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Quote:
Originally Posted by poppyseed View Post

Its a fallacy that leather is a byproduct of cows/bulls. Most leather is sourced from India. See Earthlings.
It's a fallacy that it is not. Leather is a big part of the meat industry. India is currently becoming a leading leather exporter, because leather is in such demand. This does not diminish the fact that the skin of dead cows, outside of India, is not made into leather.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidneylust View Post

but leather and gelatin and stuff like that is used by the parts of animals that would just be discarded, not like the animal dies just to make leather or gelatin, is what the meat factories would throw away, so isn't wearing leather and eating gelatin actually doing something good for the animal, as is a way of saying its life wasn't totally wasted?
Throwing things away costs money. Selling things make money. So in a capitalistic society, most companies would prefer to sell their 'garbage' rather than pay to dispose of it (part of the reason for crap additives in food but that's another thread).

So the meat industry makes money off the leather, gelatin, etc.

There are places called 'rendering plants'. This is where the left over pieces of slaughtered animals and carcasses from dead animals (road kill, euthanized animals, etc) go to be 'processed'. They're processed in large vats of hot water and other chemicals. Fat rises to the top, gelatin below that, etc all the way to the bottom where the heavier proteins and solid matter goes. Fat is then sold to say cosmetics and soap manufactures, gelatin to places that use gelatin, and the heavier proteins and solid matter for things like animal feed. And that animal feed includes pet foods, but it also includes animals used for food (cows, pigs, chickens, etc). This is why there have been laws lately trying to limit the feeding of ruminants to ruminants (to help stop mad cow disease).
 

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I stand corrected. Having seen Earthlings I remember hunky Joaquin stating that 90% of leather thats goes to the western world is from India.
 

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I also think that a lot of the leather comes from different animals than the ones killed for meat. That's why I don't want to buy anything with leather in it anymore because it actually leads to the death of a different animal, not one who would have died to feed the meat-eaters anyway. I don't know about Earthlings but I've read that cows killed for leather need to be skinned and cut up in a different way than those killed for meat (to preserve the skin). I don't remember where I read this though so I can't vouch for its authenticity, but I'm going to err on the side of caution.
 

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As troub mentioned, "humane" laws are mainly intended to protect companion animals, not livestock. There are other laws that "protect" livestock, but they are seldom enforced and not very "humane" to begin with. What's worse is that "poultry" is excluded, so you can treat and kill fowl in any way you desire according to federal law
And I agree with what many others have said, intentionally buying by-products such as gelatin and leather does give the big corporations more $ for exploiting and killing animals. Though I can't avoid everything (like components of computers, cars, etc that have animal products in them), it is simple enough to avoid gelatin and leather in most cases.

Even the welder you mention could most likely buy some "pleather" shoes and his employer would be none the wiser!

Leather makes up a large % of the profit from "by-products," so I no longer buy leather. (I do still have some leather shoes from my pre-vegan days, but I've not been able to make myself wear them in quite some time. I think I'm just going to give them to the Salvation Army soon.) As far as wool, here's another link (also mentions leather) that explains--no graphic pictures (as I don't want to see nightmarish pics either)--why it's inhumane: http://www.impactpress.com/articles/...moore2304.html
 

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Here is a thread I made recently with some resources about the wool industry. There is no graphic content on the direct links I provided.

Good luck with your transition.
I know it may seem a little difficult and overwhelming at first, with having to look differently at everyday objects and clothing we are so accustomed to using. Don't worry - everyone moves at their own pace and discovers their own path to veganism. Enjoy this learning experience.


http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...ad.php?t=66654
 

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fur is the ugliest thing ever. think about it and look at it as a visitor to this planet. its gross. i really like to make rude comments to people and make people feel awkward if i walk past someone who is wearing fur. faux or not. i think the style itself is dead. get it. a play on words. lol
 

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I didn't read the whole thread, but the deal with leather is that is it a huge industry in and of itself. It is NOT a byproduct. It's not a matter of the slaughterhouse folk being like 'well gee, what can we do with all this stuff, 'cause we sure as heck wouldn't want to waste anything'.

