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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 9-year-old cat named Lupin. Lupin isn't neutered because I got him when I was 12 and my parents would never take me to the vet (they never took any of our animal companions to the vet). Now that I can afford to neuter him on my own I am faced with a few dilemmas.<br><br>
Lupin is a mostly-indoor cat. I let him out about one day a week, and he stays out all day. He has had a history of FLUTD and UTI's.<br><br>
I am moving to an apartment on a fairly busy street. I've never moved before, so I don't really know what to do with him once we get there. If he gets out, what are the chances of him finding his way back? Can a cat learn his surroundings that quickly? Should I get him neutered first? Or would the stress of moving PLUS surgery be too risky for a cat with a history of FLUTD? This is assuming I can eventually find a vet to do it...the only vets in my area that I don't owe money to will not neuter a cat over 8 years old.<br><br>
Like I said, I've never moved before, so I don't really know how cats behave in these situations. If anyone could provide some insight or advice, I'd be very thankful!
 

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I'd say he could learn that fast- we had a cat who used to come camping with us, and he always knew where our site was, even in a crowded place. I think neutering him would be a good idea, because in a busy area there are probably stray cats, which would both attract him to wandering and possibly lead to more unwanted strays.<br><br>
I don't know anything about FLUTD, so I can't reckon that side of the argument.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply!<br><br>
I hope my cat is as smart as your's! I think you're right about neutering. I've always worried about my cat causing unwanted kittens, but luckily I know everyone in my (current) town and they know not to let my cat near any unspayed females. But now in a new, much bigger town, I'd feel much safer knowing he can't impregnate any ladies at all.<br><br>
I am wondering if I should let him lead me around on his leash around the yard for a while before letting him out completely. He could spray/leave his mark around the yard and garden, which would probably help him find his way.<br><br>
He was once outside for 22 days straight during the Winter and somehow found his way back. He's a smart cat so I hope he can learn quickly! Like I said, I only want to let him out one day a week anyways so he doesn't become dehydrated.<br><br>
I also found some helpful articles about moving houses with cats. Luckily we have a few extra weeks and we can move at the pace we desire. We can have the new apartment completely set up before we have to bring him over there, so all of the familiar furniture and rugs that he already has marked will be there for him.<br><br>
I am going to ask the neighbors around there if they let their cats outside. It'd be good to know if any of them have ever had their cats hit by cars or lost or anything.<br><br>
If anyone else has any advice or info, please post!<br><br>
So much to contemplate! But I love my little buddy - I want him to be safe. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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You should absolutely get your cat neutered if you're going to let him outside. I'm sure he's been responsible for producing more unwanted litters. You don't know every cat in the area, and stray female cats are probably not going to be hanging out with people. I think it's very irresponsible to let an unneutered cat outside. Is he vaccinated against Leukemia? AIDS? Have you tested him for both on a regular basis? An intact cat has a greatly increased odds of catching either/both disease, as well as passing them on to other cats, fixed or not. Is he microchipped?<br><br>
There should be no reason why a vet wouldn't neuter an older cat. It's literally a five minute operation, and they don't even need general anesthesia. With an older cat, you'd probably want to run some pre-operative testing, but I have a really hard time believing no one would do the surgery. They'll do complex cancer surgeries on 15 year old cats. A routine procedure shouldn't be a big deal.
 

