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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize in advance because I am sure some/all of these questions have been asked before. I went through a few pages of the threads on this forum, and found it difficult to assimilate the responses I was looking for. So I figure why not just ask on a new thread. If it is so repetitive, could someone just email me the answers and this thread can get blasted.<br><br><br><br>
My questions are...<br><br><br><br>
1. What would be the #1 book you recommend to read first about moving towards a raw food diet? I was considering the David Wolfe book, but figure I'll get some external thoughts first.<br><br><br><br>
2. Outside of what the book will tell me, what are the things based on your experience I should know about in regards to nutrition on a raw foods diet vs a vegan or vegetarian diet (if any).<br><br><br><br>
3. As a whole, is it more difficult to prepare meals on a raw diet? How much more difficult/easy based on your experience?<br><br><br><br>
4. I have a blender, food processor, coffee/spice grinder and a cheapy dehydrator (circular design, electric heat element at bottom, 6 or so vented racks that sit on top of the base). I do not have a juicer. Anything else I need? How important is the juicer and the dehydrator?<br><br><br><br>
5. I do not see a lot of grains mentioned when I hear about raw food recipes. Am I just missing these? In general, do raw foodists get a proper amount of grains, or do raw foodists believe (correctly or incorrectly) that they do not need the recommended amount of grains?<br><br><br><br>
6. What is the best thing and the worst thing about being a raw foodist?<br><br><br><br>
Sorry about that last one. I have other questions, but they seem more superficial than these six. I just want a solid intro into this whole thing. Everywhere I turn it's raw this and raw that. Either it is extremely popular right now, or I just tend to look for things associated with this. I want to know more about this now because of this.<br><br><br><br>
ETA - OK, forgot to ask one question...<br><br><br><br>
7. How difficult is it to try and do raw based on a mostly "natural" set of foods. This may sound weird, but I hear about making things like crackers on a dehydrator and such. I am almost equating this to something along the lines of Tofu or something, where you really have to go through great lengths and process things to make a food product. I am wondering how difficult it is to avoid doing these things, or if I am exaggerating the "weirdness" of it.
 

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I'll try to answer as many of your questions as I can based on my experience with Raw food.<br><br><br><br><b>1. What would be the #1 book you recommend to read first about moving towards a raw food diet? I was considering the David Wolfe book, but figure I'll get some external thoughts first.</b><br><br><br><br>
Which book? Natures First Law? The only David Wolfe book I have read is "Eating For Beauty" which is specifically about which raw food are good for skin,hair etc. I haven't read David Wolfes book "Natures First Law" but lots of people say it is a great resource for learning about raw food. It supposedly explains why cooked food is bad for you (I think the phrase 'cooked food is poison' is used alot so if that phrase doesn't sit with you maybe try a different book). David is considered one of the "experts" on raw food. I think one of his books would be a good start. Have you checked out his site? <a href="http://www.rawfood.com" target="_blank">www.rawfood.com</a> Lots of books on there. My first general book about raw that I read was Raw Life by Paul Nison. It was OK but it was a bit preachy about religion towards the end of the book which turned me off.<br><br><br><br><b>2. Outside of what the book will tell me, what are the things based on your experience I should know about in regards to nutrition on a raw foods diet vs a vegan or vegetarian diet (if any).</b><br><br><br><br>
I am not sure about this question. I would say if you are going towards a more raw diet - do it gradually. Raw speeds up detoxification of the body so you might feel some symptoms. As far as nutrition, just try to keep a good variety of raw food (like don't just eat all one fruit) and try different combos. For fats, try to eat some avocadoes and get some good oils like olive in your dishes. Getting the nutrition thing down is sort of a process. Eat what makes you feel good. One thing about raw food that Alissa Cohen (she is a good read too) points out that alot of people feel hungry when they go raw because they don't eat enough at first. Make sure you eat until you are full. It might take more food to fill you up raw than if you eat cooked.<br><br><br><br><b>3. As a whole, is it more difficult to prepare meals on a raw diet? How much more difficult/easy based on your experience?</b><br><br><br><br>
Yes and no. It depends on what you are making. If you are doing a smoothie, all you gotta do is pop the fruit in your blender and than drink. If you are making sprouted raw bread, that can take some time. A few days to sprout your seeds of choice, make your batter and a day or more to dehydrate. Making big salad are pretty simple. Just cut up everything and eat. Of course, eating fruits and veggies raw are pretty simple obviously. 'Gourmet' raw is what can take some time. For me, I like to experiment with new stuff so I have variety when I eat raw. So, I love to sprout and dehydrate and make new recipes. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br><b>4. I have a blender, food processor, coffee/spice grinder and a cheapy dehydrator (circular design, electric heat element at bottom, 6 or so vented racks that sit on top of the base). I do not have a juicer. Anything else I need? How important is the juicer and the dehydrator?</b><br><br><br><br>
