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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK - gotta problem. My 5 year old will eat only these foods:<br><br><br><br>
PB&J sandwhiches - I usually use soybutter instead, wheat bread that is the kind that kids like - soft.<br><br><br><br>
hardboiled eggwhites - get 'em from a woman who has 17 chickens that run all over the place. My daughter's best source of protein<br><br><br><br>
Cereals - occassionally, would just as soon eat them without milk. Good news is that she doesn't like sweetened cereals at all.<br><br><br><br>
Brocolli - the only calcium that I can get into her. I try to get her to eat it daily, but am not always successful<br><br><br><br>
deep fried chicken nuggets/strips - she's moving away from these, thank god, we only get them about 1X per week. I also get her to eat the veggie ones about 1X per week.<br><br><br><br>
green beans - canned - dipped in Hidden Valley Ranch dressing (I have tried other, more healthy dressings - no way)<br><br><br><br>
pancakes with honey, also wheat bread with honey.<br><br><br><br>
strawberries - fresh - her favorite fruit<br><br><br><br>
chocolate - plain chocolate bars, Newman-O's, sometimes chocolate cake - the junky kind that kids like.<br><br><br><br>
potato chips - prefers Ruffles - I try to get her to eat the organic ones and no way<br><br><br><br>
pretzels<br><br><br><br>
the occassional grape or piece of apple or bite of banana<br><br><br><br>
white rice - with or without egg drop soup<br><br><br><br>
white pasta with Earth Balance.<br><br><br><br>
Frence fries with kechup.<br><br><br><br>
chocolate milk shakes - doesn't drink them all, but likes to order them.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
This is it. I have tried and tried to get her to eat other foods (and I was the one who would swear that my child would eat all different foods because we do).<br><br><br><br>
The good news is that she doesn't like most chips, hates candy (aside from chocolate), won't eat hambergers, hates fish. Basically hates all meat and dairy aside from what I have listed there. She is also very understanding that eating meat and fish means killing animals, and she doesn't want to do that.<br><br><br><br>
The worry for me is that she is very active (does dance 2x per week, gymnastics 2X week, and swims in our pool for 1-2 hours each day - she'd do more if I would let her) and she's quite thin.<br><br><br><br>
I work very hard on making sure that she eats several egg whites per day, strawberries, brocolli, and pb&j and I limit the junk food. I am pretty sure that she is getting enough of everything but calcium. She won't drink milk or soy milk. Won't eat cheese, doesn't like orange juice.<br><br><br><br>
I do believe that she will end up veg*n. She really hates all meat, except for the deep fried chicken nuggets, and hates all milk and cheese.<br><br><br><br>
Got any calcium ideas? I'm working on getting her to eat tofu, but have been unsuccesful at this point. Because she isn't much of an eater, there is no way to get her to eat or try something that she has decided she doesn't like. She'll simply not eat at all. AND I don't like to get into food battles.<br><br><br><br>
If you have been where I am, please let me know how I can get some decent calcium into this kid....
 

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This is how I did it with my BFs eldest. He would only eat meat, sugar, chocolate and chips. If you gave him anything he didn't like, he screamed and cried and fitted. I told them I could break him in 2 weeks. 1 year later, he will eat almost anything in front of him and will at least try everything a few times before he decides he doesn't like it.<br><br><br><br>
You eat what is in front you of. You don't eat it? You don't get anything else. You're hungry later? Then eat the leftovers from the meal. She will not starve herself. No battles. No fuss. No arguing. Seem completely uninterested that she isn't eating supper. Then, later, she gets supper planked down in front of her again.<br><br><br><br>
Now, with that said, there is nothing wrong with fun looking foods.<br><br><br><br>
If you want, I can give you some fun ideas for her to try.
 

