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is the whole calories in calories out thing REALLY that exact a science? i dont worry about it coz i know that going a little over isn't bad. but i always figured that was coz at some stage i was likely to go a little under too. but if i NEVER go under, and go a little over sometimes, does it really all add up? or is it more about habits?<br><br>
i dont know what im tryin to say. its like...argh. no i cant explain <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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and WHY oh WHY on some days, doing the SAME amount of excersise as usual, is your body just that much hungrier? (not in your head but your actual BODY).<br><br>
im not asking annoying questions here, ive eaten way past the quota for today, im just curious is all.
 

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<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calories" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calories</a><br><br><br><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
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A calorie is a unit of measurement for energy. The unit's name is French and derives from the Latin calor (heat). In most fields, it has been replaced by the joule, the SI unit of energy. However, it remains in common use for the amount of energy obtained from food. Many different definitions for the calorie emerged during the 19th and 20th centuries. They fall into two classes:<br><br><br><br>
* The small calorie or gram calorie approximates the energy needed to increase the temperature of 1 g of water by 1 °C. This is about 4.185 J.<br><br>
* The large calorie or kilogram calorie approximates the energy needed to increase the temperature of 1 kg of water by 1 °C. This is about 4.185 kJ, and exactly 1000 small calories.<br><br><br></div>
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simply put, calories are the energy rating of food. If a slice of bread had 80 Calories, it will give you 80 Calories of energy. If you consume more calories then you use, your body stores some for later (fat). If you consume less then you use, your body uses some in the storage.<br><br><br><br>
its more complicated then that, but thats the basics.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks troub! i follow that much (a few years of AN will do that to ya) but what im trying to understand now, is does EVERY extra calorie slowly add up or is it pretty much rough estimation. coz i dont worry about every extra calorie..but more because i assume that ill work it off at some point.<br><br>
but is it more that sometimes it honestly just doesn't matter?<br><br>
im so sorry, for posting these posts. its like i think im in the clear ( i eat so much garbage now<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> ) but then it hits you, wham. so to be honest the weight gain part is something i figure ill avoid. ive been eating plenty, more than most people i know, and not gaining anything. so i figure why gain if i can live healthily like this! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> except that meant deciding i would NOT gain and now its gone all obsessive (but healthier, and eating enough calories. but just...no more than that) all over again. sigh.<br><br>
and some days, like today. i just want more. most of the time, my appetite stops where it should but some days, my body wants more for no reason at all <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br><br>
i swear, theres something wrong in my head. sigh. and i just can't shake it. i just can't.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>taurushead</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
and WHY oh WHY on some days, doing the SAME amount of excersise as usual, is your body just that much hungrier? (not in your head but your actual BODY).<br></div>
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Your body is really only hungry in your head. If you ignore hunger pangs for a few minutes, they go away (then they come back again). Your stomach nerves are telling your brain that there is nothing left in it. Your brain is telling the consious part of your brain to get ready to feed it again, in hopes that you will jump up and run to the fridge and stuff your face. If your brain sees you are not going to do that, it usually stops bugging you till later. Exersise uses up fuel that has been prepared in advance (glycogen) not whatever is in your stomach--so hunger pangs and exersise don't have much to do with each other (of course they do but in other ways). I would think on some days you eat different things-- one day you have a salad, and on another day you have a sandwich. On the salad day you will be hungrier faster than on the sandwich day especially if protien is involved (check the thread on digestion times) veggies are about .5 hours, and protien is 3-4 hours. So you are eating things with different rates of digestion, so you feel hungry at different rates due to the digestion times of your food.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ok. thanks Gita<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Here is a good explaination of glycogen <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2054746&dopt=Abstract" target="_blank">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract</a><br><br>
also the carbs and so on you might eat before exersise are for re-charging your glycogen reserves-- and re-building muscle fiber after exersise-- they are not used directly without going through the whole digestion and storage cycle. (This is really simplified-- it is much more complicated).
 

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If you only eat when your body is physically hungry (this does not mean starving!) and eat roughly the same amount every day, give or take some, include exercise and eat relatively healthily, you should not worry about it. I know I eat sub-standard, many times eat too much, and only occaisionally exercise enough to burn fat, and I am not gaining weight too easily. Don't worry so much!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
im trying not to. i swear. which is why i thought if i debunked all my little opinions then itd be easier.<br><br>
i really am trying though. and it works for a while but then its too easy to get freaked out a few days later. lol
 

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Your body will also adjust its burn rate of calories according to your brain's built in notion of how much fat you should have. Thus those neat equations for how many calories you need don't always work out perfectly.<br><br><br><br>
If you're not gaining or losing weight except intentionally, over a time span of a couple of weeks, you're good. Keep checking in every now and then but otherwise don't worry.<br><br><br><br>
Your metabolism will change as you get older. For most people, that means gaining weight more easily. So it is nice to check up on how your clothes are fitting and such to keep track.
 

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Satiation (feeling satisfied) has to do with a lot of different things - not just calories or fat or volume or fiber or water content, but a combination of those.<br><br><br><br>
Feeling hungry doesn't have as much to do with your "stomach nerves" (what are those?) but a pretty complicated combination of signals.<br><br><br><br>
Also, your hormonal cycles can affect your hunger.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>OregonAmy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br>
Feeling hungry doesn't have as much to do with your "stomach nerves" (what are those?) but a pretty complicated combination of signals.<br></div>
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I was being really elementary-- The information gets to the brain-- I forget how-- so I said stomach nerves-- unfortunately my biology book is in the attic and its too late to get it.
 

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>>Feeling hungry doesn't have as much to do with your "stomach nerves" (what are those?) >><br><br><br><br>
Wouldn't this refer to nerves which sense tension on the stomach which comunicate saiety to the hypothalamus? I mean, yes, this plays a part, but there are, like you said, numerous other inputs, from blood-sugar levels to social cues.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 

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>>If you only eat when your body is physically hungry (this does not mean starving!) and eat roughly the same amount every day, give or take some, include exercise and eat relatively healthily, you should not worry about it.>><br><br><br><br>
This is the best advice here. Your body (including your brain) will regulate hunger so as to maintain the set-point for your weight.<br><br><br><br>
ebola
 
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