You do not need a juicer to have a good raw diet. If you are big juice lover, you might want one. But you don't <i>need</i> it. If you ever want to juice veggies or grasses, you will need a special juicer (and more expensive one) like a Green Star. (If you think you might ever want to do that - Green Star will juice ANYTHING - you can even run nuts thorough it). There are some recipes that might call for pulp left over from juicing veggies or fruit. You will need a juicer to get that pulp. But there are plenty of other things to make so you can skip those recipes if you don't have the right juicer to create the pulp.<br><br><br><br>
The rest of your stuff sounds good except your dehydrator. The type of dehydrator you have will only do fruit, veggie and meat. If you want to do raw breads or crackers, you will need a better dehydrator. You will need one with trays and sheets to hold batter so it doesn't drip - the circular one won't hold batter. The Excalibur is a good raw dehydrator has trays that you can do crackers, breads and other things in. It is a good starter dehydrator. You can get a six tray one for a little over a hundred. So, it really depends on how creative you are going to get with your recipes. Are you wanting to have raw crackers? You will need a different dehydrator than the one you have. (you can buy raw crackers and bread already made on the web!). But - like with the juicer - dehydrated food isn't a necessity in a raw diet but you can make a lot things in one which will add more variety to your diet, if that is what you are craving, and can keep you from getting 'bored' on the raw diet. It really depends on what you want to do. I love dehydrating. I like raw crackers and breads. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br><b>5. I do not see a lot of grains mentioned when I hear about raw food recipes. Am I just missing these? In general, do raw foodists get a proper amount of grains, or do raw foodists believe (correctly or incorrectly) that they do not need the recommended amount of grains?</b><br><br><br><br>
If raw foodists eat grains or seeds, they sprout them and than eat the sprouts or make raw crackers and breads out of them. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> I sprout lots of different grains and seeds and make raw crackers and flat breads. There are raw foodists who probably rarely eat grains. I don't believe that grains are an absolute staple in a raw diet. Alot of raw foodies think that sprouts are though so you can get your grains by eating the sprouts. Grains have some good nutritional content depends on the grain. Some people avoid wheat and other hybridized grains. Seeds like sunflower etc and probably eaten raw by more raw foodists as are nuts. You will see those in more recipes than grains I think. I don't think there is an recommend amount or anything for raw foods. I haven't read about it anywhere. I don't think raw foodists follow those "Recommended Daily Allowances" that are set up. They eat what makes them feel good and what works for them.<br><br><br><br><br><br><b>6. What is the best thing and the worst thing about being a raw foodist?</b><br><br><br><br>
For me, I am attracted to it because I like the concept of eating as close to nature as possible. I agree with the concept LIVE FOODS = LIVE BODIES; DEAD FOOD = DEAD BODIES. I like the idea of healing yourself with a diet. Raw foodists pretty much never get sick. You don't feel sluggish after you eat a raw meal. I also like that raw food has opened me up to eating so many different food that I never new existed. I never realize there were so many different kinds of fruit. I mean, unless you live in Thailand or been there, you probably would not even be finding out about Durian unless you were into raw food. Exotic fruits are popular with raw foodists. It is fun to try all these interesting things. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
The worst thing is eating out and having to deal with friends and family who don't understand the diet. They think it is dangerous to eat this way and to not go listen to doctors. There aren't alot of raw foodists so it can be hard to have a good support circle. Also, some of the hard to find foods can be expensive and you should eat organic whenever possible so that can also get expensive!<br><br><br><br><b>7. How difficult is it to try and do raw based on a mostly "natural" set of foods. This may sound weird, but I hear about making things like crackers on a dehydrator and such. I am almost equating this to something along the lines of Tofu or something, where you really have to go through great lengths and process things to make a food product. I am wondering how difficult it is to avoid doing these things, or if I am exaggerating the "weirdness" of it.</b><br><br><br><br>
