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Discussion Starter #1
I know we've all seen recipes where you're only supposed to mix the ingredients until "just mixed" so as to preserve the leavening agents (like in muffins, biscuits and pancakes, etc), but what I've always wondered is what exactly does "just mixed" mean? Does that mean that there should be no unmixed flour mixture, that all wet ingredients are to be absorbed? Even though the mixture is still lumpy and maybe not thoroughly mixed all the way through?<br><br><br><br>
I know this probably sounds silly, but I've always wondered if maybe I'm mixing my stuff beyond "just mixed" simply because I don't want barely mixed lumps in my batter. I certainly don't overmix, but I was just wondering what you guys consider "just mixed."
 

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in the case of pancakes, you DO want the batter to remain lumpy. you won't find any of the lumps in the pancakes once cooked.<br><br><br><br>
as soon as baking soda/baking powder come in contact with liquid, the chemical reaction releases all the gas which forms bubbles and then pops and dissipates. you want that to happen while the quickbreads are cooking because it if happens <i>before</i> they are cooked, you'll end up with something "flatter than a pancake". <---- i made a punny joke!
 

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I never understood the term "gently fold in" (I was way too gentle with it) then I watched someone do it on a cooking show and they were quite aggressive.<br><br>
I think I tend to mix a little too much, as well...for some reason, it's hard to stop!
 

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For me, I think it's just me being anal: MUST GET RID OF LUMPS! MUST BE SMOOTH! Thanks, Kreeli. I actually do well with pancakes. It's more with stuff like cornbread that frustrates me. I look at the bowl and I see some cornmeal and flour that are still sticking to the sides of the bowl, so it's like, "Do I stir that stuff in or will doing that give me flat cornbread?"
 

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Ok, this is perhaps a dumb question.... but is it possible to actually overmix something? I mean for pancake batter or gravy or whatever... wouldn't mixing it to a nice consitency provide for the best results every time?
 

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i know pancakes have to still be lumpy for the baking powder to work properly. but what about cake? when i baked my roommate's birthday cake, i mixed it really well, and about halfway through baking i checked on it and there were a couple of big air bubbles forming on the top. one was pretty big so i popped it but tried not to disturb the cake otherwise. it tasted fine but wasn't as fluffy as i'd expected. did i do something wrong in mixing it, or is it because i didn't have an electric beater or whatever.<br><br><br><br>
never made cornbread so i can't help you there, but the restaurant my bf used to work at had the bestest cornbread i've ever had, we were supposed to buy a tub of batter off them and never got around to it. probably not vegan anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Robert</i><br><br><b>Ok, this is perhaps a dumb question.... but is it possible to actually overmix something? I mean for pancake batter or gravy or whatever... wouldn't mixing it to a nice consitency provide for the best results every time?</b></div>
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Yep, it's possible. With vegan recipes, you don't want to kill the leavening agents by overmixing. See, when you "just mix" you preserve some of the leavening. Just like Kreeli described, there's a chemical reaction with the baking soda. So, if you mix, mix, mix, all of the gases created will release and that will deflate and leave you with flat, thick bread, which is no good if you're wanting light and fluffy bread.<br><br><br><br>
Just for baked goods, though.
 

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Ahhh, ok... understood. Perhaps that's the reason then whenever we make pancakes here they are thin, flat and not "airy/sponge-like" at all. I always thought it was just the way veg* pancakes were supposed to be and, quite honestly, was disappointed in how they kept turning out.<br><br><br><br>
I never once for a minute figured it might have somethng to do with the actual mixing step.
 

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i made vegan pancakes a couple of times recently and they turned out amazing and very fluffy indeed. i made a batch of chocolate chip pancakes and one of cinnamon pancakes. both yummy, plus the original recipe of course.<br><br>
but if they ever turn out flat now i'll know why <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 
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