VeggieBoards banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
A friend once gave me a large jar of honey from a local farm. It had honeycombs in it. I had no idea how to separate the actual honey from the honeycombs. I tried to take one of the honeycombs out and drain the honey out of it, but because the honey was so thick, it really did not separate.

So I ended up giving the unused portion in the jar back to my friend.

This may sound dumb, but they honey was just useless to me.

Since then I have picked up "acceptable" substitutes for honey, like agave nectar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,660 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

unless you buy local honey from a beekeeper like my dad!

you use your knife and spread it on toast or on ice cream as is, with the honeycomb intact....also makes like a good chewing gum with the honey squishing out
Thank you, Photojess. I really appreciate the information, and consider it especially authoritative, coming from the daughter of a beekeeper.


I dunno. It just never occurred to me to eat/consume the honeycomb with the honey in it. I guess it just looked like something I did not want to try to eat/consume. For some reason it reminded me of tree bark in appearance. Maybe I'll try it again someday.

Dumb question: if a local beekeeper wanted to market jars of honey without the honeycombs, how would he/she separate out the honey? Just curious. I'd like to have some idea of how it is done.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top