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Today is Martin Luther King, Jr Day (celebrated) and The Root has an interesting article that caught my eye. Here's some of it:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">In the years since his assassination, I have been troubled by what I consider to be the co-opting of Martin Luther King Jr.'s vision. What has troubled me over the years is how his revolutionary message has been hijacked, compromised and relegated to being that of just a dreamer.<br><br>
People are comfortable with dreamers. Why? Dreamers are safe and in a restful state. Dreamers are docile and easy to manipulate. To cast King in the light of a dreamer allows people to be convinced that substantive change resulting from clear vision and direct action is not necessary.<br><br>
All too often, King "the dreamer" is taken out of the historical context within which he developed. [...]<br><br>
King is a part of the freedom struggles of Harriet Tubman, who, when asked how many slaves she helped to free replied, "I'm not sure, but I would have freed a lot more if they had known they were slaves." He comes out of the legacy of Frederick Douglass, who told us, "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will."<br><br>
Only when you understand this historical context can you fully understand King's 1963 Letter From a Birmingham Jail, in which he wrote, "Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue ... Lamentably, it is an historical fact that privileged groups seldom give up their privileges voluntarily." That sounds a lot like Douglass' "power concedes nothing without a demand."<br><br>
In his Letter, King also wrote, "One may want to ask: 'How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?' The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust ... An unjust law is a code that a numerical or power majority group compels a minority group to obey but does not make binding on itself. This is difference made legal. By the same token, a just law is a code that a majority compels a minority to follow and that it is willing to follow itself. This is sameness made legal." [...]<br><br>
What gets lost in characterizing King as a "dreamer" or defining him by his "dream" is the clear understanding and appreciation of the horrific social, legal and cultural nightmare that African Americans were living through in 1963 when he delivered the famous address.<br><br>
The best way to pay tribute to King and his total sacrifice is to understand what he stood for and what he died for. We must keep him in context. We must wake up from the dream and apply his vision in order to avoid repeating the mistakes of our much too recent past and to make today a better reality.</div>
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I quoted most of it but for the whole thing go here:<br><a href="http://www.theroot.com/print/59428" target="_blank">http://www.theroot.com/print/59428</a>
 

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Great article. Thanks for posting.
 

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yes, very good article. ty
 

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I was 10 years old when MLK was shot and I remember clearly thinking to myself, "Good, he deserved it. He was a troublemaker and he got what he deserved."<br><br>
I remember some family members making a few racists comments over the years, the ones two generations older than me especially. And I remember the evening news in the 60s showing black and white videos of black men, women, and children in the south being water hosed and attacked by dogs and cops with billy clubs. I remember separate water fountains in the town where I grew up and the buses that transported the black maids across the railroad tracks to clean the white family's homes on Saturday mornings. There was one black girl, Gladys Wells, in my Junior high school in 1973 but not a single black male or female in my high school graduating class of 600. When confronted with the Federal Court mandate to integrate the local public schools in the late fifties in the wake of Brown v Board, my home town closed the black high school and combined the junior and high schools into one then, incredibly, did it again in the 1980s after opening a new one (yes they were still in violation of Brown v Board some 30 years after the decision in 1954). This time they did it to avoid busing white students across the same tracks that the maids crossed in the 60s (albeit in the opposite direction) to clean their family's homes.<br><br>
So, yea, nice article. I hope it reminds people that 1968 wasn't that long ago.
 

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It is easy to forget how controversial he was at the time.
 

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<div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/132497/mlk-day-not-about-dreams#post_3188599" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Houndulation</strong> <a href="/t/132497/mlk-day-not-about-dreams#post_3188599"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif"></a><br><br>
And yet he still ate meat.</div>
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And he committed adultery, too.<br><br>
A person does not have to be absolutely perfect in order to merit respect and gratitude for all the good he/she did during his/her lifetime.
 

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You can read the full text ot the "I Have A Dream" speech here:<br><br>
<a href="http://www.nashvillepeacejustice.org/MLK/dream.html" target="_blank">http://www.nashvillepeacejustice.org/MLK/dream.html</a><br><br>
<a href="http://www.nashvillepeacejustice.org/MLK/I-Have-a-Dream.doc" target="_blank">http://www.nashvillepeacejustice.org/MLK/I-Have-a-Dream.doc</a>
 

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<p>I couldn' care less about 'adultery'.</p>
<p>I care about be people torturing animals for the benefits of their palates.</p>
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<p><span>I couldn't care less about any of your marginal human concerns. The biggest moral crime on this planet is being commited against animals</span>. I'm not going to cheer a meat eater because he is your hero.</p>
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