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I was a vegetarian for a year, from November 2005- November 2006. While I hate meat, and feel horrible for eating animals, my diet just wasn't working. I received opposition from my doctors (though, my health is the same as when I was veg) and especially my parents. I felt like a total social inconvenience all the time. I have a gluten intolerance and I really hate dairy products, so when we went out to eat or to a friends house there would be nothing to eat. I definately can see my mom's point of view. I already had a limited diet and was inconveniencing our family when we went to a restaurant (although I really tried not to... I said we could go wherever and I 'd get a salad and bring beans). It got pretty expensive, and for some reason my mom has this idea that people need tons of protein- I know that humans need some, but not huge quantities. My diet was causing major family issues and was not working. Anyway, for the past few months I've been eating white meat. While my family is thrilled, I am definately less than thrilled. I decided that I want to eat vegetarian most of the time for now ( I will eat meat, only when I would be burdening my family to do otherwise), but at home when I have time to cook I am going to try to eat meatless. I will not be a vegetarian, but will at least be doing what I can for now. Have any of you been vegetarians on already restricted diets such as a gluten free diet? What kinds of foods did you eat? How did you cope?<br><br>
Thank you so much!
 

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Here is an online vegan gluten-free cookbook that might give you some ideas: <a href="http://www.vitalita.com/cookbooks.html" target="_blank">http://www.vitalita.com/cookbooks.html</a><br><br><br><br>
If you're concerned about animal cruelty via the meat you are choosing to eat, perhaps you should consider consuming red meat instead of white meat. One cow feeds a lot more people than one chicken, so the number of animals who are killed for you would be reduced if you ate red meat instead.
 

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<a href="http://www.fatfreevegan.com/gluten-free/index.shtml" target="_blank">http://www.fatfreevegan.com/gluten-free/index.shtml</a><br><br>
theres a bunch of vegan gluten free stuff
 
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i'm gluten free too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
you can do it, and its not that hard, if you research it, plan ahead, find alternatives and recipes, and most importantly, learn to cook- at least to a basic level.<br><br><br><br>
i make extra meals when i cook, and freeze some, so that i have a constant source of assorted 'ready meals' to take with me if i have to eat at other peoples houses, and i've learned to get inventive with what i have for breakfast and packed lunches.<br><br><br><br>
eating out as a gluten free veg*n isn't going to be a culinary delight, unless you know of some specialist restaurants or places that'll let you special order- but if you think about it logically, and check menus online, you can make it work- though i think that indian places would be better set up to deal with your needs than say... burger king.. you know? i don't eat out much anyway though- i can make nicer things at home and know they won't make me sick, lol.<br><br><br><br>
anway, first, i'd recommend getting a copy of a book called 'the food allergy survival guide' (either buying it or borrowing it from a library) you can see it at <a href="http://www.foodallergysurvivalguide.com/" target="_blank">http://www.foodallergysurvivalguide.com/</a> for more info. all the recipes in it are vegan and gluten free- its got reciepes for things like pizza and pancakes and flatbreads and cookies and breads and cornbread and cakes and all kinds of other yummy stuff, as well as information on nutrition, eating out, etc.<br><br><br><br>
second, i'd start looking at what you <i>can</i> eat. write a huge list and pin it up in the kitchen. and look for alternative foods and products that you <i>can</i> use, like Tinkiyada gluten free rice pasta (which is soooo good and miraculously not mushy!) and Food for Life brown rice tortillas (great for making wraps)- make a list of them too, and find out where you can get them near you. even some boxed frozen meals are gluten free- some of the Amy's brand are, for a start- incase you need something quick to take somewhere with you- look on their website for a list of whats ok for you.<br><br><br><br>
it takes a bit of work, but it's do-able.... to give you an example:<br><br><br><br>
i eat vegan, and don't have wheat, gluten, yeast, sugar, msg, and a few other things either. so far today i've had a big slab of g/f tomato, kale and sunflowerseed pesto, broccolli, caramelised onion, corn, and vegan cheese pizza for breakfast (i know, i know, ... pizza for breakfast... lol) and some spicy tomato and 6 bean soup, with soya milk, and corn bread, for lunch. i'll probably have curry and rice, or a stirfry with cashews and rice noodles for dinner.<br><br><br><br>
there are loaaads of vegan and gluten free things to eat on the planet, you just gotta find em, and learn to work with them!<br><br><br><br>
i could probably write you a list of whats in my cupboards, fridge, and freezer, if that'd help, lol? it'd be long though- i LIKE food, lol.
 

