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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok so me and my girl really want another fluffy friend in our house we have been thinking about it for a good 8 months, but after looking after our neighbors dog while they went on holiday in December we decided we definitely want to get one so we went to battersea dogs to see if we could adopt one they came round to our house asked general questions about work and uni etc and basically they said no. Anyway were getting one anyway regardless of what they said we would of liked to adopt one that needed a home so were just going to buy one and we need some help we have done lots of research on these dogs I'm about to list. (these are the ones we really like)

english springer spaniel (same as our neigbours)
siberian husky
golden retriever
great dane
english setter
Bergamasco (don't know much about this breed only seen it once before)
canaan

We both really prefer dogs larger than the spaniel but having the experience with them is making them a front runner plus they are a bundle of fun and really clever lol. What we really want to know is which breeds of dogs are good for first time owners (you can suggest breed not on the list) we have a rabbit and cat here as well plus lots of neighbors with dogs, we both finish uni in a few months so were looking at getting a dog pretty soon and going traveling with the dog when its big enough, we live in London we have a garden and are both very sporty my girl does lots of rollerblading and I do lots of boxing and rugby so keeping the dog active wont be a prob, but I know some dogs really just need space and find it hard in a city.

Any advice is valued, thanks in advance.
 

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First, there are other shelters that are more lenient. Please do not write off adoption just because one organization denied your application. Try other organizations.

Next, what was their reason for denial? Too much work/school? Landlord won't approve/you don't own your home? Fence around yard isn't secure? Whatever it was, seriously think about whether or not you can/should fix the issue. If you have a busy schedule could you use doggy daycare? Or get a dogwalker to come once a day around lunch?

About breeds: go more on energy level/metabolism and size than the other stuff. Personality varies greatly within the same breed. Looks ultimately don't matter much except for shedding/allergies. Focus on how much you're willing/able to exercise your dog. That's going to be the most important thing in determining a good match.

Whatever you do, find a good program to help you train your dog with positive training. You'll need to teach him/her where to potty, how to behave around strangers, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElaineV View Post

First, there are other shelters that are more lenient. Please do not write off adoption just because one organization denied your application. Try other organizations.
Next, what was their reason for denial? Too much work/school? Landlord won't approve/you don't own your home? Fence around yard isn't secure? Whatever it was, seriously think about whether or not you can/should fix the issue. If you have a busy schedule could you use doggy daycare? Or get a dogwalker to come once a day around lunch?
I completely agree with Elaine.


I just adopted two rescue dogs and I live near London so there are a lot more rescue centres than just Battersea. I looked at a lot of different websites like the Mayhew, Lea Valley, Enfield Dog Rescue, Pro Dogs Direct, All Dogs Matter and also Dogs Blog and Dog Pages Forums have details of dogs needing homes in the London area.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lorenzo View Post

ok so me and my girl really want another fluffy friend in our house we have been thinking about it for a good 8 months, but after looking after our neighbors dog while they went on holiday in December we decided we definitely want to get one so we went to battersea dogs to see if we could adopt one they came round to our house asked general questions about work and uni etc and basically they said no. Anyway were getting one anyway regardless of what they said we would of liked to adopt one that needed a home so were just going to buy one and we need some help we have done lots of research on these dogs I'm about to list. (these are the ones we really like)

english springer spaniel (same as our neigbours)
siberian husky
golden retriever
great dane
english setter
Bergamasco (don't know much about this breed only seen it once before)
canaan

We both really prefer dogs larger than the spaniel but having the experience with them is making them a front runner plus they are a bundle of fun and really clever lol. What we really want to know is which breeds of dogs are good for first time owners (you can suggest breed not on the list) we have a rabbit and cat here as well plus lots of neighbors with dogs, we both finish uni in a few months so were looking at getting a dog pretty soon and going traveling with the dog when its big enough, we live in London we have a garden and are both very sporty my girl does lots of rollerblading and I do lots of boxing and rugby so keeping the dog active wont be a prob, but I know some dogs really just need space and find it hard in a city.

Any advice is valued, thanks in advance.
Where a bouts do you live if you don't mind me asking? You could possibly try Chilterns Dog Rescue.
http://www.chilternsdogrescue.org.uk/

They seem to be a bit more open minded with homing criteria. They still want good homes for their dogs but don't seem to be bound by silly rules.
Thats not to say that Batterseas reasons for turning you down were silly reasons.
To be honest, from your post I was left wondering if you are about to finish Uni then why not wait until you are sure what changes are going to happen in your life first? You might end up taking a job abroad for example or have to travel a lot, what would happen to the dog then?
Maybe fostering a dog would be a good option for you. That way you are truly helping too.

What were their reasons for you being turned down?
I was also turned away by Battersea a few years back because I worked full time.
I wanted to help a staffy and they they put down so many staffies every day.
Even though I was prepared to pay for a dog walker, which I suggested to them.

I kept searching and eventually found a rescue that saw that I would be able to offer a good home.
I think they appreciated my honesty, I didn't have to tell them I worked full time but I wanted to find a dog that would suit what I could offer it.

