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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone. I'm thinking of going vegetarian my food budget is £20-£25 per week for the two of us. We cook all our food from scratch but have no access to land to grow our own. An allotment is not possible for us.
Is a vegetarian lifestyle possible on such a low budget?

The Mr has Sjögren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease does anyone know if a vegetarian diet would benefit him.

Thank you.
 

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Josephine, can you tell me what sorts of foods you buy each week with that budget before going vegetarian?

I just read the Mayoclinic page on Sjogen's syndrome. The only dietary recommendation there is that the person drink lots of water, try to stimulate saliva flow to relieve dry-mouth symptoms, and then to brush one's teeth after every meal. I didn't see anything that would indicate that a vegetarian diet would affect it in any way. But, then again, I am not a doctor, so if you are very concerned, you should consult an expert.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi thanks for replying.

We currently live on pasta, rice, porridge, cous cous, potatoes and home made bread. The cheapest mince, value cooking bacon, frozen value chicken portions. Vegetables cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, onions, garlic, peppers, courgettes, squash, parsnips, carrots, mushrooms, frozen peas, spinach and sweetcorn. A large pot of plain yoghurt, cheese, milk, margarine stuff, eggs. Pulses and beans. Spices and i grow herbs on my windowsill. Lemons, apples, bananas.

That's my shopping list and with that we make large pots of pasta sauce to last about 5 days in various guises, lasagne, chilli, etc. Mixed veg and potatoes baked with bacon in cheese sauce. Roast chicken, chicken curry with dahl and spinach, kebabs with roast veggies flat breads hummus and yoghurt mint dip, cottage pie, savoury rice. Soups which have pulses and the leftover veggies in.

That's pretty much it.

I posted on the Sjogren's forum about any benefits from the change in diet, i don't think it will have any adverse effects i just need more ammo in my argument for a veggie diet because i'm going to meet a lot of resistance.
 

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Wow, it sounds like you are already on your way. I would just cut out the animal proteins and replace with Tofu, Tempeh or Seitan. If you are giving up milk and cheese, then you can replace with Almond Milk and Nutritional Yeast etc. I am not expert and I am sure others with have a lot more helpful tips. You definitely eat better than I do even if you were to just delete the chickent and meat and keep everything else the same.
 

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Well, I would just replace the meat in that with more beans, tofu, or textured veggie protein. It doesn't sound like you eat all that much meat. For any soups, replace chicken stock with vegetable stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks you two, as i re-read my post i thought the same. I just have to cut out or replace the meat. I won't be giving up milk, cheese or eggs (for now). I understand there are vegetarian cheeses out there so i'll get reading and see what i can find.

The difficult bit is to persuade Mr Man now. Mmmm I'm going to have to flatter his ego by getting him to use his imagination in the kitchen.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dormouse View Post

Well, I would just replace the meat in that with more beans, tofu, or textured veggie protein. It doesn't sound like you eat all that much meat. For any soups, replace chicken stock with vegetable stock.
Exactly. Beans are almost always the cheapest protein source around.
Tofu is usually pretty inexpensive and TVP is likewise often cheap (but harder to find).
Homemade seitan is another good option.
All of the above can go into soups and sauces like what you mentioned you normally eat.
Where you use bacon or ground beef try TVP or seitan. Where you use chicken try tofu or tempeh.

For snacks or sack lunches, an option for low-cost/high-protein is peanut butter or hummus. Peanut butter (or just peanuts) is almost always pretty cheap and hummus can be cheap if you make it yourself.
 
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