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Hi folks. So I am not gluten free, but my grandmother has pretty severe gluten intolerance, and I'd love to be able to help her. Being almost 70, she is not all that adept at researching things on the internet, or putting the effort into figuring it out otherwise. So she tends to eat nothing but some veggies and a really crummy rice bread. Obviously, NOT healthy. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":sick:"><br><br><br><br>
So what are some breads, and pastas, and other things that she CAN have? (if you know) Hoodedclawjen, that list would be useful to me, if you wouldn't mind all the effort...<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Thank you! (in advance)
 

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Hi! I'm new here and so glad to see I'm not the only one struggling w/ the wheat thing. I've been avoiding wheat (and some of those other pesky grains) for almost a year. I've nervous to try and go veg with all the restrictions, but hopefully we can help each other through it!
 
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ok, pasta: hands down, tinkyada rice pasta wins. <a href="http://www.tinkyada.com/" target="_blank">http://www.tinkyada.com/</a> they have loads of different pastas (even cute little rocketships and dinosaur shapes!!!), and they don't turn to mush or taste like gravel. i'm in Ontario, but i've seen them in a small town Sobeys in deepest NewBrunswick, so i bet they have them in Nova Scotia too <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> . there is loads you can do with pasta- salads, spag bol, etc... and they have lasagna sheets too, so yey... lasagne!<br><br><br><br>
there are a suprising amount of gluten free cookies and crackers about, as well as baking powders, stocks, etc. health food stores, bulk food stores, ethnic stores, and big grocery stores always seem to have a few cool things, from what i've seen. right now i have ricecakes (blergh) as well as hotkid rice crackers <a href="https://findersfinefoods.com/products/product.asp?warehouse=00&partnumber=5350731" target="_blank">https://findersfinefoods.com/product...number=5350731</a> (site is to see what they look like) and some holgrain crackers (not sure how i feel about them yet, cos i've only just tried them, but they seem alright) <a href="http://www.holgrain.com/cgi-local/SoftCart.exe/online-store/scstore/wheatfree.html?L+scstore+lqtg0868+1197687112" target="_blank">http://www.holgrain.com/cgi-local/So...868+1197687112</a> .<br><br><br><br>
corn chips are also pretty good and ''cracker-esque' if you ask me. also, Glutino seems to do a lot of yummy looking crackers and cookies and the like, which you could probably find in stores, or order as a special treat for your gran online from places like <a href="http://www.glutenfree.com" target="_blank">http://www.glutenfree.com</a> . g/f premade stuff (like cookies) tends to be really expensive, so i'd make it myself, or just use it as a treat, unless money was no object. also, bear in mind that i don't eat sugar, yeast, etc, either, and have only been in canada for a year, so i'm not the biggest expert on 'stuff in packets' over here, lol.<br><br><br><br>
for general stuff: i found El Peto <a href="http://www.elpeto.com/elpetoproducts.html" target="_blank">http://www.elpeto.com/elpetoproducts.html</a> make loaaaads of really tasty gluten free stuff, including apple spice muffins and proper fruit pies with lush flaky pastry. you can get them frozen in the 'special diet' or 'natural foods' section of bigger grocery stores. i've not tried their bread stuff, but thats cos i stear clear of g/f breads, lol.<br><br><br><br>
why? basically: premade gluten free 'regular' breads (loaves, rolls, etc) always pretty much suck. trust me. they're chewy, rubbery, heavy like a brick, and gacky. they give me hiccups and indigestion, and i'd rather chew on my own foot than eat them, lol. i love those food for life flatbreads (from the frozen section of a big local grocery store) though.<br><br><br><br>
the book i mentioned above has much nicer 'normal bread' recipes- including a lush 'sunny seed bread' that i've made without the seeds, and it was still mighty sunny tasting <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> . the only premade g/f bread/mix i've ever bought thats been ok was an Ogran one <a href="http://www.orgran.com" target="_blank">http://www.orgran.com</a> , and even then, the one from the book i mentioned is nicer, and cheaper, as is fresh homemade cornbread (from the same book).<br><br><br><br>
recipes in that book generally use a mixture of g/f flours, like chickpea flour and rice flour, that you can get really cheap in bulk food stores or more expensively from grocery stores, from brands like bobs red mill <a href="http://www.bobsredmill.com/" target="_blank">http://www.bobsredmill.com/</a> (which they'll also have in Sobeys etc- bobs red mill does stuff like g/f pancake mix too, i believe).<br><br><br><br>
while it might seem like a pain to mix 4 flours together to make something from a g/f recipe, you can do it with a jug instead of a cup, in a big bowl, and keep it in a huge jar, and then you only gotta do it once in every few months and your flour mix is ready to go for making stuff like pancakes, cookies, pies, etc. and if you make a whole bunch of something, like cornbread or pancakes, etc, it takes maybe an hour, and you can freeze meal sized portions and eat it for weeks. thats what i do.<br><br><br><br>
also, on the offchance that your gran is veggie too (you never know!) sol cuisine veggie burgers and falafels are g/f too: <a href="http://www.solcuisine.com/products.html" target="_blank">http://www.solcuisine.com/products.html</a> .<br><br><br><br>
i'd seriously recommend that book, anyway. i don't tend to use much in the way of premade g/f stuff, cos there is so much that is just naturally g/f about that you can work with. like rice ( as asian rice noodles, riceflour, rice flakes for porridge, ricemilk, as well as in mexican or indian or italian savory rice dishes, or sweet in rice pudding ... mmmm ricepudding for breakfast!!!..., etc)... corn (in a can, on the cob, as cornmeal, cornflakes, corn tortillas and tacos, ground for polenta, etc), buckwheat (flour or kasha). also, there are a bajjillion kindsa nuts and beans and pulses you can eat as are, in meals (curries, salads, nutloafs, hummus, etc) or in things, like indian snacks and popadums, as flours, roasted, ground for baking, etc, as well as absolutely loads of different kinds of veggies, and herbs and spices to make meals reminiscent of those from round the world.<br><br><br><br>
seriously, i think we forget that there is so much left to eat- if you start with a potato: there are probably hundreds of things you can do with a potato and another 3 or so ingredients- like potato pancakes, rostis, tater tots, you can have them mashed (garlic, herb, onion, cheezy?), baked, fried, boiled, scalloped, as fries, spicy wedges, hashbrowns, filled crispy potato skins, bubble and squeak, potato scones, garlic and rosemary roasted, dry ginger and garlic crusted indian-style fried, in a creamy potato soup... etc etc etc... lol.<br><br><br><br>
i try and eat lots of different stuff like that, and try lots of new things, like mexican, indian, asian, middle eastern, etc. eating different things, and trying out exotic meals and foods, often means i don't notice i've got no boring old white sliced bread to go with it, lol.<br><br><br><br>
blah blah blah..... i'm hungry now.. gotta go!
 