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rabid child speaks truth, it is a very easy procedure and you could have it done with so you know he's not causing unwanted litters, stray or no.<br><br>
If he likes being on a leash, I'd say that's a good way to let him know what's his place. If not, I still wouldn't worry too much- we've always had cats, and we've always just fed them at the house and let them outside most of the time, and they all stay around.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MoarPineapplePlz</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2964666"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I am moving to an apartment on a fairly busy street.</div>
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This concerns me more than Lupin getting used to his surroundings and knowing how to get home. I don't advocate for either indoor/outdoor as I have had both. I do think it depends on where you live.<br>
I also agree neutering is the way to go...good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>rabid_child</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2966481"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You should absolutely get your cat neutered if you're going to let him outside. I'm sure he's been responsible for producing more unwanted litters. You don't know every cat in the area, and stray female cats are probably not going to be hanging out with people. I think it's very irresponsible to let an unneutered cat outside. Is he vaccinated against Leukemia? AIDS? Have you tested him for both on a regular basis? An intact cat has a greatly increased odds of catching either/both disease, as well as passing them on to other cats, fixed or not. Is he microchipped?<br><br>
There should be no reason why a vet wouldn't neuter an older cat. It's literally a five minute operation, and they don't even need general anesthesia. With an older cat, you'd probably want to run some pre-operative testing, but I have a really hard time believing no one would do the surgery. They'll do complex cancer surgeries on 15 year old cats. A routine procedure shouldn't be a big deal.</div>
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My mom and I have been out of work and receiving disability since an accident when I was 18, so I've done as much as I can medically for him. He is up to date on all shots, had all tests, and is microchipped. There are literally 5 houses in a 10 mile radius where I live now, so it is very unlikely he has produced any kittens.<br><br>
None of the low-cost clinics will take him, is what I meant. I can't afford to take him to a regular vet right now as they all charge $150+ and I still owe $1,200 and $400 to two different vets nearby. I've gone without food myself to feed him before on multiple occasions when the vet suckered me into thinking my cat needed that Prescription Diet food so if I have to, I can find him a vet. It's not like I'm lying, however difficult you find my words to believe.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MoarPineapplePlz</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2964666"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I have a 9-year-old cat named Lupin. Lupin isn't neutered because I got him when I was 12 and my parents would never take me to the vet (they never took any of our animal companions to the vet). Now that I can afford to neuter him on my own I am faced with a few dilemmas.<br><br>
Lupin is a mostly-indoor cat. I let him out about one day a week, and he stays out all day. He has had a history of FLUTD and UTI's.<br><br>
I am moving to an apartment on a fairly busy street. I've never moved before, so I don't really know what to do with him once we get there. If he gets out, what are the chances of him finding his way back? Can a cat learn his surroundings that quickly? Should I get him neutered first? Or would the stress of moving PLUS surgery be too risky for a cat with a history of FLUTD? This is assuming I can eventually find a vet to do it...the only vets in my area that I don't owe money to will not neuter a cat over 8 years old.<br><br>
Like I said, I've never moved before, so I don't really know how cats behave in these situations. If anyone could provide some insight or advice, I'd be very thankful!</div>
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You have an un-neutered cat that you let outside all day? Seriously? Get him fixed, now. If you ever plan on letting him out again ever, get him fixed.<br><br>
Also, try to pay those vets you owe. It's a really tough job and they deserve to get paid.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MoarPineapplePlz</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2966864"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
My mom and I have been out of work and receiving disability since an accident when I was 18, so I've done as much as I can medically for him. He is up to date on all shots, had all tests, and is microchipped. There are literally 5 houses in a 10 mile radius where I live now, so it is very unlikely he has produced any kittens.<br><br>
None of the low-cost clinics will take him, is what I meant. I can't afford to take him to a regular vet right now as they all charge $150+ and I still owe $1,200 and $400 to two different vets nearby. I've gone without food myself to feed him before on multiple occasions when the vet suckered me into thinking my cat needed that Prescription Diet food so if I have to, I can find him a vet. It's not like I'm lying, however difficult you find my words to believe.</div>
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Maybe you should give him to someone who can afford to take care of him.
 

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OP: What you don't seem to get is that there are a lot a lot of cats who don't have owners, both in cities and rural areas, and no, it's unlikely you'd actually see them around if they have enough room not to be seen. And a tom wandering around is contributing to the amount of strays added.<br><br>
I'm also agreeing with River, if you don't think you can continue to keep him up, give him to a friend who can afford him.
 

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generally i'd say you should get him neutered asap but i understand the financial strain you're under at the moment and as long as you're providing him with food and needed medical care you're doing ok. but, if you're not going to get him spayed don't let him out anymore. you're moving to a busy street anyway and the danger of him getting injured or killed by traffic will be high. also, if you're moving to a busy street there'll be more cats around that can get pregnant because you're letting an intact male outdoors.<br>
if you don't have the money to have him fixed you don't have the money to let him outside.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>zirpkatze</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2970760"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
generally i'd say you should get him neutered asap but i understand the financial strain you're under at the moment and as long as you're providing him with food and needed medical care you're doing ok. but, if you're not going to get him spayed don't let him out anymore. you're moving to a busy street anyway and the danger of him getting injured or killed by traffic will be high. also, if you're moving to a busy street there'll be more cats around that can get pregnant because you're letting an intact male outdoors.<br>
if you don't have the money to have him fixed you don't have the money to let him outside.</div>
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Agree 100%
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>MoarPineapplePlz</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2966366"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks for the reply!<br><br>
Like I said, I only want to let him out one day a week anyways so he doesn't become dehydrated.<br></div>
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Why does he need to go outside in order to not become dehydrated? Maybe I'm confused about what you're saying, but you should be providing him water in your home.<br><br>
If he's not neutered, he should definitely not be allowed outside at all. Regardless of the number of houses on your street, if he's outside unsupervised all day he could be out impregnating numerous strays in your area, whether you see them or not. There is already a cat overpopulation problem, so please get him neutered ASAP or keep him inside.
 

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I think she meant the opposite- only one day, because if he's out longer he won't have water.<br><br>
And agreed, keep him in until you neuter him
 
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