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So you know how they say that the things people are trained to crave are fat, salt, and sugar? My boyfriend is the result of that. Poor eating habits combined with over-indulgent parents have created a monster - my boyfriend.

We just watched Food, Inc, together and he wants to buy a juicer to get more fruits and veggies (really fruits) in his diet. I told him this wouldn't really help because his problem is not that he's not getting enough vitamin c, calcium, etc, but that he's getting TOO MUCH fat, protein, etc. He needs to REPLACE some of what he's eating, not just ADD to it.

He says he doesn't want every single meal of his to be him forcing down vegetables and gagging the entire time. I hate to say it, but this is not an exaggeration. He literally will not eat most fruits or vegetables.

Here's what he basically will eat:
Cereal
Chips/cookies/pastries/junk food
Pasta
Meat (ugh)
Milk (we go through like 4 gallons a week, and I'm vegan)
Bread
Cheese

Fruits he will eat semi-willingly
Bananas

Veggies he will eat willingly
peppers
onions

Veggies he will eat semi-willingly
lettuce
spinach

How can he change his diet when (in his mind) he honestly hates everything good for him and its a terrible torture to eat it?

I'm personally getting really fed up with him and want to tell him to stop being such a god damned vagina and eat something that isn't utter ****. But he's a huge baby. He wants to to better, but doesn't accept that it's all in his mind or that he has control over himself.

Advice GREATLY appreciated.
 

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One thing that might help is to eat lots of stir frys and currys. If you use a sauce of some kind it will make eating vegetables easier. This is a perfect opportunity to introduce tinned tomatoes, fresh tomatoes, chick peas, cauliflower and butternut squash;all perfect substitutes for meat.

Smoothies are great (I get a daily portion of frozen spinach in a smoothie) especially for fruit (bananas, avocados, berries etc.).
 

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does he like spaghetti? you can sneak almost anything into spaghetti sauce. my boyfriend's parents don't eat fruits or veggies, so when they come over for dinner I put three or four puree veggies in the sauce and they've yet to figure it out. it's been almost ten years, too, so I don't think they'll catch on anytime soon


also, I know this is usually a special occasion type thing, but if he likes sweet stuff, you can put brown sugar, honey, cinnamon or orange juice on most veggies while cooking and it'll flavor them slightly. and luckily, a little goes a long way.

and seconding the smoothie thing - I love produce, I always have, but I have tmj, and sometimes it hurts to chew, so smoothies help with that. maybe you could hide some veggies in his smoothies. have him pick out his fruits, and then just add a little bit while he isn't looking or something.
 

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It's very easy to be picky when other people are the ones who expend all the labor and do the shopping and make the meals. Don't let him cop out. At very least, make him have ownership over some of the sides.... he finds the recipe, shops for the ingredients, and makes the dish by himself. The more time and effort he invests, the more likely he will be to appreciate it on some level. That is, if he REALLY is interested in evolving his aesthetics. His tastes won't expand if he doesn't take an interest in developing them.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RabbitLuvr View Post

I have had success in getting my husband to broaden his vegetable horizons a little buy asking him to "just try a little bit" of things. Of course, this will only work if he is willing to try things.

I have found that, while my husband used to hate asparagus, and still mostly avoids it, he does like the Jerk Asparagus I make (from Appetite for Reduction). He hates okra, but will have the okra masala that sometimes shows up on the buffet at the Indian place we like to go to. If you are a good cook, and your BF is willing to at least have a little taste of new things (with no pressure to eat a whole serving), you may find that there are more things he actually likes, or things he likes prepared in different ways than normal.

Sometimes boiled vs. roasted, or the sauce or spices, make all the difference in the world.

I am not a fan at all of "hiding" or "sneaking" fruit and veg in things to get people to eat them.
I am. I'm not going to make two separate meals just because someone wants to come for dinner, and I refuse to make just meat and either potatos or pasta for dinner. that isn't healthy in the slightest. if I hafta hide stuff in your food to make sure you eat healthy once in a blue moon, I'm all for it. it means I don't hafta listen to the *****ing of "there's more stuff you can eat than we can eat" and there's that ever so slight chance that maybe you won't have a heart attack on my watch from the cholesterol you stuff down your gullet every chance you get.

:shrug: I respect other people's opinions, of course, but in a nutshell, that's how I feel about it. because my boyfriend's brothers would never let me live it down if their mother had a stroke or a heart attack while eating fried chicken and potatos on my watch, even though it's what she likes.

edit: obviously I mean the general, and not the specific, you.
 

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The only kind of fruit he likes are bananas? I'm not sure what to say. I can sort of understand not liking vegetables, but fruit tastes good. Sorry I don't really have any advice. I never know what to say to people who tell me they don't like fruit. I almost feel like they're lying. Maybe you could just try to talk him into "forcing" himself to eat more fruit, so he'll develop a taste for it.
 

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Try banana-berry smoothies, with mostly banana so that's the flavour he gets.

