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it kinda sounds like hes just being territorial and protective and hasnt had much exposure. i would suggest talking to your vet and ask him/her if they can refer you to a trainer.<br><br><br><br>
heres a link about all sorts of dog related issues. theres alot about great pyrenees and LGDs.. but also alot of stuff about dealing with aggression. hope this helps.<br><br><br><br>
<a href="http://www.sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library.htm%5B/URL" target="_blank">http://www.sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library.htm[/URL</a>]
 

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The dog listener would be a good book for you to check out. She explains why agression, and other behaviorial problems stem from the dog not knowing his/her place in the "pack structure" of the house. Then she explains how to assert yourself as the alpha in the household. It wouldn't take lots of extra time on your part just being consistent.
 

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The Dog Listener is a great book that helped me with a lot of things, but aggression is one thing it did not help me with. It's still worth reading, but for the aggression you need a more comprehensive book like "Aggression in Dogs" that has a training program you can follow.<br><br><br><br>
I'm not sure what it is your looking for. You could go online and search for animal behaviorists, but they're not going to be able to cure your dog--more likely they'll train you on a strict program to control your dog, like you said, or they'll evaluate your dog and tell you to euthanize him, which is the unfortunate conclusion of the majority of behaviorists today.<br><br><br><br>
Has your vet run a full blood panel and thyroid test to rule out medical issues? I've read that 70% of dogs with aggression problems have abnormal thyroid levels and medication would help if that's the case.<br><br><br><br>
It doesn't sound like your daughter was being very smart at all, especially if she knew the dog had a propensity to bite strangers. They're lucky all they needed was a band aid! ... The first thing you need to do is take the aggression very seriously and be in control at all times. Use a head collar when you're on walks so that you can control his line of sight and stop him from spotting onto kids and strangers. Keep him in a crate or bedroom when company is over (including your granddaughter) until you're at a point where you're comfortable controlling him and have become adept at reading his signs. Do look into a program for controlling the aggression because for almost all aggressive dogs their only hope is their owners. Reread that thread from 10 months ago. Controlling him does not have to involve a lot more time or work, it just requires a whole lot more diligence, foresight, and management.
 

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I'd confine the baby.<br><br>
It's not fair to make this dog pay for past neglect that has caused behavior issues by being crated up every time anyone is around.<br><br>
I applaud you for trying to find ways to get his aggression in check now. I think it's going to be a little tougher than if you'd done it years ago. I really hope you don't give up on him.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>thebelovedtree</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
The dog listener did help with my parent's dogs agression, but I guess it doesn't work with every dog.</div>
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That's good to know. I could see how her program (for lack of a better word) would help some types of aggression, especially learned aggression and dominance aggression. I have the sequel on my list of books to read.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>whisper</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I ignore him if he comes asking for attention or to play, and only do both when I initiate it.</div>
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Wait, you ignore your dog when he wants attention, unless you initiate it?
 

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The vet couldn't possibly know he's fine just by observing his behavior. They need to run a full panel.<br><br><br><br>
I would suggest getting a crate and acclimating it to him (and soon) if you don't have any rooms he can be separated into. You can cover the front with a blanket when visitor's come over. Eventually you will want to work on re-socializing him to strangers and kids, but not yet and not in your home.<br><br><br><br>
If he's already started growling and lunging at someone, it's really too late for a correction at that point, all you can do is remove him from the trigger like you do. It's very important to walk him daily and watch for the signs that precede the aggression. There will always be very minor signs such as a split-second of fixated eye contact or a stiffening of the body or a slight lowering of the tail. The correction needs to come as soon as the dog fixates, before any actions. A book on body language or a good book on aggression will teach you how to read these signs, as it really is the most important part of the rehabilitation process. The Dog Whisperer demonstrates the same principle on his TV show all the time if you wanted to see it in action.<br><br><br><br>
Aggression to kids a learned behavior, and it can be unlearned. Kids act wild and crazy, to a dog they're seen as unpredictable, untrained monsters. And even worse kids love to rush up and grab onto dogs with exagerated hugs and strong petting. This makes even the best dog uncomfortable and is a big violation of their personal body space (all dogs hate being hugged--though they learn to tolerate it or like it over time). The dog learns that the only way to keep a kid away is to start growling at the kid. Soon enough they lump all kids and even short adults together until just the sight of a kid sends them shivers. Unlearning kid aggression is hard because you have to control the kids just as much as you have to control the dogs. I wouldn't recommend trying until your adept at reading and controlling your dog, and even then you want to use a good muzzle. I hate using muzzles, but I'm not going to take a chance with a dog biting a kid.<br><br><br><br>
I wish you the best of luck Whisper. Rehabilitating an 8-year-old Chow Mix isn't going to be easy. Be prepared to start doing some reading.
 

