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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try not to drag this out, but I have two rabbits Flopsy and Pip, with the former two or so years older, and both female. My sister owned both of them (not at the same time), but was forced to leave them here because she was moving from one apartment to another, and we thought it'd be best for them to have a garden to run around in. Anyway, they've been together now for a year and a half, maybe more. At first, Flopsy would chase Pip around quite aggressively. Yet they've gradually become more social, but still have the odd chase about. Anyway, recently they've been joined at the hip! They sit snuggled up like an old couple and also take turns to clean one another. Then today, whilst my father was stroking Flopsy, Pip came up behind her and mounted her intensely.<br><br><br><br>
Is this quite natural? I assume it's because rabbits are quite temperamental and have high sex-drives?
 

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It's possible that they are, but they probably just like to hump (sorry <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"> that's a bit crude, but amusing to me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/tongue3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":p">). Most animals do. Think about humans. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br>
I had two kittens. They were brothers and joined at the hip. One time I did walk into the room to find one mounting the other as the other one just sat there like nothing was going on. But most animals like to, and will, mount and go for it. Think about dogs humping legs... Are they perpetually attracted to legs? No, they just have urges.<br><br><br><br>
It's kinda strange that a female is doing it though which I haven't seen in other animals apart from humans. She must derive some sort of satisfaction, I imagine.
 
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have you been feeding them tofu? cos we all know soy makes you turn gay.<br><br><br><br>
sorry, i don't have anything practical to add, but if you're very sure they're both female, and they're both happy with the arrangement, i don't see it being a big problem, at least.
 

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What a great name for a rabbit... flopsy! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/laugh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lol:"><br><br><br><br>
We call our bunny "flopsalotsa" sometimes.<br><br><br><br>
Are they spayed?<br><br><br><br>
Before Tippy (female) was spayed she would quite aggressively chase, mount, and hump my male cat Mooey. Now, that's not lesbian activity, but it is interspecial. I tend to think of it like "if you can't be with the one you love, love the one you're with." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think the biggest shock is Flopsy letting her do it! She's even been letting her into the shed to eat (which is usually Flopsy's territory). My mother suggested it might be because Flopsy's getting old and so wants someone to look after her.<br><br><br><br><b>@meatless</b> - Nope, they're not spayed. I certainly think your philosophy could apply here! Pip's always been quite inquisitive towards Flopsy, but the latter's not known for being too social.
 

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I think that's an expression of dominance rabbits use socially- it might put humans off, but maybe it's a less violent way of working out dominance than fighting.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think that's an expression of dominance rabbits use socially- it might put humans off, but maybe it's a less violent way of working out dominance than fighting.</div>
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yeah i think there's definitely a dominance factor too. Mooey is the alpha cat at our house, and tippy didn't even try to hump either of the other two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't know about dominance. I mean, Flopsy is bigger than Pip, and she'll still move out of the way if Flopsy comes tumbling towards her. It only seems more like Flopsy is tolerating her, more than anything.
 

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I don't think it's anything to be concerned about. I think it's nice that they each have someone (and something to do) to keep them entertained. It's surprising the number of animals that enjoy a bit of gay love. My friend had two boy rabbits who were very good 'friends' as well.
 

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It is a dominance issue,Pip has decided she is the alpha female and flopsy accepting it.They'll still have spats though!My rabbits still do this on occasion,both are altered.
 

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My spayed dog did that to my grandmother's spayed dog while we were at my grandmother's house (in the other dog's territory). The other dog wasn't happy about it, though.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>meatless</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
yeah i think there's definitely a dominance factor too. Mooey is the alpha cat at our house, and tippy didn't even try to hump either of the other two.</div>
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<br><br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/yes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":yes:"><br><br><br><br><br><br>
Animals can not be "lesbians". They mate for the reason of reproduction.
 

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Tom<br><br>
"I think that's an expression of dominance rabbits use socially- it might put humans off, but maybe it's a less violent way of working out dominance than fighting."<br><br><br><br>
Why would rabbits need to express dominance, or "work out" dominance?
 

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In the wild when the alpha male in a wolf pack wins a fight with another wolf in the pack they have been known to mount the loser and get them to carry them. I'll try to find the source where I read that for you.<br><br>
Back to rabbits: I had two sisters. One was very aggressive and would hump her sister but not from the back! She would hump the other one's face! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shocked.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":eek:"><br><br>
Pretty sure that it was for dominance :p Also, just because Pip is smaller doesnt mean that she cant be the dominant one <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> Our Basset Hound rules our other dogs including our old ex-guard dog! Shes never humped them though :p
 

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Soilman, I think it has to do with deciding who gets first pick where to dig their burrow... stuff like that. But I'm not sure. I adopted two rabbits back in 2000. They're both neutered, and were starting to scuffle before they got snipped. Each of them has their own cage, and when they're out in the house (under my supervision), they like to hang out together. But even now, when I give them carrot, broccoli, slices of fruit, etc, Franz (the smaller one)* often tries to grab it from Franz, even though I go out of my way to make sure they BOTH get their share. Social animals often act like they have to know where they stand rank-wise with each other.<br><br><br><br>
*...I think Wayne_D said that his smaller rabbit tries to boss the bigger one around. It's the same deal with my two. Hans outweighs Franz by maybe about 15-20%, but Franz has more of an attitude.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think that's an expression of dominance rabbits use socially- it might put humans off, but maybe it's a less violent way of working out dominance than fighting.</div>
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Yep yep.<br><br><br><br>
Mounting is a show of dominance and nothing more between same sex animals. Your rabbit is saying "I am the boss" and the other is submissing and permitting the "head rabbit" to take the lead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tom</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
*...I think Wayne_D said that his smaller rabbit tries to boss the bigger one around. It's the same deal with my two. Hans outweighs Franz by maybe about 15-20%, but Franz has more of an attitude.</div>
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Oh no, Pip doesn't show much aggression. It's always been Flopsy (the larger and older one) who has done the chasing and shown an aggressive streak. For a good while now, Pip has always tried sneaking up on her to sniff her behind, but a lot of the time it annoys Flopsy so she responds aggressively. See, that's why I was unsure about the dominance thing. Unless it's subtle, you couldn't really say Pip is calling the shots. She doesn't bully Flopsy or anything, from what we've seen. To me, it's like Flopsy's attitude's changed, not that Pip's suddenly taken charge. Could be wrong though.<br><br><br><br><b>@Serenstar -</b> Hehe! Yes, I've seen rabbits going for it the wrong way around before. Seems to epitomize their hyperactive sex-drive in one act!
 

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there are lesbian koalas down under <a href="http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/story.cfm?c_id=500834&objectid=10425714" target="_blank">http://www.nzherald.co.nz/category/s...ectid=10425714</a>
 

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I had two female rabbits at one time that did the same thing. And I met a lady who had a rabbit rescue and knew everything there was to know about rabbits so I asked her about this and she said it was the same as dogs smelling each others butts, humans shaking hands and so on. It is just something that they do and has nothing to do with sex or domination. I don't know...she seemed to know what she was talking about and I never questioned it again.
 

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HAHAHAHA! I think it is completely possible! Rabbits seem to have a mad sex drive. When my hubby was living with his brother, his SIL had a bunny, and she mounted our cat! The cat had crawled in under the edge of the cage, and the bunner went to town on him! Poor, traumatized kitty!
 
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