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Hi, everyone. I've heard that longtime vegetarians who start to introduce meat into their diet have trouble digesting it, but can't find any information about it online. Anyone know?<br><br><br><br>
I've been an ovo/lacto vegetarian for about 12 years, and mostly vegan for the last year. I'll be traveling to a small village in Iceland for about a week and am worried about both being polite and getting enough nutrients. It's a very fish-centric culture, and while I'll avoid it as much as possible, I'd like to know if I'd have digestion problems if I did eat fish.<br><br><br><br>
Any information about introducing small amounts of fish into a long-time vegetarian's diet?
 

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i was vegan for three years before i started eating fish again, and i had no problems.<br><br><br><br>
i don't eat dairy or eggs, and haven't in 5 or 6 years, maybe longer, but if i do, dairy will cause horrible digestive issues. eggs, not so much.
 

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I accidently ate some of a salad with anchovie flavoring and it thankfully didn't do anything, but i would be careful about eating a hunk of flesh. I have been made violently ill by unknown-to-me chicken broth in food at restaurants.
 
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i once accidently had less than a mouthful of tuna, hidden in a tomato pasta sauce thing, after about 5 years of not eating fish- and i found that it really upset my stomach. you might be fine though, i guess it depends on lots of factors.<br><br><br><br>
if i thought i'd end up eating fish while travelling and that it'd be pretty much unavoidable, i think i'd probably try some fish a few times, quite a while before i went, just incase.<br><br><br><br>
i'd rather know if it was gonna upset my stomach, and/or give my body a chance to get used to it and/or time to develop some fish avoidance strategies, while i was at home, and not risk having fish induced stomach aches spoiling my trip.<br><br><br><br>
perhaps if you're eating with friends or family, or at a deli, or buffet or something, you could try a few very small pieces of fish, and see how you go. if it goes ok, you could safely try a little more. i'm not trying to encourage you to eat fish for the sake of it, but to get your body used to it, if you're going to be eating it anyway.<br><br><br><br>
i'd also consider that lots of people get upset stomach issues when travelling anyway, be it to do with the change in timezone, climate, food prep, ingredients, hygeine, local bugs, yucky aeroplane recycled air, stress, or whatever. taking a good quality probiotic for a month before you go, and while you're away, would give your digestive system a bit of support to deal with all of that stuff, which wouldn't be a bad idea in my books.
 

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I could be terribly wrong, but I don't think you will have that much trouble sticking to a vegetarian diet in Iceland. Vegetarianism is usually an accepted thing anymore. We should not be ashamed to say, " No Thank you... I am a veg*n. " If someone is offended by that, then they must not be the best of people to begin with.
 

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I've known a few people who have eaten meat after years of vegetarianism, and they did not tell me they got sick from it. Just as a sudden diet change from omni to vegan can involve a lot of stomach and gas, I would imagine the same would be true for a sudden switch from vegetarian to omni.
 

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Dairy can be quite upsetting to your stomach if you ingest any substantial amounts, so look out for that. I don't know about fish.<br><br><br><br>
Personally, I would never voluntarily eat fish of meat just to be polite. And Iceland <i>is</i> actually part of the civilised world, so there's no reason why they should be offended by the fact that some people don't eat fish or meat. Bring your own foods (pasta, canned beans, canned chickpeas, soya milk, nuts, breakfast cereal, soups, bread, biscuits ... etc.), and try and arrange it so that you get access to a kitchen where you can cook for yourself. Surely the Icelanders eat at least some vegetables, so you don't need to bring that. Bring some multivitamins if you are still worried that you will not get enough nutrients.<br><br><br><br>
What if you were a person with severe food allergies? Should you still be expected to eat things that made you sick? I don't think so.
 

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Yea, I agree with that also. Your values are your values, and what makes them values is that they are not negotiable. No one should be offended if you politely explain that it is against your ethics (or however you put it) to eat meat. You can even add in that it has been X long, and youor body is no longer used to it.
 

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So long as you're not rude, and don't go out of your way to confront folks who DO eat meat, I doubt you'll offend people. You'll only be there a week, so if you wish, you can bring some food along with you to the village- dry perhaps, which would be more compact and easy to carry, so you'll be able to cook it when you get there.<br><br><br><br>
Surely at least some people in Iceland like grain products, fruit and vegetables, legumes. You said you're mostly vegan now, but if it turns out that your options for eating are REALLY limited, maybe for this one week you can ease up on that and go lacto-ovo, provided you're not lactose-intolerant.
 

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Very few fish today are safe to eat. WIld alaskan salmon are the only kind I know of that have no toxins and have omega 3. ANd a lot of wild alaskan salmon is labelled wild when its actually farmed and toxic.<br><br><br><br>
I've heard eating saurkraut with fish helps it digest..because of the fermented lactic acid or something.
 
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