own biases and certainly not just the ones that confirm the biases of anti-vegans.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2929145"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Unreasonable levels of contentment...sigh<br><br>
Ginny Messina: <i>I’m proud to be picky about vegan nutrition. It doesn’t sit well with everyone, but that’s okay. Brushing off legitimate questions about vegan nutrition may make it look easier to go vegan, but in the long run, it compromises our credibility. And if it increases the chance that vegans will develop health problems and return to eating meat and cheese—then it fails vegans and it fails animals. All of us who advocate for animals have an obligation to help vegans stay healthy.</i><br><br><br>
Now let me ask you something. Is there any legitimate reason why you feel we shouldn't at least check our own diets to make sure we're getting enough iodine every day? Or does the magic vegan bullet take care of everything, like some people supposedly claim it does with B12 and calcium?</div>
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I am annoyed that this is always framed as a vegan issue, when it is a human issue. Meat eaters are just as prone to iodine, B12, D, calcium, and iron deficiency. That's why major food manufacturers fortify all kinds of foods with these and more. Meat consumption isn't a magic bullet either, but making it look like vegans need to worry about all this stuff implies that no one else needs to.
 
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