Rescue Remedies rehome around London. http://www.rescueremedies.co.uk/

I have always been of the opinion that even if you work full time that is much better for a dog than being put to sleep.
As long as provisions are made for the dog like arranging for a dog walker to take the dog out when nobody can be at home for it.
Or doggy day care.

I have dog rescues listed by area for the whole of the UK. So take a look and see where your nearest ones are.
http://www.shelter-helper.co.uk/

Above all else. Please don't give up and go to a breeder. If you truly want to save a dog then it really is worth waiting for the right dog to come along. There are many more places you could try besides Battersea. Just stay patient and honest with the dog rescues. The right dog will come along and it will be one of the most rewarding things you ever do.
 

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I've had a Springer Spaniel and I currently have an English Setter (see avatar, lol), I also have a Brittany. Anyway I love these breeds but be forewarned they are active dogs and a bit high strung. Ideally you would have access to some fields where you could let the dog run free.

They do take to crate training well for when you are not at home. I always give them a treat. When I grab my coat they are patiently waiting in their crates for me to lock them in. (No way I'd let those two terrors run loose in the house when I'm not around)


Edit to add: The English Setter does bark to distraction when he's in the yard... not good we have birds and trees, enough said.
 

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Labs are the most popular breed here in the US, and for very good reason - they're great dogs! They tend to be wild puppies, but usually settle down into really excellent family dogs. There are always exceptions, but labs just generally seem to do well with nearly everyone - even cats and bunnies. They're generally eager to please, so that makes them pretty easy to train. And there are a lot of labs and lab mixes in shelters.


Good luck!

eta: I thought you said labs when you said goldens - sorry! Goldens are completely wonderful dogs too, and they have the fluffy factor you like!
 

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I agree with the others. Try another rescue/shelter. Don't buy!

Since you have a cat and a rabbit, you would probably be better off with a young puppy so you can teach him from the start not to hunt your other pets. Or look for an adult dog who was raised around smaller animals. I don't know what it's like where you are, but here a lot of dogs available for adoption have a history the shelter worker can give you.

Siberian huskies have a strong prey drive. They also can never be trusted off leash. They were designed to run and to do so for long distances. They are very independent and do things their way. They are smart and will learn commands but if they get loose, they tend to listen to said commands only if they feel like it. They are usually very human friendly, even with strangers, and love kids. And they shed A LOT. If you can't stand living with hair everywhere, don't get a husky.

Golden retrievers are generally easy going and quick to follow commands. In general, they'd probably take to a cat or rabbit much easier than a husky. They tend to get along well with other dogs if socialized properly. They are an easier breed for a first timer than a husky would be.

Great danes are loyal family dogs but don't always take to strangers. They sometimes don't get along with other dogs, especially dogs of the same sex. Because of their size, their lifespan is relatively short compared to other dogs. If you do get a Great dane, educate yourself on gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV.) It's serious and affects Great danes more than any other breed.

Forster covered the spaniels and setters. They are hunting dogs, so they need to be active to be happy. And they may want to hunt your cat or rabbit.

I don't really know anything about the last two.

Lastly, don't rule out a mixed breed! Mutts rule! And are often healthier than purebred dogs.

Like Elaine said, all dogs are individuals so they don't always conform to breed standards. But knowing about the breed will give you a pretty decent idea of what you are getting into.
 

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First and foremost, why were you initially denied? And are you capable of correcting whatever it was to cause denial? Shelters are actively looking for homes for their animals, to be denied is not something to be overlooked. A home for any animal must be able to provide for the length of that animal's life.

Secondly, research temperment that you're looking for in a dog and choose a breed around that. I wanted a small, smart, active, playful dog that I could train its whole life and always be on my toes. I ended up with a jack russell/poodle mix.

Third, think really hard about how many homeless animals get out down because of over crowding and people throwing money at breeders, backyard or certified. Adopt. Humane societies, shelters, rescues, independently run fosters, there's enough options to avoid buying from a breeder.

Fourth, buy training books, I love the Puppy Primer and all from that author. Be prepared that training is an entire family ordeal and cannot be taken lightly or overlooked. Be prepared for sleepless nights, potty training, separation anxiety, buying a kennel, food transitions, vet visits, chewing, barking, marking, digging, etc. Training isn't easy and who knows what traits you'll need to overcome. But also know what natural traits come with that breed. Asking my jack mix to never bark is impossible, but I can train her when its appropriate to bark. Know exactly what you're getting yourself into with a breed and be prepared to compromise with those traits, because these traits had been cultivated in these breeds for such a long time that training a husky to not pull at all could be cruel. Teaching a husky that pulling you on a skateboard three times a week is compromise.
 

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Shelter? Rescue?
 

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I also want to add that if you're determined to get a purebred dog, many purebreds have genetic health issues such as hip dysplasia (common in large dogs), so you have to think about how much money you're willing to spend on this dog during its lifetime, and even though some breeds have shorter lifespans than other breeds, dogs can surprise people and live longer than expected, especially with a lot of good vet care. This means being willing to be able to afford expensive treatments and surgeries if a serious health problem occurs down the road.

