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Discussion Starter #1
My doggie Maggie has really bad ears so I try to clean them out every couple weeks.<br><br><br><br>
I always feel so bad when I do. She hates the process, but she lets me do it. Then afterwords she runs around in the yard and rubs her ears against the grass and whines. Then she curls up in a corner over a vent and lets the cool air go in her ears.<br><br><br><br>
I mean she is always okay the next morning, but I just always feel so bad after the process.<br><br><br><br>
Pointless Post I know, but I just wanted to get it off my chest.<br><br><br><br>
Anni
 

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Yeah, what do you use? My dog gets a bath every 4-5 months, or as needed. When her bath is done, I clip her nails and use this ear cleaning solution in her ears. It's like a thickish liquid and I squeeze it in her ears, then massage her ears to get it in there, then just wipe the excess on the outside of the ear canal with a towel. Her ears never get bad, though.
 

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We've been cleaning my dogs ears for years, and he hates it too. We have to do it every day right now. Yuuch. We use Oti-Clens.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, the Magster has mites (We got some mite solution for her) and we use 1 part peroxide 4 parts water. We are hoping when we use the mite stuff it will be a little better.
 

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IS she floppy eared? Broken eared? Or stand-up?(i froget the proper names for them sorry). I thought they had a powdered mite ear cleaner. You coudl see if your vet has somethine similar. I thought they would because of floppy -eared dogs. But that's if she jsut hate the feelign of water in her ear. If it isn't and the stuff is stinging her, maybe you coudl see if they have a non-stinging formula(the ear mite stuff might be non-stinging.. i'm not sure)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>stangPlus2Birds</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
What type of dog? Regular ear cleaning is common for Springers. My fur-kid has always hated it. But, it's better than getting an infection.</div>
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She is a sheltie.
 

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Wow, a Collie breed. Chances are she's <b>very smart!</b> Since my fur-kid is a hard-core <b>field</b> Springer, I know what it's like! I *warn* people that are thinking of Springers or Brittneys that they are getting a high-energy and <b>smart</b> fur-kid.<br><br><br><br>
Dealing with a smart fur-kid is <b>VERY different</b> than the "typical garbage" that you hear.<br><br><br><br>
Pjr does the same thing as your doggie. I *try* to make things better by giving her some treat afterwards and going outside for a walk. But, a *smart* dog will *always* have the upper hand.<br><br><br><br>
With Pjr, she has a very sensitive nose. When people talk about dogs "being psychic", it's really <span style="text-decoration:underline;">basic science</span>. Many dogs can smell and see even the slightest change in your mood or feelings. Pjr is a scent/retriever breed.<br><br><br><br>
With your fur-kid, I'm sure that she can pick up on the slightest tonal changes in your voice, the change in your heart rate (perspiration), and the change in your anxiety and mood (again, through sweet and heat).<br><br><br><br>
So, be understanding, and be nice afterwards. Doing the whole "dominance thing", is a misnomer with a field dog that's a fur-kid. Your dog likely has the intelligence of a 3-5 year-old person and the social skills/abilities of a person in their 60's.<br><br><br><br>
IMHO, you could be "very dominate" over the dog, but then you loose the best part of having a fur-kid. I choose to "pick my fights" with Pjr. Cleaning the ears is one of those areas where "we agree to disagree". IMHO, with a <b>smart dog</b> having gray areas is important. That way, when I "get very serious", she knows it's *important* and not just "some other stupid thing that dad wants/likes, but she doesn't like".<br><br><br><br>
So, in summary (yes, finally <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">), it sounds like you're doing the right thing. Let your fur-kid throw her little tantrum afterwards so she can show you how much she hates it. Then, after a while, it's all okay. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Disclaimer: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I have 20+ years experience with pure-bred Springers. As you may have guessed, I'm also a very hard-core AR person. My views are based on my personal views and my experience with (field) Springers.<br><br><br><br><b>[on Soapbox]</b><br><br>
Since this is relevant to my views above and this <span style="text-decoration:underline;">specific topic with this specific dog</span>:<br><br>
I also have a number of graduate semesters in "what defines learning/intelligence". Yea, the "Dog Whisperer" and I disagree on "terms" (submission vs <span style="text-decoration:underline;">learning</span>) and some techniques. Also, his techniques are geared for dogs with <b>Major Massive problems</b>, and he has to give 15-second basic easy answers so that the viewers and dog-guardians get the idea without too much thinking".<br><br><b>[off Soapbox]</b>
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>stangPlus2Birds</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Disclaimer: <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I have 20+ years experience with pure-bred Springers. As you may have guessed, I'm also a very hard-core AR person.</div>
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I wouldn't have guessed that. You don't find too many AR people into pure breeds. Do you work with a Springer rescue group or something?
 

