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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That's "mashed potatoes" for those unfamiliar with anyone under 5


I'm looking for a good recipe! Vegeterian, not necessarily vegan. No eggs! (who puts eggs in mashtapatas anyways?) Simplicity helps, but I'm not just trying to smash up some spuds.

Anyone?
 

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i just smash my taters with a little soy milk and marg, and salt and pepper. sometimes i toss a little nutritional yeast and ground almonds in there, too. oh, and boil up a clove or two of garlic with them, so be smashed in there as well. yummy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay this'll sound awful goofy - but let's talk technique. Should I buy a special tool for the job? And do yellow potatoes make for better mashing than red???

So much to learn...
 

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I like to use a potato masher like this . It depends on how smooth you like your potatoes because that one leaves them a little lumpy instead of completely smooth.

As to what type, a lot of people like Yukon Gold for mashed potatoes.
 

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if you use the red potatos don't peel them...just wash really well. Also i know it's not vegan but whole milk and real butter work wonders.....that's what i used to use. if you don't want lumps use a masher and then a hand mixer and whip them
 

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I like to add a bit of oat milk (I prefer it to soya) and margerine, and some sliced spring onions as well as the usual salt and pepper. If I want it extra interesting, I put in some finely chopped sundried tomatoes, too.

I'm not really fussed about whether I use a masher or just a fork, it depends what's around.

It can be good to use normal baking potaoes and leave the skin on - my local pub does this and they call it 'rustic' mash.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by sandiemac

if you use the red potatos don't peel them...just wash really well. Also i know it's not vegan but whole milk and real butter work wonders.....that's what i used to use. if you don't want lumps use a masher and then a hand mixer and whip them
i use a hand-masher. if you use an electric hand mixer be careful not to blend them too much. i think it's excites all the gluten or something in them and they end up "gummy".
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, I'm of to Bloodbath & Beyond (c.f. Simpsons episode 5F01) for a Mashtapatas tool and then to Acme for some 'taters!!!
 

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Mashed potatoes are really good with some kale and garlic too. Cook up some garlic in a pan with some olive oil, toss in the kale and cook for a few minutes. Add this to the potatoes, mmmmm.

I personally prefer mine with the skins on, soymilk, soybean margarine, s+p, garlic and nutritional yeast. I add the kale if I have it on hand.

My son calls them potabos
 

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MMMMM...mashies (mashtapatas)! I use any kind of tater I have on hand. It doesn't matter if I have reds, yukons, russets, bakers or some ????-name in my pantry, I'll use it. I don't care. I think they're best with skins on and a tad lumpy. That creamy [email protected] just doesn't make it with me (it just seems fake, IMO). I use veg broth and garlic with a little lemon pepper. Maybe some ceyanne if I want some spice happening. Sometimes, I boil the garlic with the potatoes (unskin the garlic, tho) and mash everything after draining or if I want a real "garlic-y" flavor, I'll just mince it up and toss it in while mashing. If you're into roasted garlic, roast some up and toss in. YUMMERS!


For tools, I use the masher that saborm showed in the picture. Yes, it leaves your mashies a bit lumpy, but I like it lumpy so it works. Hand mashing is the best IMO. Keeps the glutens from getting all worked up and turning your mashers into paste (unless that's what you're going for in your recipe...). I also would avoid doing this in a processor because then they really turn into glue! ICK!!!!

Happy mashing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm back from the sto' and boiling some Dole Idaho red russets right now (they were on sale). Gonna hand mash 'em and mix in some margerine, onion, and a little bit of garlic and olive oil and gnosh down with some steamed zuchinni and peppers!
 

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Especially if you used red-skinned potatoes, peel them. Why? Irritating tannic acid is what makes them red.

Get a similar masher to the one saborm describes, but with a flat mashing surface, rather than wire. Get stainless steel. Plated steel will rust in no time.

Use all-purpose Long Island Potatoes. These generally have better taste and texture than Maine potatos or Idaho potatoes California potatoes are ok. Don't use russets. Yukon Gold does not taste as good as plain LI ptoatoes, which have a slight yellow tinge -- it's carotene and good for you. The rush to avoid yellow is weird. Same thing about the rush to avoid sugar. Yes, refrigerating your topaters will cause the starch to turn to sugar -- this is a damn good thing -- natural sweetener.

Make almond milk in a blender. To one cup of blanched whole almonds, add 1 cup or more of water (just enough water to be able to keep things moving in the blender). You need about 1 cup of almonds or the blending job won't work well, the blades won't be covered sufficiently. Takes 3 minutes to completely blend the almonds. You'll have more almond milk than you need tho.

Peel potatoes with a peeler rather than a paring knife -- makes thin peel and less waste. If you miss a spot of peel, don't worry about it. But remove all eyes, all bits of hard peel that invade the potatoe well below the surface.

Slice potatoes 1/4 inch thick. Put about 1/2 inch of water in the bottom of a pot a steam about 3 medium potatoes for about 10 minutes. They will be quite soft -- break easily if you just touch the slices with a fork. Slicing before cooking takes only about 2 minutes, reduces cooking time and saves energy -- whatever energy you are using to cook with.

Arrange so that when the cooking is finished there will be very little water left in the pot. If necessary continue cooking another minute until there is just about no visible water, or drain the potatoes and boil the water down separately (to avoid over-cooking the tapatas) until you have just a couple of tablespoons of starchy water. Add it back to the cooked topater slices.

Lots of micronutrient and flavors are in the water. It makes no sense to discard it.

Mash a bit. Add about 3 tablespoons of untoasted virgin sesame oil (Loriva). You can also use regular or extra-virgin olive oil. Continue mashing. Add several tablespoons of almond milk. About 9 or more (3 or more per topata) This will make the potatoes "peak" and be "fluffier." Be like what are sometimes described as "whipped" potatoes. Do not heat the almond milk over 180 degrees farenheit, if you want to heat it first, to have hotter potatoes when the mashing is done. Tho I prefer mine room temp. Same if you heat the mashed with almond-milk mixture -- not over 180 degrees. Otherwise the texture of the almond milk gets sort of gummy or something instead of remaining creamy.

Add salt.

I like to add a dash of tobasco sauce, and sometinmes I stir in some cooked sweet corn kernals, other times some cooked edamame beans - or both.

Parsely works well, as does cilantro (but not both at once). You can add a little to the cooking topaters and mash them right in. They won't mash, but won't interfere too much with the potatos getting mashed.

Adjust the amount of oils and almond milk to taste of course.
 

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how i use to make mine. I think how you cook the potatoes is very important. I use to have a rice cooker and would use that to steam the potatoes. They would be cut up into strips about 1/2" by 1/2" and the length of the potato. Of course no need to be completely accurate just slice em, but don't dice em. Put them in the steamer, when soft, use the left over steaming water as the liquid instead of using a milk type liquid. I would hand mash. Lots of butterish substance is good. Salt and pepper to taste.
 

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Or

http://www.jeelee.com/potatomasher1.html

This type reaches down into a deep pot without you having to put your hand down into the pot, and gets right up to the edge of the pot easily.

I find this flat things with holes in them work much much better than the wire. They work much faster and better. Wire just cuts thru the tater; you need something flat to "mash" it.

Also the circular shape of the mashing disk makes it possible to mash right up to the side of the pot. You don't to put down your masher, get out a spoon and move the pieces from the side, into the center of the pot, and then put down the spoon and get out your masher again, like you would have to do with the wire masher saborm linked to.
 
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