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There are kid's version of viactiv out there. I randomly found this one<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.drugstore.com/qxp58505_333181_sespider/gnc_kids/kidscal_250mg_calcium_chocolate_chews.htm" target="_blank">http://www.drugstore.com/qxp58505_33...late_chews.htm</a><br><br><br><br>
Long-term behavioral changes are crucial, as krista has made it clear. But just in case you worry about her lack of calcium on day to day basis.<br><br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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If she likes PB&J sandwhiches, maybe she will also like almond butter and jelly sandwiches. Almonds are high in calcium; I'm not sure about soy butter.<br><br><br><br>
Brocolli has some calcium. Other greens you could try are kale (red Russian kale has a nice taste), pak choi, yu choi and mustard greens (good luck with that one; they are bitter).<br><br><br><br>
Milk shakes have calcium. You can try to get her to drink calcium-fortified orange juice since it's a good source of calcium.<br><br><br><br>
You could try using some blackstrap molasses in things you make for her; it's loaded with calcium.<br><br><br><br>
If all fails and you can't get her to consume enough calcium from foods you could give her calcium supplements. They have nice tasting chewable ones for kids.<br><br><br><br>
Another thing you can do is keep calcium loss in her body at a minimum. Keep her salt intake at a minimum. Don't give her soda with phosphoric acid (mainly colas). Make sure she doesn't overconsume protein (it doesn't look like she is from the foods you listed).<br><br><br><br>
If she is thin maybe she doesn't consume enough. That also makes calcium and other deficiencies more likely. Her getting a lot of exercise is a good thing because exercise promotes bone health.<br><br><br><br>
I think that Christa's idea has a lot of merrit. Your daughter shouldn't be making you jump through hoops to get her to eat right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advise. We don't eat regular meals in our house...we're all grazers. I have tried the regular meal thing, and it doesn't work for use. Usually, when she is hungry, she eats, and when she isn't she doesn't.<br><br><br><br>
Good news, what she likes to drink is water. None of us like soda and she's not big into juice (too sweet, I think). BUT she is a salt hound. Likes to put it in her hand and lick it. She's been like this since a toddler.<br><br><br><br>
I loath to make food a big issue. I am trying to teach her what she needs in order to grow and be healthy. She knows that eggs have protein and that she needs protein to get strong. She is learning that she must have calcium for her teeth and bones.<br><br><br><br>
I grew up in a family of eating disorders, and I am very against getting into fights about food. With the battles that one already has to have with children in this group, the food one is one that I really don't want to take on. Additionally, my husband is wrapped around her little finger, and will foil any struggles that we are having about this (yes, I had to tell him that choclate cake was NOT acceptable breakfast food this morning, after telling him the same thing yesterday - geeze - so much for me sleeping in). I really want food to be almost a non-issue, which is what it is for her most of the time. I am going to try the almond butter. That sounds like a great suggestion to me, and that's the sort of help that I need.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
I will say this - she is very healthy. Her doctor thinks that her height/weight is fine, so I don't worry too much about the thinness.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for all of the suggestion.
 

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Allow me to say this. You will always have battles over food and she will always be a picky eater until you put your foot down. Simple as that. Food as a non-issue with a 5 year isn't going to happen, unless she gets her own way all the time, dear. Sorry. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br><br><br><br>
Also, making her eat what you put in front of her will not lead her to disordered eating. It will teach her to respect the efforts of those who cook for her and to learn to try new foods and not be scared of them.<br><br><br><br>
With that said, she's your daughter and, of course, this is your choice on how you raise her. You pick your own battles.<br><br><br><br>
You can still incorporate healthy, well-rounded snacks the same way as main meals.<br><br><br><br>
BTW, I'd be careful with the almond butter thing. My experience is that the first time you switch the peanut butter, you had better be prepared for major screaming <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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For the almond butter thing. Try to trick her into eating it so she won't even know it's not peanut butter. Blend in a little bit of almond butter in the pb, then the next day a little more, and a little more, and she won't notice as much as if you would switch right away. Also, you could try getting calcium supplements, crushing them (or making them into a powder) and adding them to all kinds of food. Most of the time if it's not too much you shouldn't taste it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, she does take a suppliment each day anyway, and I was thinking about adding a calcium suppliment. I need to find out how much is actually needed, and then figure out what she is getting.<br><br><br><br>
She never screams about the food that she is served, she just refuses to eat it. "I'm full", is what I get. I'll certainly think about getting into the food thing with her, though.
 