Hmm. I think I understand what you are saying. Raw food diet can easily be done by eating just raw veggies, fruits, spouts, nuts and seeds - just as they are when you buy them. You don't have to make crackers in a dehydrator if you don't want. It is not difficult to avoid doing these things at all. You don't <i>have</i> to eat raw dehydrated food to be a raw foodist. Making raw crackers and such just adds more variety to the diet. You can make things like Raw pizza, raw "ice cream", raw pies, etc. They take more time to make than eating the foods just as they are (alot of them not more time than making the cooked verisons of these) but if you want to get more variety into your diet once you have been raw a while - it might be something for you to consider. For me, it helps fill in for the cooked stuff I miss like corn chips and certain breads. Alot of the time-consuming recipes are things that are made to be like the cooked version we once ate but in raw form. If you are having a hard time and craving cooked things, you might feel it worth it to go the extra mile and make some of the more time-consuming dishes to ease your cravings. But like I said - not neccesary!<br><br><br><br><br><br>
I recommend the following raw books for recipes (tons of recipes all over the web too). Some recipes you will need a dehydrator and some just blender - a good variety:<br><br><br><br><br><br>
'The Complete Book of Raw food'. This has raw food recipes from tons of different and well-known raw foodists. It is like owning 10 raw food books. The recipes are unique and fun.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FComplete-Book-...%2Fdp%2F1578261430" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-.../dp/1578261430</a><br><br><br><br>
'Living on Live Food'. This has a lot recipes that are basically raw replacements for the cooked versions you used to eat. Raw Pizza!<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=veggieboards.com-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FLiving-Live-Fo...3292050%26sr%3D1-1" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Living-Live-Fo...3292050&sr=1-1</a><br><br><br><br>
Well, my post got long but I hope I helped clear some things up for you. Glad to see your interested. Raw eating can be fun if you make it be. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I really appreciate the responses.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rockon.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rockon:"> The David Wolfe book I was considering was the Sun Foods Diet book. Now I have a few to compare before making a decision which one (or two) to get.<br><br><br><br>
I understand variety, so that makes a lot of sense. I'll probably start thinking about a dehydrator. I'm not that big on juices, but I do drink coffee and tea outside of water. I'm going to plan on skipping the juicer for now. I guess coffee and tea are not really part of a raw food diet are they?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> Dang!<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the insight on grains and RDA. I had a feeling that was the general concept, but it makes me a bit nervous. Sounds like if I wanted to I could still include them, but probably have to make my own recipes.<br><br><br><br>
You mentioned easing into raw foods due to detox. This is just friendly debate here. From what I have read and come to understand, detox and diets is supposed to be a myth, and actually dangerous. Granted, this detox view is geared towards the kinds of diets where you just drink lemonade and maple syrup for a week, or that sort of thing. What makes a raw food diet the one that is real about it's detox claims, and is it proven to actually be detox, or could it be your body trying to tell you something? Again, not trying to start anything, I just like to think these things through and ask lots of questions.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>BlindLemonPep'r</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You mentioned easing into raw foods due to detox. This is just friendly debate here. From what I have read and come to understand, detox and diets is supposed to be a myth, and actually dangerous. Granted, this detox view is geared towards the kinds of diets where you just drink lemonade and maple syrup for a week, or that sort of thing. What makes a raw food diet the one that is real about it's detox claims, and is it proven to actually be detox, or could it be your body trying to tell you something? Again, not trying to start anything, I just like to think these things through and ask lots of questions.</div>
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I think that by "detox" QF meant that like with any diet change, there will be changes in your body. eating raw means that you'll be probably getting a lot more fiber, and cooked food is easier on digestion.<br><br><br><br>
plus, if you ate a lot of convienience foods before, you have been injesting a lot of preservatives and chemicals, so yeah, you will "detox" from that.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>BlindLemonPep'r</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks! I really appreciate the responses.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/rockon.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":rockon:"> The David Wolfe book I was considering was the Sun Foods Diet book. Now I have a few to compare before making a decision which one (or two) to get.<br><br><br><br>
I understand variety, so that makes a lot of sense. I'll probably start thinking about a dehydrator. I'm not that big on juices, but I do drink coffee and tea outside of water. I'm going to plan on skipping the juicer for now. I guess coffee and tea are not really part of a raw food diet are they?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> Dang!<br><br><br><br>