ETA: You also have to factor in the cost of regular grooming if you get a high maintenance dog.
 

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As for getting rejected, you tried a rescue group, and it's a known fact that the people who run them are as nitpicky as they come. Try the shelter.

Don't get your heart set on one breed, go to any local shelter and find a dog that suits you. I was stuck on the idea of getting a beagle, but when I stopped by one of he shelters all the specifications for a dog pretty much flew out the window as you can find so many different kinds of dogs, both mutts and purebreds. In the end what matters is look, size and temperment. You'll be limiting yourself if you narrow it down to one breed.
 

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I certainly agree with trying another rescue group. Some of those people who run them can be strange. I know by experience. There are many groups out there who are there to help the animal and potential adopter make the best and lasting choice. Don't give up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry took so long long to reply been busy past few days, the reason we were denied was because they weren't sure that we would have enough time to look after the dog. And they moaned about this massive branch that fell of the tree in our garden like 2 days before they came and (has been removed now) to check the house and meet us. TBH I did think of going to other places but I was under the impression shelters and rescues were the same thing and just assumed they would follow similar rules, but you guys all say try the shelters so I will definitely (hate spelling that word lol deffo is a lot more easy x.x) get in contact with a few.
And as for breeds we aren't really to picky there just dogs that we have been looking at we just both know we prefer bigger dogs, but more important to us is the age of the dog, we really need one that is younger more easy to train, and money etc isn't really an issue. Any way guys thanks for the info and links lots of help I'll be on the phone to the shelters tomorrow
 

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I wouldn't get too hung up on age in terms of trainability. When I adopted Martin the terrier at age seven he was far more responsive to training than Bodhi the lab x was at a year and a half. Bodhi was too caught up in being a super energetic lab border collie mix to pay that much attention to anything beyond basic commands until he was three or four. He could do it, it was just clear that he really would rather be doing something else. Martin was still really active but he seemed to be a bit more focused once he got it into his head that listening to me resulted in happy things while ignoring me didn't get him anything.
 

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Just lie on the application. It's not like the shelter police are gonna come check up on you.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lorenzo View Post

Any advice is valued, thanks in advance.
Animal ownership (and breeding) by responsible people is copied by irresponsible people.

To do something which is harmfull if copied by irresponsible people is therefore an irresponsible behaviour itself.

And before a lynch party assembles I think that idea sucks myself.

Unfortunately that an idea sucks has no bearing whatsoever on if, or not, the idea is right.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nomad888 View Post

Just lie on the application. It's not like the shelter police are gonna come check up on you.
Which is exactly the kind of behaviour that is easy for any jerk-off to copy that I was thinking about.
 

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Why did the rescue think you wouldn't have enough time? The branch situation has been cleared up so that's no longer an issue. I'm not sure why the branch would have been an issue unless it seemed dangerous and you didn't plan on removing it.

I would reapply at another shelter/rescue group. I would honestly analyze the time situation (Does it seem like you may not have enough time? If not, why would the group have thought that?) and then I would present a plan to the next rescue group along with potential issues you have thought of and your solutions.

If you work full time, I would advise something like a dog walker to come in mid day to take the dog out to stretch his/ her legs for half an hour- 45 minutes. Doggie daycare 2-3 times a week, and maybe a training course once a week or twice a month after work for you and your dog to do together. If it's a matter of being a busy family with lots of extra curricular activities, I would present a plan to have the dog join in with many of the family activities, or create new activities to do with the dog, like once a week training classes, such as basic obedience to start out, with maybe a plan to participate in some more advanced classes later on or dog sport.

The truth is, working full time, you probably do need a trained adult dog, or if you are just very busy or rarely home, especially one you plan on doing a lot with. Doggie daycare and dog walkers cost A LOT. Back when I was working full time and living with my sister who also worked, I paid about 50 dollars a week for a dog walker to come in 3 times a week for 45 minutes. I still think I should have had more time with my dog, and I feel guilty that she had to spend so much time alone while I was working and pursuing personal endeavors. My sister was supposed to help out with her care more, but she wasn't interested so I found out the hard way the only person you can trust to care for your dog like you want is you.

My spouse works full time now, and I work part time, mostly mornings. We have a ton of time our dog because the fact our shifts are at different times, and I rarely work longer than a 5 hour day, which is the maximum our dog would have to spend alone, and a minimum of three times a week there is always someone home. It's ideal and I'm confident if we were applying to adopt a second dog, we would be able to show that to any rescue group and they would approve the time situation. Try and show a rescue or shelter where you plan on finding the time to care, love and train your future dog. Now, if you try to show the time, and you simply can't find more than the evenings after work(And since you have a child even that isn't free time) then you need to find a way to make more time, or make alternate arrangements for your dog(Like suggested above). To you, a dog is going to be just a part of your life. To your dog, you are going to be their ENTIRE life. Keep that in mind.

Good luck.
 
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