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veganna,<br><br><br><br>
Yeah, I admit I did that on a couple occasions. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
EquiPro,<br><br><br><br>
Jacob used to cry and sob. Then, he did the "I don't want this." Followed by "I'm not hungry." So, you're already on Step 3! This is the easiest one to get past LOL
 

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I agree with kristadb. I must say I <i>do not</i> have children, but the advice krista gave is exactly what my mother, Dr. Phil, and everyones else have said about this. Who is in charge? Is what Dr. Phil would say. Certainly her idea doesn't mean yelling at her telling her to finish everything on her plate. <i>That</i> I could imagine would lead to permanant food issues. My family had very littl food growing up. Dinner was a stressful time for my family bc my family was worried how we would stretch the food for the week. There were no potato chips, no alternatives to what they served. So it would be useless for us as kids to complain and coerce our parents into giving us something different. Basically what I mean is, a kid won't give a hard time if they don't think it will get results.<br><br><br><br>
Of couse, I'll check in when I have kids and the same problem. Feel free to laugh at me in my struggles. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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you should try spirilina smoothie<br><br><br><br><br><br>
blend 1 and 1/2 cups of apple juice<br><br>
1 banana<br><br>
1/2 cup of kiwifruit and 2 tsp of spirilina powder
 

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Thalia,<br><br><br><br>
Remember - YOU ARE BIGGER THEN THEM! LOL<br><br><br><br>
No shouting at all! Shouting makes it a fight of wills. Simply lay the plate in front of them, including 1 food that they like, of course. The child eats that food and pushes the plate away. You take it away. Child comes back 30 minutes later, "I'm hungry." You hand the remainder of the plate back to child. Child cries and says, "I don't want this." You take plate away. Child cries, "But I'm hungry." You give plate back and say, "You have to finish your supper/snack/lunch/breakfast before you can get something else." Then follows tears/screaming/whining/pouting. You ignore it completely and leave the room.<br><br><br><br>
Giving them the attention by fighting and "there, there" will only hurt your cause. Instead, act as though you dont care if they eat it or not. When you're 5, there isn't any reason to protest when no one is paying attention to you and you're hungry.<br><br><br><br>
Families without a lot of food options solve the problem of fussy kids by the simple reality that there is nothing else to eat.<br><br><br><br>
I got J, the "I only eat meat" boy to eat anything put in front of him. Granted, he does have some foods he does not like (pickles, apples, hummus, soy milk), but he will try everything once. He asks what it is and then tries it. He eats tofu, rice, eggs, cheese, potatoes, spinach salad, raw veggies, cooked greens, chinese dumplings, etc etc. Of course, he still has his favorite foods (steak, chips, candy, pop, hamburger meat), but he no longer expects these foods from me (his mother feeds him those things).<br><br><br><br>
All in all, everyone declares his eating a success.<br><br><br><br>
Krista 1<br><br>
little boy who thinks he's all that 0
 

