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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So today I finally participated in one of the activist events. We did the FARM Pay Per View on the UofT campus. There weren't too many people since it is not class time and most people are writing exams, so they are less likely to stop.

But it was great. I was afraid to do it first. I expected a lot of people to start arguing or being rude (and i am not a right person to talk to them because i get angry easily), but this wasn't the case. Only one girl took the leaflet i gave her, said "i love my meat" and threw it into grarbage, the rest were very open. Was also great to see their reaction while watching the videos. Two girls watched, they were close to tears after. and they brought about 6 of their friends after to watch it as well! I was talking to them after the videos, giving them information, answering questions. Some were worried that they can't stop eating animal products so i was telling them that we all have a different pace, they should just try a few days a week and learn more about it, we got their email addresses so they would receive vegan recipes.

So all in all a very great experience. I will try to participate in as many as I can. Even though I thought I don't have a personality to be an activist, I think there is a possibility for people with any kind of character to get involved
 

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Congrats, Ira.

I totally thought this thread was going to be about something else, which is why I opened it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
lol, ah come on it is me who made this thread. what other first times can i have
 

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Just one helpful tip - when anyone says "I love meat", I'd politely tell them that's the reason I'm there. Another good reply is "you care about animals though right?"

It's good you're giving advocacy a try. It does get much easier the more times you do it. It's also really helpful to try to do it as part of a group if you can. My best day so far was in April when I was part of a group of five, and had the irreplaceable benefit of being in close proximity to a very intelligent, passionate and capable young man named Jon Camp. If you could possibly find a way to be a part of a group, especially with more experienced people, it really helps you bring out your abilities.

It doesn't have to be any specific group. If you're into the PETA stuff that's fine. I'm sure you'll find a group of people with similar interests in your local area. If you haven't already read this wonderful book co authored by Bruce Friedrich of PETA, it's full of great ideas and conversational tactics. It's made me a better conversationalist, and not just on these issues. I'd recommend it to anyone interested in this line of volunteer work.
 

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Please note that meat contains animal toxins, i always say to people who don't understand how i do to try for one month. I read somewhere that the body needs a little less than one month to fuffly clean itself in normal conditions ( less if you do some special cleanse, like only juices during a week, but whatever ).

So generally if they can stop eating meat during one month, after they don't feel the need for it just because their body is entirely free of animal toxins ( wich a little like a drug for the dependance feeling ).

from my experience it works like 4 times on 10 ( depends on peoples will during the month, if they pass it they always become vegetarian even if it is often a few months later ). I find it more effective than to say to stop just a day or two per week.

Anyway congratulations ^^. You will probably always find some eeeh... "not very nice people", but there will always be much more awesome people for you to meet. And if someone is awful with you remember not to take it personally. Those are people who don't even know you, and don't understand what you are doing. Let it go, don't fight don't take them seriously.

Remember also that even for all those people who don't stop, at least they have seen you with the corner of their eyes, and it will plant a seed in their brain, even as small as "oh there is something like not eeating meat". And who know what this seed can become later.

Most of us have eaten meat or even been awful with vegetarians before becoming ourselves activists.

"there is no saint without a past and no sinner without a future" if you allow me a spiritual sentence ^^.

But beware. If you do a lot of activism, you are likely to change. In the good way ^^
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan cyberpunk View Post

Please note that meat contains animal toxins, i always say to people who don't understand how i do to try for one month. I read somewhere that the body needs a little less than one month to fuffly clean itself in normal conditions ( less if you do some special cleanse, like only juices during a week, but whatever ).
I don't agree with this tactic at all. I see no reason to needlessly complicate the issue or promote half truths. If meat contains "toxins" then so do most of the other foods we eat. If we wish to promote a message about kindness and suffering, we should stay focused on that. The so called health argument might actually backfire, as it can cause people to eat less red meat and increase their intake of chicken and fish, causing more animal death in the long run.

In a recent poll, Americans cared far more about animal cruelty than health issues. Since that's clearly where our target audience's hearts and minds are, we should meet them there instead of from some other odd angle. A nice blog post that rounds up some links and arguments to support this position can be found here.

Ira seems to be the kind of person who cares about reducing suffering. I think if she honestly sticks to that argument and comes back to the foundation when people try to move the conversation in different directions, she'll be sticking true to her heart and win more people over. It's a tried and true tactic. I've seen its effects first hand and they are powerful. It's hard to deny suffering. Even if someone brings up something like canines, or our ancestors, or tradition, you can always say "Would you want to be in this animals' place?" and cut right through all that rhetoric.
 

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i'm not speaking about health part, just about the fact that lot of people have the feeling that they cannot stop eating meat even if they wanted to. And it is because of the animal toxines creating a feeling of dependance. I am just saying that i always tell to people that if they try to stop eating meat for a while, they will see that their body will not feel the need anymore.

Whereas saying to stop just a day or two per week will not leave the time to they bodies to clean, and therefore they will most probably continue to eat meat ( from my experience, fot having tried both approaches )

The reasons why they stop is actually absolutely not my problem, can it be compassion, health, climate change, desertification, world hunger... generally i quickly mention them all, see wich one make them react the most ( or wich flyer or video grab their attention the most ) and concentrate on this reason

But i am here speaking of a way that i found efficient to make them stop eating meat, not about a reason to do so.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post

Just one helpful tip - when anyone says "I love meat", I'd politely tell them that's the reason I'm there. Another good reply is "you care about animals though right?"
My responses vary, but generally I say something like, "Many vegans love the taste of animal products. They just decided they love animals, the planet, and their health more."

And when it's a specific food item like steak or bacon or chicken, I usually say, "OK, so start by eliminating all those animal products you CAN live without." I usually remind them that it's "not all or nothing" and that "we all start somewhere."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post

If we wish to promote a message about kindness and suffering, we should stay focused on that. The so called health argument might actually backfire, as it can cause people to eat less red meat and increase their intake of chicken and fish, causing more animal death in the long run.
I agree that we should stay on point. When we're advocating for compassion we ought to base our discussions on that.

But... when someone is clearly more interested in health than in animal suffering, I think it's OK to discuss the health merits of veganism. And in fact, sometimes that's going to be your only opening. For example, I generally only do tabling at events that target animal lovers but I was recently invited to have a vegan table at a health fair. I accepted. I'm going to promote the health aspect of veganism because that's the only way to reach this group of people.

I do not agree with those who say promoting veg*nism for health reasons has or will backfire. I think those people are misinterpreting the data. While it's true that many health-concious people choose to eat more chickens and fishes and eat fewer cows and pigs, the "health argument" against red meat is not the only reason. Consider, for example, the very reasonable explanation that humans are more easily empathetic towards mammals than towards birds or fishes. It's very likely that this increase in the consumption of chickens, turkeys, and fishes is a temporary effect of an increased compassion towards animals in general that will continue to expand to include birds and sea creatures. I do not think it is reasonable to conclude that "the health argument" has failed and is backfiring. I think that's a myopic, short term interpretation based on too little data and more importantly, too little perspective.
 
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