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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We had a small flood in our basement from the air conditioner drain backing up when we were not home. That is now fixed but mold is on our sheetrock from the furnice room to the laundry room. From what my husband said and what I read about it, is that you have to replace the sheetrock altogether and dispose. This really sucks because our basement has been newly remodled and the money spent so far.<br><br><br><br>
So I know there is some precautions to this and the worry of the spores being spread. Anyone dealt with this?<br><br><br><br>
My husband works a million hours a week and I want it taken care of ASAP. UM, he is pretty laid back about it so far, but I am not.<br><br><br><br>
You can smell it and see it and it is spreading fast. Any advice of something that I can do until then? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/worried.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":worried:"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/stupid.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sign:">
 

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well.... I'd say the mould is caused by the water / humidity in the room.<br><br><br><br>
Try to get it dry, perhaps by ventilating the room better (windows open etc)<br><br><br><br>
mould in most cases, only grows if it's moist.<br><br><br><br>
What kind of sheetrock is it? I'd say that some should be good cleanable <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The sheetrock is firewall. Like 5/8 if that makes sense. I do not think you can clean it. ( Not sure, cuz that is why I am asking for an easier way to the solution.) Our air has been off for about 3 weeks and that is when it starting showing up. I think the humidity in our basement is part, but the windows, attic fan has always been on and open. I sometimes leave our basement door open at night cuz we have a big privacy fence.<br><br><br><br>
Heck, I don't know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">
 

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Bleach works sometimes. There is also something you can get at Home Depot..it comes in a gallon jug, white with red lettering...unfortunately I don't know the name of it. But if you can't wash the sheetrock, it might be pointless. I'm planning on trying it in my basement...lots of mold there as well. We have sheetrock up that is painted. I have washed the walls down before so I'm guessing it will be ok to use this stuff. I'm painting upstairs first, though, so I won't be going back to buy it for another week or two.
 

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Wet drywall and insulation has to come out. It will absorb the moisture, and mold loves to grow on it. You need to rip out everything that's visibly water damaged plus a good 6-8 inches above it, bleach the studs, let it all air dry, and put in new drywall. It's very important that you get the humidity in the basement down and have plenty of air circulating in the room while this is going on, to inhibit new mold growth. But you don't want to spread spores through the whole house, so if it's on the main HVAC system, you'll want to do something to block that room off.<br><br><br><br>
Not a mold expert, but handled some mold cases when I was an insurance lawyer. I'll warn you there are "mold remediation" companies out there who will rob you blind, but even the insurance company's people agreed the moldy drywall has to go. Caveat: these are the kind of measures that have to be taken down here in hot, humid, Houston, but I'm not sure how applicable they are to cooler, drier parts of the country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Karen, are you talking about Kilz? Thanks for the tips,Tess. This is going to be so much fun. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:"> Like we need another project. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/inquisitive.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":stinkeye:">
 

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Oof. Sorry you have more loaded onto your plate, goat. Along with all the nice things about owning your own home, you get to deal with this, too. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":hug:">
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>kpickell</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Can't you just kill it with bleach?</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Spraying with bleach is a good idea. This will stop the mold from spreading -- and growing onto the studs where it can become toxic -- but eventually, you will need to get a good gas mask made for blocking mold spore, good goggles, and remove that drywall.
 

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start by getting a dehumidifier. that will help to slow the spread by pulling moisture out of the air- make sure you empty what it collects though once a day or so (depending on how fast you notice the pan filling) so it doesnt overflow and add to the problem, rather than helping it.<br><br><br><br>
this should at least slow the spread of the mould while you are figuring out what to do.
 
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