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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read a recipe for cider doughnuts today, and they look great. The recipe calls for 2 eggs. Would standard egg replacer (the kind I have is, like, baking powder and potato starch and stuff) be okay, or will the doughnuts totally fall apart while frying. Flaxseed, maybe? Help me out here.
 

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What does the rest of the recipe look like and how many doughnuts does it make with two eggs? You might have to play with it a little bit to get something perfect, but seeing the recipe might help you get better ideas on where to start...
 

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I've discovered usually a blend of two egg "replacers" works best in almost any recipe... sorta like extra insurance to make sure it turns out.

I'd probably try energee egg replacer (equiv to 2 eggs) AND a heaping Tb. of flax seed meal blended into a mayonaise-texture-like "goo" with a Tb. or so of soymilk...

Good luck - sounds YUMMY!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the great ideas! I got the recipe from this week's Washington Post food chat. I'll sub Earth Balance and sour soymilk for the dairy:

Apple Cider Doughnuts

Makes 18 doughnuts and doughnut holes

These apple cider doughnuts -- dense, richly spiced and with a faint taste of buttermilk -- are adapted from a recipe by pastry chef Lauren Dawson from Hearth restaurant in New York City's East Village. Hearth serves the doughnuts with applesauce and whipped cream.

For the doughnuts:

1 cup apple cider

3 1/2 cups flour, plus additional for the work surface

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup sugar

2 eggs

1/2 cup buttermilk (low-fat or nonfat work fine)

Vegetable oil for frying

For the glaze:

1 cup confectioners' sugar

2 tablespoons apple cider

For the doughnuts: In a saucepan over medium or medium-low heat, gently reduce the apple cider to about 1/4 cup, 20 to 30 minutes. Set aside to cool.

Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and soda, cinnamon, salt and nutmeg. Set aside.

Using an electric mixer on medium speed (with the paddle attachment, if using a standing mixer) beat the butter and granulated sugar until the mixture is smooth. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, and continue to beat until the eggs are completely incorporated. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl occasionally. Reduce the speed to low and gradually add the reduced apple cider and the buttermilk, mixing just until combined. Add the flour mixture and continue to mix just until the dough comes together.

Line 2 baking sheets with parchment or wax paper and sprinkle them generously with flour. Turn the dough onto 1 of the sheets and sprinkle the top with flour. Flatten the dough with your hands until it is about 1/2 inch thick. Use more flour if the dough is still wet. Transfer the dough to the freezer until it is slightly hardened, about 20 minutes. Pull the dough out of the freezer. Using a 3-inch doughnut cutter, cut out doughnut shapes. Place the cut doughnuts and doughnut holes onto the second sheet pan. Refrigerate the doughnuts for 20 to 30 minutes. (You may re-roll the scraps of dough, refrigerate them briefly and cut additional doughnuts from the dough.)

Add enough oil to a deep-sided pan to measure a depth of about 3 inches. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of the pan and heat over medium heat until the oil reaches 350 degrees. Have ready a plate lined with several thicknesses of paper towels.

For the glaze: While the cut doughnut shapes are in the refrigerator, make the glaze by whisking together the confectioners' sugar and the cider until the mixture is smooth. Set aside.

To fry and assemble: Carefully add a few doughnuts to the oil, being careful not to crowd the pan, and fry until golden brown, about 60 seconds. Turn the doughnuts over and fry until the other side is golden, 30 to 60 seconds. Drain on paper towels after the doughnuts are fried. Dip the top of the warm doughnuts into the glaze and serve immediately.

Per doughnut: 201 calories, 3 gm protein, 33 gm carbohydrates, 6 gm fat, 31 mg cholesterol, 2 gm saturated fat, 200 mg sodium, 1 gm dietary fiber
 

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I've never made baking powder doughnuts, just yeast doughnuts, but for yeast doughnuts I just make a rich, sweet bread dough, form it into doughnut shapes, fry it and coat it in cinnamon and sugar -- no eggs required.
 

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This recipe sounds good! I'm just curious what you would use in place of buttermilk? Just some soymilk? And i wonder if you can bake them rather than fry?

For me i use soymilk yoghurt with energy egg replacer. 2 tablespoons of yoghurt with 1 1/2 teaspoons of energy. Makes it a thick gooey consistency like egg.
 

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Hey medesha did these come out good for you? I made them and tried to fry it and it completely fell apart in the oil! I ended up just baking the whole batch. They were yummy but when baked came out more liek cake cookies than a donuty texture. Lol

And i accidently left the good cider out and it fermented a bit.. it has a beery taste to it now! LOL i wonder if it's still good.
 
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