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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I feel as though I finally after almost 40 years of life, have gotten my mind right (well about being veggie anyway). I feel really, really good with my decision. My family (husband and 2 young boys) go along w/ me for the most part. I do the cooking so they eat what I make...or starve...lol.<br><br><br><br>
There was a hot dog revolt this weekend. They shopped and grilled for themselves (husband had to admit later that he felt better when I cook, yeah). As for regular grocery shopping, I just stopped buying meat about a month ago and really think I would feel like a hypocrite buying it even if it wasn't for me. Do any of you still buy meat for the other people in your household if they ask? And what about holidays, if you are inviting guests over do you buy the ham or turkey because they expect it to be there? Just avoiding meat seems to be fine (so far, I only had to deal w/ it out just once and I was really proud of myself). But the expectations of holiday food, hmmmm...Just wondering how you handle it.<br><br><br><br>
My friend said something that seemed good in a way. I never thought of it because to me things seemed to be very black and white, right or wrong... She said, buy a small ham for those who eat meat. We like it when people accomodate our veggie wishes. Thought provoking I thought, yet seemed to fall in the wrong category.
 

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I don't buy or prepare meat for anyone. Actually, that's not entirely true, because every once in a while I'll pick up a restaraunt bill even if someone at the table has ordered meat. But I never buy meat at the grocery store.<br><br><br><br>
What your friend said about how omnivores accomodate our dietary wishes so we should accomodate theirs is commonly said. It's not a very good argument though. An omnivore buying vegetables for a vegetarian is not the same thing as a vegetarian buying meat for a meat-eater, because the omni doesn't have to do anything that goes against their morals to feed the vegetarian. For many vegetarians (myself included) it is immoral to buy meat. Most meat-eaters aren't morally opposed to buying vegetables.
 

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I don't buy or cook meat for anyone else. I'm fortunate that my husband is now vegetarian and I don't share the house with anyone else, and even before he was vegetarian he didn't cook meat at home. I've cooked Christmas dinner a few times for various family members and just told them beforehand that there won't be any meat, and no-one has had a problem with that or refused to turn up. I figure if they want meat, they can eat it at home the day before or something. I see it as an opportunity to feed them new and exciting food they wouldn't otherwise have, and they seem to appreciate something different from the same old stuff they always have. Although I haven't yet tried cooking for my uncle who refuses to eat any form of vegetable and whose idea of 'proper' food is either beef stew or McDonald's...<br><br><br><br>
I don't see meat eaters cooking vegetarian food for vegetarians as the same thing as vegetarians cooking meat for omnis. As has already been said, omnivores don't generally have moral/ethical objections to preparing meat-free food in the same way that many vegetarians object to purchasing meat. Also their food doesn't *have* to contain meat in order for them to be able to eat it, so if you feed them a vegetarian or vegan meal you are providing perfectly adequate food that they can eat (assuming that they're not allergic to any of the ingredients), whereas if everything an omni cooks contains meat, their vegetarian guest(s) will not be able to eat anything.
 

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When I make quesadillas my mom makes sure that I buy chicken. I hate it, I feel so guilty for buying it. But, if I didn't she would yell at me and stuff and get my upset. She doesn't support me at all. So I have to buy meat for them if I'm cooking. I can't wait until I move out because my boyfriend is vegetarian.
 

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I have an omni hubby and 3 omni kids (they were raised that way by me but I'm working on them, hubby however will never change). I not only buy his meat for him but I cook it too (he's a night shift worker and someone has to cook for him! and he won't eat veg). I'm not entirely happy about it but I'll work on not buying it in the future when he's home to cook sometimes for himself <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">
 

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Well cant you just ask them (your guest)if they would mind going vegetarian while they are over for the holidays that way at lest it breaks the ice that you are vegetarian<br><br><br><br>
I noticed my mother always buys in the meat (she is veg) when they have guest staying ......and she hates it
 

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I prepared Thanksgiving dinner, soup to nuts, this year for my family and my boyfriend's family and there wasn't a turkey anywhere in sight! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> Everyone was stuffed to the gills and no one complained about the lack of corpse either.<br><br>
So my answer is no... I don't even deal with meat for guests on holidays <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I do buy meat for guests when they come over b/c they ALWAYS have veggies for me and things that I can eat. It works both ways!!
 

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When it comes to Holiday food I never serve meat but everyone that would come over knows this and someone always brings a turkey. All the other food seems to be gobbled up without notice of the lack of meat. There were a few years in the beginning that I would not even allow meat in the house though I've had to relax that policy. My fiance buys the groceries (pays for) so if he wants meat he buys it. I really can't do anything about that and I love him so... it's just in what you can and are willing to do <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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I wouldn't buy people meat, a lot of my friends take us all out for pizza on birthdays etc and I know if I was buying everyone pizza I would say they all have to be vegetarian (I'd let them know before them came though!) because I don't want my money to go to an industry I consider immoral, equally I don't want my money to raise demand for something featuring a food I consider immoral.<br><br><br><br>
I would <b>never</b> expect someone to serve me food they thought was ethically incorrect. If someone thought eating a vegetarian meal was morally wrong I wouldn't expect them to serve me one, I wouldn't eat at their house or have them pay for my food.<br><br><br><br>
However the exception to this would be if I accidental bought food with meat in, and then I would give this to a meat eating friend or whatever.<br><br><br><br>
We have people eat at our house regularly and have never served them meat, they don't seem to mind. In fact my brothers friends said my mum cooks the best food out of all their friends house holds (and some of them are very avid meat eaters) and equally all my friends say our food is delicious.<br><br><br><br>
Of course, I'm always very grateful when someone prepares me a vegetarian meal however I don't see this akin to serving an omni meat.<br><br><br><br>
I think there is such a <b>huge</b> difference between inconveniencing someone and asking them to change their ethical beliefs though.
 

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I don't buy meat for anyone...I don't even like to have meat in our refrigerator or freezer. Bf's old roomie was staying with us for a short time last year, and he had meat in the fridge and freezer, he cooked bacon, etc - I just couldn't handle seeing it or smelling it in our home, but I didn't feel like I could tell him not to have it around me...I was so happy when he moved out!
 

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I made a ham sandwich for someone the other day (was in their house). I scrubbed my hands repeatedly afterwards, felt so guilty, and definately won't be contributing in any way to other people eating meat again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Meka2829</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
You live with carnivores?</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I just found out through the "pet Peeves" thread that this is a no no to say. oops! just being a smartie pants, I guess.
 

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If it's just a couple of guests, I'll fix something that everyone will like, like pizza or pasta (with no meat). However, here very soon we are going to have to cook a lot of meat for other people. It's a dilema, but here it is: we are going to have to replace our roof here in the next month or so, and the insurance company did not give us enough money to pay someone to do it (which ticks me off), so we are going to have to rely on friends and family to help us out (for free). So, we are going to bbq a bunch of sausage for everyone else, make potato salad, and have lots of dipping veggies, bean dip/chips too. We'll probably buy some veggie burgers for us. I really hate to do it (purchase meat), but this is one of those little hunting towns where everyone has meat at every meal, and I'm just so thankful that people are willing to get up on our roof in the Texas summer I'm going to feed them what they want.
 

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Another way to look at this, which doesn't involve the "asking someone to do something against their beliefs" angle, is this -<br><br><br><br>
If you are hosting someone for a meal, it is expected that, as a good host, you will respect any dietary restrictions they may have.<br><br><br><br>
It is <b>not</b> expected that the guests get to choose the menu. As host, that is your prerogative.<br><br><br><br>
In other words, <i>restrictions</i> are different from <i>preferences.</i>
 
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