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no, I understand that, and that's why I don't use it.....I'm not going to be one of "those" honey using vegans....in my mind, I just don't agree with it, but follow the rule anyway.

HOney, vs animal based foods/meat, actually has solid medicinal qualities to it.
 

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sorry to hear. Usually, the local pollens decrease the body's immune response to it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

I don't even use it because I call myself vegan, but frankly, I think it's dumb. If you buy from a reputable beekeeper who doesn't let his hives die out, and is as responsible as all get out, I don't think it should be a big deal......
I pretty much agree, but yes it's obviously not vegan to use honey.

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and BTW, we'll be lucky if there are any bees left in the near future.....this was the first yr in my dad's 36 yrs of beekeeping, that he hasn't been able to harvest honey. The bees are too weak, and didnt' have enough surplus,and hopefully will have enough for the winter. He may have to supplement them during the winter. last winter into spring, he lost 5 out of 6 colonies. Colony colapse disorder is a very real problem. My guess from the GMO crops
That's awful.
 

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Originally Posted by Joe View Post

A friend once gave me a large jar of honey from a local farm. It had honeycombs in it. I had no idea how to separate the actual honey from the honeycombs. I tried to take one of the honeycombs out and drain the honey out of it, but because the honey was so thick, it really did not separate.

So I ended up giving the unused portion in the jar back to my friend.

This may sound dumb, but they honey was just useless to me.

Since then I have picked up "acceptable" substitutes for honey, like agave nectar.
I am not vegan anymore.....but I prefer to use Agave Nectar....I once ate honey out of a honey comb and my throat swelled up something fierce so never again....I do eat cereals and granola with it though but sparingly due to my allergies.

Think, Live and Breathe Peace
 

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Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

unless you buy local honey from a beekeeper like my dad!

you use your knife and spread it on toast or on ice cream as is, with the honeycomb intact....also makes like a good chewing gum with the honey squishing out
Thank you, Photojess. I really appreciate the information, and consider it especially authoritative, coming from the daughter of a beekeeper.


I dunno. It just never occurred to me to eat/consume the honeycomb with the honey in it. I guess it just looked like something I did not want to try to eat/consume. For some reason it reminded me of tree bark in appearance. Maybe I'll try it again someday.

Dumb question: if a local beekeeper wanted to market jars of honey without the honeycombs, how would he/she separate out the honey? Just curious. I'd like to have some idea of how it is done.
 

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Honey is one of the few non-vegan things I still consume (I consider myself a strict vegetarian). I have always been a fan of using honey as a sweetener (especially in my tea) over processed sugar or the man made sugar substitute crap. Since becoming veg*n I now only purchase local made honey, for both health and environmental issues. I remember loving the honey with the comb in it when I was a kid. I would chew on it like gum or those liquid filled wax candies they used to have back in the day. Now i'm hoping the local honey will help with my seasonal allergies as well so that I can get off the allergy meds that have really messed up my system. But, for right now it's either that or be down with chronic sinus infections half of the time.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe View Post

Thank you, Photojess. I really appreciate the information, and consider it especially authoritative, coming from the daughter of a beekeeper.


I dunno. It just never occurred to me to eat/consume the honeycomb with the honey in it. I guess it just looked like something I did not want to try to eat/consume. For some reason it reminded me of tree bark in appearance. Maybe I'll try it again someday.

Dumb question: if a local beekeeper wanted to market jars of honey without the honeycombs, how would he/she separate out the honey? Just curious. I'd like to have some idea of how it is done.
I'm curious of that as well. I never even thought about it until you asked...
 
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