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I have a beagle whose ears I hve to clean regularly - he gets this black, gross waxy build up. He has slight allergies....plus floppy ears , so no ventilation.<br><br><br><br>
I always clean them then put a swimmers ear product in there for dogs. It dries it out and cools it off. He seems to like it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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My doggie hates her ears being cleaned, but she tolerates it.<br><br><br><br>
Her thing is getting her nails trimmed. She HATES it! I think it's the noise. She acts so scared. I always feel so bad <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("> When it's done though she knows she gets some yum-yums, so right after she always jumps up, wags her tail and waits for her yum-yum treats.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kpickell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I wouldn't have guessed that. You don't find too many AR people into pure breeds.</div>
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Sorry if this is semi off-topic...<br><br>
But, it does relate to <b>teaching a fur-kid</b> as compared to "training" a fur-kid.<br><br><br><br>
It's a very involved story why an AR person is so much into a purebred *Springer*.<br><br><br><br>
I'll try the semi-short version:<br><br>
(IMHO, if someone explain in a few words why they're AR or veg*an, maybe they need to give it more thought!)<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Many of my friends and relative hunt. Springers are, IMHO, one of the smartest breeds. Springers, like all "true" retriever-breeds, are <b>non-bite NON-KILL</b> dogs! After Pjr, I've become very pro-springer.<br><br><br><br>
Pjr stands for "Pirate Junior". When it was time for me to get another fur-kid, I was going to go to the shelter and get another "pure bred mutt" like my first dog - Pirate. Pirate got loose a few times, so "it was possible" that a doggie in the shelter was his. Pjr was spayed when she was very young.<br><br><br><br>
I was very good friends with Pjr's doggie dad (Domino) and doggie mom (Ginger). Yea, I was weak. Domino was the greatest Springer/dog I ever knew (up to that point). Ginger was a "classic" super gorgeous Springer. When Pjr and I saw each other, it was *instant* attraction - no questions that we were <span style="text-decoration:underline;">meant for each other!</span> So much for getting a rescue dog back then.<br><br><br><br>
After 12+ years, I can't ever imagine any other fur-kid other than a pure-bred Springer.<br><br><br><br>
Kinda ironic? Huh? A "hunting" dog end up being the *perfect* fur-kid for a hard-core AR person. Springers are SMART, and they <b>non-bite NON-KILL</b> dogs! I have woods behind my house. For 6+ years, I've had one or more rabbits that that like to hang out in my yard. They can easily escape through the picket fence (reason I have a picket fence) and the seem to know that Pjr likes to "play". One will even play "chase me" in the yard with Pjr. I also have a "zillion" squirrels in my yard.<br><br><br><br>
Springers are also great because they are *always* thinking of how to get their way by manipulating mom/dad. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> They are VERY self-aware!<br><br><br><br>
I started out veggie, went vegan, became semi-AR, adopted Pjr, quickly became a very hard-core AR person when I saw just how very smart and self-aware a doggie could be. Over the years, thanks to Pjr, I see more and more intelligence in other dogs and other animals. People often mistake "intelligence" to learning to "repeat" something. But, being self-aware, being aware of others/ their needs/ their feelings, being able to adapt, being able to learn on their own, and so on, are much better indicators of "intelligence" than being able to repeat something.<br><br><br><br>
So... <b>,for me,</b> a pure-bred field retriever-breed is perfect because they are no-bite and NO-KILL. Springers are a better size and, IMHO, more self-aware than the other retriever-breeds.
 

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heh, I think you just need to meet more dogs. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Labrador Retrievers are clearly superior. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p"> (just jesting, I like all dogs, especially mixed-breeds)
 

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To get back on topic, Annie, if you wanted to you could do some acclimation-training... which is the same thing you would do if you wanted to teach a dog to love getting his nails trimmed.<br><br>
Basically started by rewarding the dog for having his ears touched. Ears touched=big treats, good dog. Then after a few repeats, go to Ears lifted=big treats, good dog. Then touching inside the ears=big treats good dog. To eventually Wiping inside the ears quickly=big treats good dog. And then introduce the liquid stuff, one little squirt=super big treats, party time. Then a little squirt followed by a wipe=big treat. Until you get to the point where you can apply the full dose without a problem and have the dog expecting a treat afterwards rather than running off to trying to scratch her ears out.<br><br>
Although if all that's too much, then really there's nothing wrong with just making the dog do it. It's not hurting her, it just feels funny.
 
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