Also try stir-fry with pepper and onion, since he already likes them, and add just one or two other things, like carrot/asparagus/pumpkin. Be sure to have it in a flavour of sauce he likes, and cut the things he's not so keen on eating smaller and do more and bigger pieces of what he does like.

Sandwiches with hummus, lettuce and tomato could be easy to get him eating.

Baked potato topped with baked beans or chilli beans, and a tiny bit of cheese if he feels the need for it.

And Rachel's idea of pureed veggies as spaghetti sauce is also awesome.

Be sure to try lots of different ways of cooking things. Soup is another good one. He might hate fresh tomatoes then love tomato soup.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post

It's very easy to be picky when other people are the ones who expend all the labor and do the shopping and make the meals. Don't let him cop out.
Yep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sªmªnthª View Post

He says he doesn't want every single meal of his to be him forcing down vegetables and gagging the entire time. I hate to say it, but this is not an exaggeration. He literally will not eat most fruits or vegetables.
Then veg*nise what he will eat.
 

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I'm going through something similar. I came on this forum to ask for advice.

I've been vegetarian for 9 years. I just started living with the boyfriend (a picky meatatarian) at the beginning of the month. I thought it wouldn't bother me... but it pains me to see him put bacon, sausage and processed lunch meats in the cart (chicken breast? Naaah!)... and then come home and sit on the computer. He comes from a picky family that spoiled him (we made homemade pizza on naan bread and he didn't know how long to leave it in the oven for). It stresses me out to go shopping with him and watch him eat. He's eaten some meals I have made (chilli/veggie tacos), but because of school, a quick meal for me is fake meat and salad (the salad he avoids like the plague). I am scared for his health. He was really skinny when I met him, but now he has a pot belly. Also, my dad just had a heart attack at 50, which isn't helping.

Any advice on how to deal with the stress? Or should I just accept the fact that I should be dating a veggie.
 

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You should buy the La Dolce Vegan cookbook. It isn't one of my favorites but it has a lot of recipes for people who don't like vegan food. Like the BLT casserole. mmmmmm
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mojo View Post

It's very easy to be picky when other people are the ones who expend all the labor and do the shopping and make the meals. Don't let him cop out. At very least, make him have ownership over some of the sides.... he finds the recipe, shops for the ingredients, and makes the dish by himself. The more time and effort he invests, the more likely he will be to appreciate it on some level. That is, if he REALLY is interested in evolving his aesthetics. His tastes won't expand if he doesn't take an interest in developing them.
I agree. I used to be a very picky eater and didn't like most vegetables when I was in high school and college (thus the reason it took me 20 years to finally become a vegetarian!). Having an upbringing where his diet was limited his likes and what he is willing to try is going to be limited because of that. He has to be willing to open his mind and try new things. talk to him about it and get him to see that. Say what's the worst thing that can happen if you try something new? You don't like it and you move on to something else! Get him to try different vegetables in something like spaghetti sauce that was suggested before, although don't sneak it in but actually let him know you're putting them in there. Maybe cut them up in smaller pieces so it doesn't seem as overwhelming. Let him know that the more he tries new and different things the more his tastes and likes will change as well. There are so many healthy things out there and hundreds of ways to prepare them and spice them up into different combinations. If he doesn't give up he'll be happy he listened (and healthier too)!
 

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I had some success getting my extremely picky niece to try something new by introducing her to Thai noodles with peanut sauce. PM me for the recipe if you want. It's delicious. We usually have it with soba noodles and lots of veggies, but the peanut sauce really takes center stage and my niece (who hates veggies) ate it, although to be honest she did pick out the big obvious pieces.
 

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This is going to sound blunt, but you have to make him food and not be lazy because it is going to take some time. I make food for my dad and he was a junk food eating guy. He doesn't eat meat anymore, once a month fish (in sushi or something), and no more milk, sometimes once a week brie cheese with wine or something.
read about the McDougal Diet. Carbs are healthy! tell him not to eat a lot of protein!! biggest misconception everrr!!

make him:
Pasta, grains (millet), lentils, rice, and (cut up some potatoes and bake them and they are delish!! and dip them in olive oil with some cut up garlic!)
sweet potatoes, roasted corn
buckwheat with mushroom sauce.
mushroom sauce with mushrooms, some flour, and make it delish. don't use veggie broth or chicken broth.
popcorn as a snack
make soups with veggies.
make borsch.
make pierogies
Salads: iceberg lettuce with Bragg Liquid Aminos (found in Whole Foods, its a healthy soy sauce, my dad loves it, its so much healthier than salt), tomatoes, cucombers, pepppers and onions in the salad
 

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Sounds like you just need to keep nailing it home that he's eating complete ****. His diet sounds horrible, I say make him realize this, otherwise he'll just keep complaining and eating the stuff that "tastes good". The lovely irony that it's ruining his arteries, tell him that as well.
 
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