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I've tried soy milk in my tea, but it's disgusting.(I don't sweeten my tea, so maybe that's the reason. I have no problems eating soygurts or tofu)<br><br>
Is there anything I can try in my morning tea besides this? What I like about real milk is that it tames the tanins in the tea. I don't know if I should try something creamy like hemp milk or if I should try rice milk.<br><br>
Are there any tea-drinkers who have managed to find an alternative to mik in their tea?
 

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Soy milk doesn't work for me either. I use almond milk, soy creamer, or coconut milk (the canned kind). The coconut milk is so fatty that i only need a little to make the tea smoother so it doesn't taste coconuty. I haven't tried anything else that's vegan.
 

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So Delicious Creamer!<br><br><a href="http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/products/product.php?p=so_delicious_creamer_original" target="_blank">http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/prod...eamer_original</a>
 

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Even when I was an omni, I never understood why people would ruin a perfectly good cup of tea by pouring stuff into it<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">.<br><br>
I've been told that Silk soy creamer is good, but when I tried it (in coffee) I had been used to drinking it black for so long I didn't like the creamer, so I can't say firsthand. Sure dairy would have been the same.
 

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Almond milk is amazing in tea, and I'd recommend evaporated cane juice instead of sugar.<br>
I put chocolate almond milk in coffee makes a vegan cafe mocha type of thing.
 

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a little squeeze of lemon juice is a good way of reducing the bitterness of the tannins.
 

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You could also attack the problem from a different angle by swithing to a low-tannin tea like rooibos.
 

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I agree with almond milk! Coconut milk tastes nice, but when at least with my brand when you get to the bottom of the carton it tastes grainy.
 

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I stopped putting non-dairy milk in my tea after going vegan, because I was frustrated with the taste. It's the same with coffee. I find all I need is 2 teaspoons of sugar in coffee and 1 teaspoon in tea and it's delicious.
 

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I like soymilk in my tea, but I often have tea without milk. If your tea is too bitter, try steeping at a lower temperature, for less time, or using less leaf if you are using looseleaf.<br><br>
Is the soymilk you are using sweetened? Even plain varieties can be sweetened, so maybe that's what you don't like about it. I used unsweetened and only add sugar rarely.
 

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I used to use soy or almond milk in very strong teas (english breakfast, lapsang souchong, etc) but after I discovered the fine subtleties of whole leaf Taiwanese/Chinese oolongs I've not added anything to my tea. Even blacks like Golden Yunnan I've left plain.<br><br>
And yet, every once in a while I might have a Yerba Mate that I drink with vanilla almond milk and agave nectar. Almond milk is definitely creamier, and the nutty undertones go well with some teas/tisanes.<br><br>
All of that to say, try almond milk. Unless you plan on steaming it for a tea latte. Soy seems best for foam.
 

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If you're feeling really adventurous or want to see some of the world of high-end tea connoisseuring, I highly recommend <a href="http://hojotea.com/indexe.html" target="_blank">Hojotea</a>.<br><br>
Akira Hojo is from Japan, but the store operates out of Malaysia. The site goes into detail about nearly everything in the production of the tea - with pictures. You can see what the plantation looks like, how the tea is processed, even see who the farmers are. For the clay teapots you can see where the clay was sourced, the artist, etc.<br><br>
It's a model that I wish more places would follow. There's something nice about being able to see where your product came from every step of the way.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>RunnerVeggie</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2915267"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If your tea is too bitter, try steeping at a lower temperature, for less time, or using less leaf if you are using looseleaf.</div>
</div>
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Indeed.<br><br>
I've recently discovered the joys of eastern brewing. Small tea-to-water ratios: tiny 200ml teapots stuffed with leaves. And really short brew times: 45-75 seconds (10 seconds for one variety). The benefit here is that you make enough for one 8oz cup at a time, more of the tea's mellow/savory/sweet flavors come out. When you're done you toss in more water, wait a minute, and have another piping cup. This method allows you to control with better precision how much bitterness comes out and to better hold back the tannins.<br><br>
If you're making tea for more than one person, however, then western brewing is still beneficial (large tea pots / long brew times).<br><br>
When I'm alone I prefer eastern brewing, when I'm entertaining people I'll do western (or eastern if the tea demands it), and at work I usually stick to teabags.
 

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I find rice milk works fine for me in tea and OK in coffee - but in tea I really cannot tell it apart from skimmed cow's milk. I could get used to almond milk but at £3.45 a litre carton in the UK I am not going to give myself the chance.
 
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