Thanks for the insight on grains and RDA. I had a feeling that was the general concept, but it makes me a bit nervous. Sounds like if I wanted to I could still include them, but probably have to make my own recipes.<br><br><br><br>
You mentioned easing into raw foods due to detox. This is just friendly debate here. From what I have read and come to understand, detox and diets is supposed to be a myth, and actually dangerous. Granted, this detox view is geared towards the kinds of diets where you just drink lemonade and maple syrup for a week, or that sort of thing. What makes a raw food diet the one that is real about it's detox claims, and is it proven to actually be detox, or could it be your body trying to tell you something? Again, not trying to start anything, I just like to think these things through and ask lots of questions.</div>
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David just rewrote the Sunfoods Diet book. I think that would be a good read. Pick up the 2006 version if you can. The chapters look like they would be a good informational starter book.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.sunfood.com/cgi-bin/order/index.cgi?id=279496564993&d=single&item_id=0003&c=Books&sc=Raw_Foods&tc=David_Wolfe" target="_blank">http://www.sunfood.com/cgi-bin/order...tc=David_Wolfe</a><br><br><br><br>
I think the Natures First Law might be a little radicial for a first read. Some people love it and some people hate it because it is quite direct and "in your face" about the evils of cooked food. I think go with the Sunfoods one first for general learning.<br><br><br><br>
Just an FYI, David will be speaking at the Chicago Green Festival (I noticed you are in the Midwest) coming up in April. Not often that a raw food speaker comes to the Midwest so I am going.<br><br><br><br>
Yes, sorry, coffee is out on the raw foods diet. More because of the roasting process than just because it is coffee itself. Sucks don't it!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> Actually, lots of raw foodists drink tea! David Wolfe sells teas on his site. Stick with herb teas with no added caffefine. Raw foodists eat chocolate too but it is raw chocolate (or cacao). It is the roasting that they are against (eating roasted anything is supposed to be bad - my bf is always saying that to me - I forget the exact chemistry of what it does to your body though). Raw chocolate is yummy!<br><br><br><br>
In the Sunfoods book, there is a section on detox which I am sure will explain it. Actually, detox is not a myth. For example, when you get a cold: you have all those cold 'symptoms' like headache, body aches, chills, fever, sweats, runny nose and cough right? These things are just your bodies way of trying to get some toxins out of your body and to try and heal itself. It is normally not thought in this way but that is what it is. Even when you sweat, your body is trying to get toxins out.<br><br><br><br>
The lemon and maple syrup thing sounds like the Master Cleanse. This is a kind of liquid fast. I think people do it more to lose weight. You don't have to do this at all. When you do any sort of fast, it gives your body a rest from digesting and gives it a chance to catch up. Since you are drinking just liquid, your body does practically no digesting at all so it puts more energy towards tasks like getting rid of toxins that have been sitting around and healing. It often said that bad food can hurt you twice: once on the way in (tummy aches, heartburn) and once on the way out (detox symptoms like headaches, diaherra). <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
Fasting of any sort is not required on a raw diet. But when you start eating fresh, organic raw food and no more processed, your body will start to detox out the processed stuff that has been sitting in there and it hasn't been able to digest. So, you might get some symptoms like headaches or maybe a little cold. You will feel great once they pass though. Don't worry about it - it is your body way of cleaning the bad stuff out and helping you heal. It is good process.<br><br><br><br>
I am sure David Wolfes book can explain it alot better than me. Don't worry about the cleansing and fasting stuff though for now.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>scarlet</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think that by "detox" QF meant that like with any diet change, there will be changes in your body. eating raw means that you'll be probably getting a lot more fiber, and cooked food is easier on digestion.<br><br><br><br>
plus, if you ate a lot of convienience foods before, you have been injesting a lot of preservatives and chemicals, so yeah, you will "detox" from that.</div>
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yes, that is what I meant! thanks for adding more! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Visit <a href="http://www.foodnsport.com" target="_blank">www.foodnsport.com</a> and pick up a copy of Dr. Doug Graham's 80/10/10 diet. I own many books on raw foods and this is by far my favorite. I find many things I read to be high in hyperbole and low in research. Not true of 80/10/10! Graham makes a case for what people should eat and why. He also goes into detail about common mistakes raw foodists make and how to avoid them. If you prefer a well-reasoned "why" behind a recommendation, I think you'll like the book.<br><br><br><br>
I've been vegan for 11 years, and had periods of all raw eating. The longest was a year, then I vacillated for a few months at a time, always coming back to the same types of cooked foods. I made mistakes in my earlier raw attempts, and I think those mistakes are common!<br><br><br><br>
