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I hope there is not already a thread about this out there, but I was wondering what my fellow vegans do about ingredient lists that say things along the lines of "may contain traces of milk/eggs."<br><br>
I try not to buy processed foods or foods with lots of ingredients, so this is usually not a problem, but today I am trying to eat breakfast at my mom's house. All of her bread contains dairy and I looked at a package of bagels and it said "may contain traces of soy or eggs."<br><br>
Is this usually something that bothers you? Will you eat it if it says it "might contain traces?" Or how about if it says it is prepared on the same table [this is another one I see a lot] as eggs/dairy?<br><br>
:]
 

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No, it doesn't bother me. It means that it's been made in a factory where it may have possibly come into contact with some tiny traces of dairy somewhere. Manufacturers tend to just stick that on there to cover their own asses in case of allergic reactions. I'm not allergic, and it's not increasing demand for the non-veg*n products, so I don't worry about it.
 

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Exactly what AeryFairy said. Also i think buying these products will show the company that there is a market for products that are dairy free etc and will maybe think of expanding this range of products (More for us! yay). This is showing that it's not that hard to serve vegans, setting example for the rest of the world with Baby steps <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I consider it perfectly vegan to eat 'may contain traces of' products, because they don't contribute towards the demand of non vegan products, and you're probally more likley to eat those products if you eat in an omni-resturaunt or an omni-house hold than these products because (I imagine, I haven't dont statistical tests!) the cleaning processes in a factory are likley to be more thorough than your own in your kitchen.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Eat away. I think it's pointless to avoid them, but if you want to that's up to you!
 

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I don't worry about it. That statement only exists because perhaps one molecule of dairy or egg products could get into the food, and that might be enough to cause an allergic reaction. Also, if you start avoiding all foods that print that statement, you'll find yourself with a lot fewer options. For example, a lot of vegan cheeses "may contain traces of dairy."
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>AeryFairy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2832613"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
No, it doesn't bother me. It means that it's been made in a factory where it may have possibly come into contact with some tiny traces of dairy somewhere. Manufacturers tend to just stick that on there to cover their own asses in case of allergic reactions. I'm not allergic, and it's not increasing demand for the non-veg*n products, so I don't worry about it.</div>
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This is what I think, too. I come up to it alot when buying chocolate for baking and such. I make sure I tell people if I'm serving them 'vegan' chocolate chip cookies or something, just in case they have allergies.
 

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This comes up around here from time to time. The "may contain traces of......" is there to for companies to protect themselves against potential culpability should some one with an extremely sensitive allergic condition have a reaction to their product(s).
 

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Nearly everything states this, if we didn't eat foods that had this written on it, we'd have little to eat!
 

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There was a thread about this a time back. But it's fine that you bring it up again. New people and thoughts are always coming up on the board.<br><br>
I too don't worry about the "may contain traces of" It really is the company just covering themselves in the case of people with severe allergic reactions to certain foods. I take it as meaning they may process a cereal with nuts, dairy etc on the same equipment as the nut, dairy free varieties. But they do clean the machinery in-between the varieties. I've also seen disclaimers something like: "we maintain good cleaning practices in our plant but may contain traces of......<br><br>
I know there are also companies that are "dedicated" nut and/or gluten free. Maybe one company. I don't know. But I've seen it.
 

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I also don't worry about it, as I am not allergic and I know the company is just trying to cover themselves in the case of allergies.
 

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Its only there because if someone eats it and has an allergic reaction they could sue the company for not properly labeling the package, its a CYA move<br>
"May contain" = "prepared in a factory that also processes"
 

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I'd rather have it be 100% vegan, but I'll eat it if it says that. I agree with what everybody else has said, it's part of food laws and stuff.<br>
Oh, but I wouldn't eat it if it said may contain traces of fish, poultry or other meat, (thats happened once before, in candy! Who'd of known)
 

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I don't give a **** about that, as it doesn't mean that animal products were used in manufacturing the product with that label.<br><br>
However, once I saw a "May contain traces of lovemaking" label on a jar of pineapple slices and "This product has been manufactured in a factory where a hippie orgy took place" and went "eww" and threw that in the trash.
 