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I don't have kids either (thank god, considering I'm only 14), but it definatly wasn't long ago that I didn't cook for myself. The entire time I was growing up we had maids and cooks, and I always had a nanny, so it was never my parents' issue, but they told the staff from the beginning that they cooked what they cooked, and not to let my brother and I be picky. We never were. My brother and I both learned how to cook for ourselves by cooks that figured out that it got us out of their way, giving us something to do, and made us happier with the food that got made.<br><br><br><br>
Providing, of course, that your daughter doesn't have issues with food already. The "if you don't eat it, you don't eat" motto in my house was the perfect environment for my eating disorder to grow after a terrible gymnastics coach mentioned that I was starting to get bigger (well no sh*t, I was 7) and that would never do if I wanted to do well at competitions. It was way too easy for me to just say I didn't want what was cooked for dinner and go off to my room.<br><br><br><br>
But your daughter just sounds like a normal kid. I would stick with krista's idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There is something about that approach that bothers my gut, Krista. It would rub me the same way if someone did that to me and forced me to eat meat now. I know that 5 year olds are not adults, but I still think that they deserve to have a choice regarding what they put into their bodies. I truly do. That's just my opinion.<br><br><br><br>
I did take a bit of a stand tonight and I made her try tofu, which she said that she didn't like, but she didn't spit it back or gag. When the "taste test" was over, we had talk. I told her that she was going to have to eat more calcium, and that she had a choice; she could eat tofu 2 x per day, she could drink 2 glasses of soy milk per day, or she could eat 2 pieces of cheese each day. She asked to have 2 pieces of cheese and ate them down with a smile. I think that, if I switch to almond butter, which I don't think that she'll mind, and up the brocolli to every day, we will be fine.<br><br><br><br>
I want you to know that I AM a demanding Mom in many ways. I expect her to be polite to adults, to not mess around in her classes, to study and practice the things that she enjoys. I don't allow her to bully or to be mean. I keep very close tabs on these issues, which I think are important in her becoming a decent person. I am a big one for putting her in "time out" and she responds really well to that sort of thing.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the suggestions, and all comments are carefully considered. Being that she loves ballet, and gymnastics, I do worry about eating issues in a few years. I hope that I have helped her to develop respect for her body as we go along.<br><br><br><br>
I am very happy to say that she seems to understand that she must eat protein, fruit, veggies and now calcium in order to be healthy, AND because I require her to eat these things in order to do the things that she loves. I just try to let her choose what it is that she puts in her mouth.<br><br><br><br>
Thanks so much.!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
No, she doesn't like orange juice or V8 - I was thinking that they made some calcium fortified apple juice, but I don't think that it is organic. She really just perfers water to anything else. Good suggestion, though.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by kristadb</i><br><br><b>Thalia,<br><br><br><br>
Remember - YOU ARE BIGGER THEN THEM! LOL<br><br><br><br>
No shouting at all! Shouting makes it a fight of wills. Simply lay the plate in front of them, including 1 food that they like, of course. The child eats that food and pushes the plate away. You take it away. Child comes back 30 minutes later, "I'm hungry." You hand the remainder of the plate back to child. Child cries and says, "I don't want this." You take plate away. Child cries, "But I'm hungry." You give plate back and say, "You have to finish your supper/snack/lunch/breakfast before you can get something else." Then follows tears/screaming/whining/pouting. You ignore it completely and leave the room.<br><br><br><br>
Giving them the attention by fighting and "there, there" will only hurt your cause. Instead, act as though you dont care if they eat it or not. When you're 5, there isn't any reason to protest when no one is paying attention to you and you're hungry.<br><br><br><br>
Families without a lot of food options solve the problem of fussy kids by the simple reality that there is nothing else to eat.<br><br><br><br>
I got J, the "I only eat meat" boy to eat anything put in front of him. Granted, he does have some foods he does not like (pickles, apples, hummus, soy milk), but he will try everything once. He asks what it is and then tries it. He eats tofu, rice, eggs, cheese, potatoes, spinach salad, raw veggies, cooked greens, chinese dumplings, etc etc. Of course, he still has his favorite foods (steak, chips, candy, pop, hamburger meat), but he no longer expects these foods from me (his mother feeds him those things).<br><br><br><br>
All in all, everyone declares his eating a success.<br><br><br><br>
Krista 1<br><br>
little boy who thinks he's all that 0</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Will you be my nanny when my wife and I have kids? You rule.
 

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equipro,<br><br><br><br>
You have the luxury of just having your daughter, so you can be more flexible. However, when you get two or more of them together and all acting the same way, you'd very quickly feel like a minimum wage employee at McDonald's! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Epski,<br><br><br><br>
LOL thanks!<br><br><br><br>
I've found that non-interest works wonders. You don't want to eat this? /shrug Ok then. Nope, not getting you anything else. /shrug Cry if you want. I'll be at <insert location> if you chance your mind.<br><br><br><br>
After both boys throwing temper tantrums all the time w/ their mother (and to a lesser degree their father), everyone was shocked that they stopped throwing them with me after Day 2. I do the choices punishment. I make them choose their own punishment. It's wonderfully cruel. "You get to choose: Do <insert what I want them to do> or <insert punishment form>." They looked in disbelief. The older one started crying and screaming "I don't want to do it!" I said "You have to the count of 3 to decide." 1-2-3. You won't do it? Ok then. Off to <punishment.> LOL I remember the look on his face. He was shocked that I stood up to him.<br><br><br><br>
He was equally shocked when his father started using the technique. Both boys were mad at us for a couple of days, but they got over it. Now, there is no temper tantrums with us (lots still with their mother, but that's not my issue).<br><br><br><br>
Everyone, including my BF, thought my methods and ideas were nuts, but they all use them now LOL<br><br><br><br>
Children can smell fear. I show no fear <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Bloodysunset,<br><br><br><br>
There is a difference between a 5 year old not eating because he's in the throws of a temper tantrum and a 10 year old not eating because some coach says she's getting fat. Ballet and gymnastic coaches frighten me. I'd only let my children in them if I was able to attend every class and watch what was being taught. Too many of those classes prey upon the innocence of those children.
 
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