I ate way too much fat in the form of nuts, seeds, olives and avocados. Way too much. I started my journey with raw cookbooks, like Juliano's. Most of the recipes use nuts or seeds as replacements for meat/tofu/etc. I spent insane amounts of time chopping, cutting, blending, sprouting, dehydrating, spiralizing - "gourmet" raw is consuming and, in my opinion, not particularly healthy. We ought to worry less about whether something is raw, and more about whether something is good for us! Do monkeys sit around their dehydrators waiting for the next batch of cookies to harden?<br><br><br><br>
Trying to replicate some favorite cooked dish is very much like a vegan eating a veggie burger and fries. It doesn't include meat, but it isn't necessarily super healthy, either. Some vegetarians want to have meat-like replacement foods, some don't. Those that do might feel their vegetarianism is denying them something they really want. If I don't want meat, why would I want to eat something that looks or tastes like meat? If I believe that tofu or cheese or chocolate is unhealthy or unnatural, why would I try to make a facsimile?<br><br><br><br>
Sooo, I kind of agree with not jumping through hoops to make bread and crackers and meatloafs and curried veggie gooballs (or whatever). More natural, simpler, seems to me like it's better. How would we eat as natural creatures? Can't believe I evolved or was created to be reliant on a dehydrator, a juicer, etc.<br><br><br><br>
The one appliance I use a lot is a VitaMix (power blender). That's about it. Knives and a manual citrus juicer round out my implements. My take is that blending is far superior to juicing, and eating whole is superior to blending.<br><br><br><br>
It takes almost no time to eat a meal of bananas or mangos or cherries or peaches or oranges or apples - you get the idea. It's quicker and easier to eat a head of romaine than to chop up vegetables for a gourmet salad and blend up some creamy topping.<br><br><br><br>
I don't eat any grains. I'm not convinced that they are "people" food. I track my nutritional intakes very carefully and don't see any troubles leaving them out.<br><br><br><br>
I like being raw because I feel I am living more naturally. It is simpler, I don't obsess over foods any more, I'm healthy, my waistline looks good, and I feel positive about my long term health prospects.<br><br><br><br>
Best of luck! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wideeyed.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":boobies:">
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the feedback everyone. Rawyear, I think you and I agree on the idea of "replacement foods".<br><br><br><br>
I have one outstanding question after reading a (one) book on this subject. Why is Nut Milk considered "neutral", and does not count as a fat-protein??? I am really having trouble getting my tiny brain around this concept. Anybody have any thoughts?<br><br><br><br>
I picked up the ONLY good raw book at the library that was currently in stock. "The Raw Food Detox Diet" by Natalia Rose. When I first finished it, I was convinced it was a total crock!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/evil.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":evil:"> Since the first chapter made it clear it was against all of my preconceived dietary guildeline ideas, I wrote down my "preconceived" ideas of a healthy diet from the USDA. After reading the book I was not convinced the two concepts could possibly work together, and I had WAY more questions than answers. Also, pretty much EVERYTHING the author stated as if it were data or fact in the book was not substantiated by any references, making them jsut seem like wild statements.<br><br><br><br>
I decided to write down what I learned about the diet from the book, and my outstanding questions. I then went back through the book a second time to see if I could resolve my questions, and I did (except one, the nut milk question above). So the author did not contradict hereself as I originally thought, it was just very, very confusing and not cohesively presented.<br><br><br><br>
I believe this diet as presented by this book is WAY too high in fat, and possibly provides the reader with info, that the reader can only work out on their own, to involve ingesting possibly too many sugars on an empty stomach which may cause diabetic concerns. I also found the book a little too quick to point out the best products to buy like juicers, etc, and the websites of where to get them. Those websites buy they way mentione the book, so I'm sure there's a mutually beneficial agreement involved here at some level. Not that this is truly awful, but does not look good in my opinion.<br><br><br><br>
I am giving this book (actually diet) a shot however, and working on making a menu that both works within the guidelines of this book and with the US RDA.<br><br><br><br>
My concerns with sugars in the morning is that the book says fruits should be eaten alone with nothing else, and should only be taken on a completely empty stomach, preferably in the morning. It is not an easy task to come up with a fruit-only breakfast that does not contain around 70% of calories from sugar. Not impossible however, but options are SEVERELY limited.<br><br><br><br>
