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<a href="http://breakingnews.ewg.org/meateatersguide/" target="_blank">http://breakingnews.ewg.org/meateatersguide/</a><br><br><a href="http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/greenspace/2011/07/meat-eaters-guide.html" target="_blank">http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/gree...ers-guide.html</a><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Lamb, beef and cheese generate the most greenhouse gases of 20 popular meat, fish, dairy and vegetable proteins, according to a new study from the Environmental Working Group. The Meat Eater's Guide, released by the Washington-based environmental research firm, used a cradle-to-grave life-cycle assessment to determine each food's rank, including the amount of fertilizer used to grow animal feed, as well as data on each food's processing, transportation and disposal.</div>
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This is a great link to share with omni's.<br><br>
Take the quiz, its fun and informative
 

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I saw that linked on FB,and forwarded it to my sister. I'm hoping she'll share it with her husband. Two nights ago, he and I were in a heated argument over that very same information, and he didn't want to believe it. But then he doesn't want to believe anything ANTI-dairy industry so whatever. It was just great timing, and like I told her, whether you want to believe it or not....it's true.
 

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For the sake of good science, it's worth reading George Monbiot's article 'Strong Meat.' Monbiot of the Guardian newspaper has written in support of veganism previously, in relation to greenhouse gases and other issues. Here, he recants to some extent.<br><a href="http://www.monbiot.com/2010/09/07/strong-meat/" target="_blank">http://www.monbiot.com/2010/09/07/strong-meat/</a><br><br>
Not saying this is the last word, or that the people quoted in the links above are wrong, just saying that to argue this issue cogently we need to be vigilant.
 

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I shared the Meat-Eater's Guide to Climate Change and Health on <a href="http://www.vegansoapbox.com/for-meat-eaters/" target="_blank">Vegan Soapbox</a> because it promotes meat-reduction, which I believe is an important first step in helping people become more receptive to the animal rights message of veganism.<br><br>
Then, I read Vegan Outreach's <a href="http://whyveganoutreach.blogspot.com/2011/07/animals-not-arguments-global-warming.html" target="_blank">take</a> and they basically say that promoting meat-reduction for environmental reasons causes people to eat more chickens. Therefor it's not worth doing, they say.<br><br>
I think they may be right that this kind of thing encourages the consumption of chicken, but I also think that it's simply a reflection of the common (natural? normal?) progression most people make from nonveg to veg: they generally stop eating mammals and then they stop eating birds and then sea creatures and finally they stop eating (and wearing and using) the products of animals. At each step when they stop one they may increase their consumption of the others, but in the long run hopefully they end up simply eating (wearing and using) plants, not animals.<br><br>
Personally, I think that kind of transition is common because it's "natural" to expand empathy for other creatures starting with the ones most similar to yourself and ending with the ones least similar.<br><br>
We can be as "vigilant" as possible and be uber careful to recommend veganism as merely <i>one method</i> of slowing climate change, but we ought to remember that simply getting people to stop and think about the consequences of their food choices is an important first step in encouraging empathy for farmed animals.
 

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well, I was mainly interested in the herbicides/pesticides/greenhouse emissions anyway.
 
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