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I agree with getting a crate for this dog. We have a dog that is like this to some adults (we don't know about kids). We keep her in her crate unless the people are willing to try and interact with her (on a leash at first) and see how she likes them. If she doesn't, then it is back in the crate.<br><br><br><br>
I would never trust her with small children or infants. If our friends bring their kids over she stays in her crate until they leave. There are some chances you just cannot take.
 

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I am a dog trainer, rescuer, etc- dogs are my life- but there is NO reason to risk a child's safety for *any* dog. Keep the dog by all means, but confine her- that's my advice.
 

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Why in the world would you reject your dog's attempts to get affection from you unless you initiate it? That breaks my heart reading that.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>DreaAsha</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why in the world would you reject your dog's attempts to get affection from you unless you initiate it? That breaks my heart reading that.</div>
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Because dogs interpret situations differently from people and have different social codes of conduct, misunderstanding that causes dogs as a whole tons of problems. A dog that understands his/her place in the pack structure is much happier than one that doesn't, and will tend to have less behavorial problems which for many people could cause them to give up the dog.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>DreaAsha</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why in the world would you reject your dog's attempts to get affection from you unless you initiate it? That breaks my heart reading that.</div>
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Dogs are different from humans in their need for affection. A submissive dog that is below the alpha in the pack licks the alpha dogs face (petting) and lets the alpha dog initiate interactions.<br><br><br><br>
In a pack of dogs there is an alpha. You, in your house, should be the alpha. Other dogs in the pack do not do whatever they want whenever they want to with the alpha dog. When you don't allow your dog to initiate things like petting, jumping up on you/furniture, and things of that nature you are asserting yourself as the alpha.<br><br><br><br>
Some dogs do fine without you having to assert yourself but others need a leader or they become the leader and then things get out of hand because they think they are in charge. Being the alpha, to a dog, means that you are the one taking care of them and not them taking care of you.<br><br><br><br>
This can help to resolve territorial biting or fear biting because the dog knows that it is being protected by you, the alpha, and does not need to be afraid or defend you unless you call for it.<br><br><br><br>
This is why you shouldn't pet a dog and use the "oh baby, its okay" high pitched voice when they are getting aggressive or very upset. You are only saying that his behavior is acceptable and encouraging the situation to escalate. With an aggressive dog you have to be the leader and let them know that you are there to take care of them and they don't need to be upset/aggressive.<br><br><br><br>
These things are especially true with aggressive dogs. Although non-aggressive dogs will assert their authority in other ways if you allow them to be the alpha dog. Some of the things they will do aren't as bad as others and don't necessarily need to be corrected.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Alfiedog</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
He probably sees little kids and babies as prey.</div>
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actually because of the described actions I would lean more towards a viewing them as a threat. When stalking prey canines don't act like the above description.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>DreaAsha</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Why in the world would you reject your dog's attempts to get affection from you unless you initiate it? That breaks my heart reading that.</div>
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as someone else mentioned it has to do with pack dynamics. Generally speaking most dogs do not require measures like this, but there are times when things that seem silly (such as allowing a dog on a bed, or couch, etc) are needed to establish pack heirarchy.
 
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