Then comes the nuts/seeds/dried fruits meal, which is very high in fat. Granted, they are good fats, but just because it's a good fat doesn't mean you should be eating meals consisting of 60% or more of the total calories from these fats. The natural conclusion one would come to for this kind of meal is to have nuts/seeds/dried fruits in or with a salad having green leafy vegetables and other "neutral" veggies. For this salad there would be a dressing of course to make it more appetizing, but adding a raw dressing in addition to the nuts quickly pushes the fat in this meal into some wild territory (in my opinion). I have decided for my purposes to keep it reasonably low in fat, and since breakfast would be very low in fat this meal can make up for the low fat breakfast of fruit.<br><br><br><br>
As for the starches meal, I think there are many options, but hopefully there are some fats left available to eat that day to allow them in the meal somewhere. I haven't attempted to work out any dishes for this yet, so I don't hav much to say aobut this yet.<br><br><br><br>
So my primary concerns going into this diet after reading this book are the morning spike in blood sugar from the fruits, and the careless nature that oils are presented (they are neutral). This could cause someone I think to have an unhealthy dieat and not be aware of it. Then again, the premise as stated by the author is that despite being unconventional, it works. So I will try it, but not in a carefree manner like the author sugested, but instead balance this with USDA recommendations.<br><br><br><br>
I am curious to find out from the USDA info online what the need for grains is outside of fiber and starch. I want to ensure that the otheer sources of starch and fiber on this diet suffice. I suspect they may, but I don't trust this author because she did not back any of her claims with anything other than "I said so".
 

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Something you might find helpful is tracking your daily nutrition for a few days (or weeks). <a href="http://www.nutridiary.com" target="_blank">www.nutridiary.com</a> is a good, free, online tool.
 

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<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>BlindLemonPep'r</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Thanks for the feedback everyone. Rawyear, I think you and I agree on the idea of "replacement foods".<br><br><br><br>
I have one outstanding question after reading a (one) book on this subject. Why is Nut Milk considered "neutral", and does not count as a fat-protein??? I am really having trouble getting my tiny brain around this concept. Anybody have any thoughts?<br><br><br><br>
I picked up the ONLY good raw book at the library that was currently in stock. "The Raw Food Detox Diet" by Natalia Rose. When I first finished it, I was convinced it was a total crock!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/evil.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":evil:"></div>
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I haven't read this book but, as I understand it, this book is geared towards people who want to lose weight. Lately, there are some raw foodist writers who are trying to get people into raw by presenting it as a weight loss diet. Not that that is bad or good - well, I don't agreee with doing that but it is good if it gets people interested in raw. I mean, yes, you will lose weight on it and you will get healthier but I hope the people who do it for this reason will still stick with it in some way once the weight is dropped.<br><br><br><br>
I would really pick up a different book but it is up to you. Pick up one by a long time well known raw foodist like David Wolfe, Dr. Graham, Gabriel Cousens or the Buentenkos. I don't think you are going to find much in the library as far as raw food books go. If you want to save money, I would order a used book through Amazon or something. (you will find that not all the raw foodists agree on every littlle thing nutrition wise too - some are into greens, some fruit and some superfoods.)<br><br><br><br>
Like I mentioned before the majority of raw foodists don't follow the USDA recommendations. The USDA is based on a meat-based SAD diet and raw foodists don't follow that. Many of them also do not go to traditional doctors as they feel doctors don't know much about nutrition and only know how to medicate. They look at food as being their medicine. They let go of all of the traditional thinking of a balanced diet like the USDA recommends.<br><br><br><br>
If you are looking for a bunch of facts that are backed up by doctors and USDA, I don't think you are going to find too much of it the raw food books you read. Many traditional doctors think that the raw diet is dangerous. For the most part, feeling the transformation of the raw diet is what makes people believers. Than they show their doctors and the doctors are believers....but that doesn't make the doctors recommend it to all their patients!<br><br><br><br>
You might want to consider consulting a naturopath (I think that is what they call them) that supports a raw foods diet and knows about nutrition. They might be able to help you with matching up what you eat raw with the USDA if you are really set on doing that way.<br><br><br><br>
Not sure about the nut milk thing. I never heard that before. My guess would be because the meat is removed.<br><br><br><br>
Also lots of raw foodists eat just fruit or juices in the morning. But many do it in smoothies. Alot drink green (vegetable) smoothies as well. Many eat other things but usually keep it light.
 
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