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Discussion Starter #1
Khichdi (khichadi/khichari) is at is most basic a dish made from rice and dal. The most common dals used are moong dal and masoor dal. It's not to be confused with the Anglo-Indian fish dish, Kedgeree, which is only loosely based on the original. Here's my version of this Indian staple:<br><br><br><br>
A<br><br>
2 Tbsp oil or ghee (I use olive oil)<br><br>
1 Tbsp cumin seeds<br><br>
1 Tbsp mustard seeds<br><br>
1 tsp hing<br><br>
1/2 tsp whole peppercorns<br><br>
2 crushed black cardomom pods<br><br><br><br>
B<br><br>
1 tsp nutmeg<br><br>
1 tsp cinnamon<br><br><br><br>
C<br><br>
2/3 cup red lentils<br><br>
1 and 1/3 cup brown rice *<br><br><br><br>
D<br><br>
4 and 1/2 cups water<br><br>
1 tsp turmeric<br><br>
1 tsp cayenne<br><br><br><br>
Sauté A in a large pot until mustard seeds just begin to pop. Add B and stir vigorously for about 10 seconds or so. Add C. Stir for about 20 seconds, coating the rice and dal well with the oil and spices. Add D, stir well, bring to a boil, then turn down to a simmer. Cover and cook for 40 minutes.<br><br><br><br>
* you can use regular white rice or basmati, but reduce the cooking time from 40 min to 20-25.<br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/2/2f/2f150d57_vbattach4605.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/2/2f/525x525px-LL-2f150d57_vbattach4605.jpeg" style="width:460px;height:341px;"></a><br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/e/ed/edf147ba_vbattach4606.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/e/ed/525x525px-LL-edf147ba_vbattach4606.jpeg" style="width:460px;height:341px;"></a><br><a href="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/6/67/67e0c0f1_vbattach4607.jpeg"><img alt="LL" src="http://cdn.veggieboards.com/6/67/525x525px-LL-67e0c0f1_vbattach4607.jpeg" style="width:460px;height:341px;"></a>
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Tess,<br><br><br><br>
Here's a link for <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asafoetida" target="_blank">Hing</a>. It's pretty stinky stuff, but I love it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">!
 

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Ah, OK. I recognize the name Asafoetida-- I see it pretty often in Indian recipes. But I have to admit I'm kind of scared. When Indian recipes call for it, is it really critical to the dish, or could I skip it?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Many Jains and a few Hindus abstain from garlic and onions. Hing is a replacement for that pungent flavor. It has subtle taste that has a hint of garlic and onion, but it's still different. You can always replace it with garlic or onions. It would be like replacing a recipe with shallots with chives. You're in the same ballpark, but it's not quite the same.
 

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I like the smell of hing! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/chef.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":chef:"><br><br><br><br><span style="font-size:xx-small;">And it tastes great, too<br><br></span>
 
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