Just look at a couch, then at a burger. How many cows for each? In some way, it could almost be more accurate to say that meat would be a byproduct of the leather industry.

Not to say anything about the vile environmental problems with a 'natural' product like leather.
 

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http://animalliberationfront.com/Pra...ishHuntFAQ.htm

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#62 Anything wrong with wool, silk, down?

What's wrong with wool? Scientists over the years have bred a Merino sheep which is exaggeratedly wrinkled. The more wrinkles, the more wool. Unfortunately, greater profits are rarely in the sheep's best interests. In Australia, more wrinkles mean more perspiration and greater susceptibility to fly-strike, a ghastly condition resulting from maggot infestation in the sweaty folds of the sheep's over-wrinkled skin. To counteract this, farmers perform an operation without anesthetic called "mulesing", in which sections of flesh around the anus are sliced away, leaving a painful, bloody wound.

Without human interference, sheep would grow just enough wool to protect them from the weather, but scientific breeding techniques have ensured that these animals have become wool-producing monstrosities.

Their unnatural overload of wool (often half their body weight) brings added misery during summer months when they often die from heat exhaustion. Also, one million sheep die in Australia alone each year from exposure to cold after shearing.

Every year, in Australia alone, about ten million lambs die before they are more than a few days old. This is due largely to unmanageable numbers of sheep and inadequate stockpersons.

Of UK wool, 27 percent is "skin wool", pulled from the skins of slaughtered sheep and lambs.

What's wrong with silk? It is the practice to boil the cocoons that still contain the living moth larvae in order to obtain the silk. This produces longer silk threads than if the moth was allowed to emerge. The silkworm can certainly feel pain and will recoil and writhe when injured.

What's wrong with down? The process of live-plucking is widespread. The terrified birds are lifted by their necks, with their legs tied, and then have all their body feathers ripped out. The struggling geese sustain injuries and after their ordeal are thrown back to join their fellow victims until their turn comes round again. This torture, which has been described as "extremely cruel" by veterinary surgeons, and even geese breeders, begins when the geese are only eight weeks old. It is then repeated at eight-week intervals for two or three more sessions. The birds are then slaughtered.

The "lucky" birds are plucked dead, i.e., they are killed first and then plucked. --MT
Quote:
#60 What is wrong with leather and how can we do without it?

Most leather goods are made from the byproducts of the slaughterhouse, and some is purpose-made, i.e., the animal is grown and slaughtered purely for its skin. So, by buying leather products, you will be contributing to the profits of these establishments and augmenting the economic demand for slaughter.

The Nov/Dec 1991 issue of the Vegetarian Journal has this to say about leather: "Environmentally turning animal hides into leather is an energy intensive and polluting practice. Production of leather basically involves soaking (beamhouse), tanning, dyeing, drying, and finishing. Over 95 percent of all leather produced in the U.S. is chrome-tanned. The effluent that must be treated is primarily related to the beamhouse and tanning operations. The most difficult to treat is effluent from the tanning process. All wastes containing chromium are considered hazardous by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Many other pollutants involved in the processing of leather are associated with environmental and health risks. In terms of disposal, one would think that leather products would be biodegradable, but the primary function for a tanning agent is to stabilize the collagen or protein fibers so that they are no longer biodegradable." --MT

For alternatives to leather, consult the excellent Leather Alternatives FAQ maintained by Tom Swiss
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by troub View Post

as you can see, heh.

someone will freak out at someone else wearing leather. But yet still support the slaughterhouse industry for their pets. >.>

I wonder if the dog can then wear leather? Could one just buy the leather for the dog, and borrow it for cold nights?
Oh, low and behold the lines that some Vegans will draw! Supporting any product with animals in it is wrong. To say that you are a vegan, yet support the killing of animals for your pets also bothers me.

Troub, I back you on this one. I simply do not get how one can be so against an industry, yet support it just as much!
 
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