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I'm new to vegetarianism, and am redoing my kitchen to go veg for the 1st of the year. I am very excited and can't wait to see how this lifestyle works for me. I want to be dedicated to making the change to vegetarian, and maybe someday vegan (I am going to try to do it in steps so I don't blow it!), anyways, my boyfriend is Italian and a BIG meat-eater (I don't know if he'd ever consider going veg, unless he say a huge difference in me afterwards), and he eats meat pretty much every meal. My question is: how do I continue to have meals with him (at home or out to eat) where I can sort of satisfy us both, without having to make two totally separate meals? We work alot and dont have much time to cook or anything, so making two different things for a meal is almost impossible. Thanks for any tips and advice. I still want to cook for him and try to eat more at home, I just don't have time to spend hours in the kitchen. (I'm hoping to get him to like some of my veggie dishes so that he can see there are good tasting and satisfying foods out there that don't include meat).
 

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Traditional Italian cooking is closer to vegetarian than to the Italian food in the USA which is heavy on the meat. Italian food includes a lot of meatless meals. It does rely on cheese though-- The first stuff I started to eat as a new vegetarian was Italian food: marinara sauce with pasta, mushroom risoto, baked zitti, lasagnia with eggplant, canonelli bean soups. You could go for weeks streight on only Italian food and never touch meat.<br><br><br><br>
Ways to cut down on kitchen time are to make a lot of food at once and freeze it so you can simply microwave it as you need it. Using a crock pot (slow cooker) for sauces, stews, soups is less time consuming and you dont need to watch it.<br><br><br><br>
many dishes can be frozen and then thawed prior to re-heating, like chili, and bean soup. I've even cooked pasta (zitti is good for this) put it in single serve containers and microwaved it for lunch.<br><br><br><br>
The only way that I can see you eating together is if his meat is cooked seperately. For example, meatballs added to the spaghetti at the table, or ground meat added to the vegetarian chili later. Either that or make a complete seperate dinner. Also encouraging him to at least cut down on meat should make him healthier-- oatmeal or cerial in the morning, not ham and eggs.<br><br><br><br>
Obviously explain what you are doing and try to work out a compromise. Serving size for meat is, I believe no more than 3 "playing card size" servings per day, preferably less, and this includes peanut butter, tofu, eggs and other protien sources. Many meat eaters I know can literally eat 3 times more than the reccomended allowance per day. For health reasons he needs to get down to at least the "food pyramid" if he expects a longer and healthier life.<br><br><br><br>
I have also seen that many "boyfriends" of vegetarians will do most of their meat eating away from the house so their SO's will not have to cook or handle meat. Frankly, I would tell him that if he wants to eat meat, he should cook it himself and also do his own dishes.
 

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my husband is omnivorous. i am ovo-lacto vegetarian, though at least one or two of my daily meals/snacks (6 total) are vegan. my husband is basicly the same (one or two vegan meals, the rest omnivorous).<br><br><br><br>
typically, we make a vegan meal, and then we add to that whatever we want. for example, i always make soup and salad or some form of veggie. the soup is usually vegan, as is the salad. my husband likes roasted chicken, so he often puts that on his. I'll add cheese or hard boiled eggs to my meal if i want to.<br><br><br><br>
this way, the basic meal is vegetarian/vegan--and very simple, and he can add to it whatever he wants.<br><br><br><br>
one italian example that i used in my own home for guests with different dietary needs:<br><br><br><br>
i made a simple veggie lasagne. it was literally layers of vegan noodles, thinly sliced vegetables marinated in pesto sauce, and tomato sauce. i served this lasagne with four sauce options: a tomato sauce with meat, a cheese sauce (alfredo), a pesto sauce, and a tomato sauce without meat.<br><br><br><br>
i served it with a large "white" salad (it's white and green only)--two kinds of green lettuces (i used romaine and escarole), white onions, celery, and cucumber. i made a dressing of white balsalmic vinegar, olive oil, and sea salt.<br><br><br><br>
this meal satisfied everyone and didn't require "making two meals." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> you can do this with any numbe rof things. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I did like zoebird when I lived with an omni.<br><br>
I made dishes that could have meat added <i>IF</i> he felt the need.<br><br>
I'd make bean burritos and if he wanted ground beef he could add it.<br><br>
Spaghetti with marinara sauce, I'd cook up some meatballs on the side for him. (Though eventually he got so he liked those Trader Joe's vegetarian ones better than the beef ones).<br><br>
Stir fry with veggies adn noodles or rice and he could add some chicken if he felt the need.<br><br>
Tacos with a choice of veggie "crumbles" or beef.<br><br>
Pasta salad with veggies, I'd have some chicken cubes he could add to his.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
In 15 years of marriage, I NEVER EVER said "cook your own" or "do your own meat dishes" but my (then) hubby ended up preferring many of the vegetarian options I'd make for myself, and eventually I could skip the meat option for most meals all together.<br><br><br><br>
There are literally hundreds of similar threads and situations like yours if you search the board, you'll get great ideas!
 

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I live with an omni. All our meals at home are vegetarian (most are vegan). When he orders out or we go to dinner, he gets meat. We also have cans of tuna fish or some deli meat in the fridge for him to pack for lunch. Meat isn't ever cooked in the house, and we don't ever purchase meat other than for his lunches.<br><br>
He's a fairly hardcore meat eater, but he respects me and my diet and does not ask me to make him meat. He's just happy that I cook for him at all <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">
 
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