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Thank goodness for these sensible responses - it is something I have come across ( I am trying to be Vegan for Lent) and came to the same conclusion, although it was a bit disconcerting when I first saw it. Still shocked at how many products actually do contain milk and eggs though - really makes you think about the size of the dairy industry and how much is at stake if enough people stop being a part of it.
 

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Just chucking this out here; sometimes I DO abstain from munching on stuff with 'may contain traces of...'<br><br>
In the case of companies where <i>everything else</i> that they manufacture is clearly labelled vegan, I don't eat anything that they haven't labelled as such, like the Co-Op's chocolate. Some of the bars are labelled vegan, whereas some don't have listed animal ingredients, but stilll, it's the sort of thing that bugs me. I suppose I'm just being picky, but it stops me constantly snacking on chocolate which isn't a negative thing XD
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sevenseas</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2835299"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't give a **** about that, as it doesn't mean that animal products were used in manufacturing the product with that label.<br><br>
However, once I saw a "May contain traces of lovemaking" label on a jar of pineapple slices and "This product has been manufactured in a factory where a hippie orgy took place" and went "eww" and threw that in the trash.</div>
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Dude I would've kept that can forever, thats hilarious <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:">
 

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I was wondering about this myself. I love Frys Mint Cream chocolate bars and found out they were vegan. Checked the packaging and it said 'may contain milk' and I was sad <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("><br>
So I dont feel too bad after reading this that I still nom them! hehe.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Sevenseas</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2835299"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I don't give a **** about that, as it doesn't mean that animal products were used in manufacturing the product with that label.<br><br>
However, once I saw a "May contain traces of lovemaking" label on a jar of pineapple slices and "This product has been manufactured in a factory where a hippie orgy took place" and went "eww" and threw that in the trash.</div>
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You threw a JAR in the TRASH???<br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/veganpolice.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":notvegan:"> Recycle Police <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/veganpolice.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":notvegan:">
 

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It depends on your personal definition of Vegan.<br><br>
I like <a href="http://www.veganoutreach.org/howvegan.html" target="_blank">this article.</a><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Knowing this, the issue for thoughtful, compassionate people isnt, "Is this vegan?" Rather, the important question is: "Which choice leads to less suffering?" Our guide shouldnt be an endless list of ingredients, but rather doing our absolute best to stop cruelty to animals. Veganism is important, not as an end in itself, but as a powerful tool for opposing the horrors of factory farms and industrial slaughterhouses.<br>
This moves the discussion away from finding a definition or avoiding a certain product, and into the realm of effective advocacy. In other words, the focus isnt so much our personal beliefs or specific choices, but rather the animals and their suffering.<br>
If we believe that being vegan is important, being the most effective advocate for the animals must be seen as even more important! The impact of our individual veganism several hundred animals over the course of a lifetime pales in comparison to what we have the potential to accomplish with our example. For every person inspired to change their habits, the impact we have on the world multiplies!<br>
Conversely, for every person we convince that veganism is overly demanding by obsessing with an ever-increasing list of ingredients, we do worse than nothing: we turn someone away who could have made a real difference for animals if they hadnt met us! Currently the vast majority of people in our society have no problem eating the actual leg of a chicken. It is not surprising that many people dismiss vegans as unreasonable and irrational when our example includes interrogating waiters, not eating veggie burgers cooked on the same grill with meat, not taking photographs or using medicines, etc.<br>
Instead of spending our limited time and resources worrying about the margins (cane sugar, film, medicine, etc.), our focus should be on increasing our impact every day. Helping just one person change leads to hundreds fewer animals suffering in factory farms. By choosing to promote compassionate eating, every person we meet is a potential major victory.</div>
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I'm sorry but I think that article is BS, true there is no way to be 100% vegan but its a "baby steps" process and 1 by 1 we are making a difference. Animal products are inco-operated into most products that we eat/use. However what we (and by which I mean all veg*ns) are doing does help because everything we purchase casts a vote as to what consumers want.
 
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