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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lebanese Falafel<br><br>
Category: Sandiwches/Burgers<br><br><br><br>
Suitable for a: vegan diet<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Ingredients:<br><br>
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1 pound of fava beans<br><br><br><br>
½ pound of garbanzo beans<br><br><br><br>
1 large white onion, finely chopped<br><br><br><br>
¼ cup dried parsley, lightly packed<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon dried cilantro<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon granulated garlic<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon baking powder<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon sea salt<br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon ground cumin<br><br><br><br>
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper<br><br><br><br>
½ cup water<br><br><br><br><br><br>
1 tablespoon sodium bicarbonate<br><br><br><br><br><br>
1 gallon canola oil<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Instructions:<br><br>
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Place fava and garbanzo beans in a bowl with sodium bicarbonate. Cover 2” deep with warm water, stir, cover, and refrigerate overnight. Grind the soaked beans finely with a meat grinder. Mix ground beans in a bowl with onion, parsley, cilantro, garlic, baking powder, salt, cumin, cayenne, and water. Form the mix into meatball-sized pieces (about 32-35 balls). Heat canola oil to 375° in deep fryer. Fry 8 balls at a time for 6 minutes. Drain on a paper towel-covered rack. Freeze unused portion.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Additional comments:<br><br>
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This is a tried-and-true procedure that I've made many times. I've invariably had nothing but favorable responses from people when serving them this falafel. If you carry the recessive gene that makes cilantro taste like soap to you, just omit it. I can't imagine it would effect the final quality of the falafel.
 

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I made a version of this last night. I've been trying to hold out until I could find a store that sold fava beans, but I've had a huge craving for falafel, so I decided to bite the bullet and use all garbonzo beans.<br><br><br><br>
I had fresh garlic, parsely and cilantro on hand so I substituted that for dried which I think probably added a more pronounced flavor. I also added about a teaspoon of crushed red pepper flakes for a little kick.<br><br><br><br>
I only let the mix sit in the refrigerator for a couple hours and was having trouble getting the mix to form solid balls, so I added a couple tablespoons of flour to help that out.<br><br><br><br>
It turned out pretty good, but now I am really curious to get a hold of some fava beans as it seems everyone comments that fava beans really add a good flavor to the falafel. Even my usual standby small local organic grocery store doesn't carry them and they usually have just about every dried bean known to man.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/brood.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":brood:">
 

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Oh, also do you make your own tahini sauce? I tried last night and it didn't turn out so well. I watered down some tahini paste and added lemon juice and garlic but it tasted kind of chalky so I ended up drizzling a little bit of Annie's Goddess dressing on my falafel instead.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/juggle.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":juggle:">
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fortunately for me, fava beans are easy to obtain anywhere in the greater Los Angeles area, as is damn near anything else. If all else fails, try <a href="http://www.bobsredmill.com/catalog/index.php?action=showdetails&product_ID=169" target="_blank">Bobs Red Mill</a>.
 

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Any good middle-eastern/meditteranean grocery should have fava beans. I stock up on dried ones when I go to North Dallas. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dried beans. Also, I recently found out that deep frying in canola oil might not be a very good idea. Im led to believe now that safflower or sunflower oil might be a better choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Deep frying in olive oil sounds like an interesting concept. The expense could easily be mitigated by filtering the oil after each use and reusing it over and over again. But why not extra-virgin? What would happen?
 

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Extra virgin starts to smoke and burn at a pretty low temp, so it's not good for frying at all. It is also more expensive than plain olive oil. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
I do re-use my oil. I filter it through cheesecloth into a bottle and store it in the freezer.
 

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Some frying oil temps...<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Unrefined Safflower, canola, sunflower oils 225°<br><br>
Butter 300°<br><br>
Unrefined walnut, corn, soybean, peanut oils 320°<br><br>
Unrefined (cold-extracted) olive oil 320°<br><br>
Vegetable shortening 325°<br><br>
Refined walnut, canola, grapeseed oils 400°<br><br>
Refined olive and light sesame seed oils 410°<br><br>
Cottonseed oil 420°<br><br>
Refined peanut, corn, sunflower and soybean oil 450°<br><br>
Refined safflower oil 510°<br><br>
Avocado oil 520°
 

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Interesting info about oil frying temps... this would be a great thread elsewhere all by itself...<br><br><br><br>
So, I have a couple questions... is the temp listed the smoking point for those oils? And is that the point where oil can develop qualities which are not so good for you?<br><br><br><br>
Also, coconut oil (which I use almost exclusively for frying) wasn't on the list. Do you have any info on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was wondering the same thing myself. <a href="http://missvickie.com/howto/spices/oils.html#What%20Is%20The%20Smoke%20Point" target="_blank">This page</a> appears to be authoritative and covers the subject well.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tofu-N-Sprouts</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br><br><br><br>
So, I have a couple questions... is the temp listed the smoking point for those oils? And is that the point where oil can develop qualities which are not so good for you?<br><br><br><br>
Also, coconut oil (which I use almost exclusively for frying) wasn't on the list. Do you have any info on it?</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I think that is the max temperature you should cook at before the smoke point, but I really don't know the answer to your other questions. My knowledge just kind of cuts off there.<br><br><br><br>
Google away! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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