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Thank you so much! I appreciate that a LOT. No, *sigh* she is not veggie. Funny, though. She eats very little meat, but is quite concerned about my protein... generation gap, perhaps?<br><br><br><br>
Anyway - a couple more questions. You talked about chickpea flour. Is any flour that is not made from a grain ok? (forgive my ignorance here) And can you bake stuff with flours that aren't from grains? Can you just replace the other flour, or do you need an adjusted recipe?
 

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Nookle: You have a really interesting question here. Are grains the only food that contain gluten? I am so tempted to jump right up and say yes, but I am going to see what I can find.
 

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Here's a list that looks useful: <a href="http://www.csaceliacs.org/gluten_grains.php" target="_blank">http://www.csaceliacs.org/gluten_grains.php</a>
 

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Excellent! Thank you froggy - I really appreciate that. I'm somewhat in the dark on exactly what 'celiac' entails.
 
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froggy's list is a good one. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> some grains contain gluten, and others don't. wheat, rye, barley, and oats are the big no go's, and while there is debate over oats and the kind of and amount of gluten in it (some people think its ok), i'd avoid it. also, some wheat intollerant people are ok with spelt (an ancient form of wheat) and some aren't.<br><br><br><br>
on a simple level, gluten is the stuff that makes wheat flour bind and stretch and go gloopy when its gets wet (if you've ever made bread dough you know what i'm talking about). lots of other grains/flours work in place of wheat, but the trick is in replacing that 'gloopy stretchiness' without ending up with something very dense or chewy.<br><br><br><br>
if you want to switch flours in a recipe, you can't just sub chickpea or rice straight in for wheat, in the mostpart, because all flours have very different qualities. chickpea flour is high in protein, excellent in batters, for example, and its got a nice nutty flavour, but its also pretty heavy. with a bit of riceflour it makes a lush pancake, and its great in indian foods.<br><br><br><br>
finely ground rice flour can be very light and neutral/mildly sweet tasting, but its also very dry in texture, so it often works better in stuff like cookies than in batters- make a neat riceflour batter and your pancake will crumble like hell when it cooks.<br><br><br><br>
combining 3 or 4 different non gluten flours in different ratios gives you a combo with the right density, weight, binding properties, etc, to replace flour in different kinds of recipes.<br><br><br><br>
to replace the 'gloop' factor, you can also add powdered xanthan gum or guar gum, but you need to use the right amount, or you end up with a beautiful baked rock. xanthan gum is crazy stuff, if you spill a sprinkle of it on your counter, and get it wet, its like the slipperiest thing known to man, lol.<br><br><br><br>
you can get suggested flour mix ratios for different kinds of recipes, online, or in specialty g/f books. i'd stick with using them in g/f recipes to start with, before you try and sub them in regular ones, though, cos they can change other recipe properties, eg: you might need a little more or less water in a recipe, and thing like g/f cookies can look very different to regular ones when raw, and they need cooking at a lower temperature, for less time, etc, when you sub stuff.<br><br><br><br>
but theoretically, once you've sussed how they work, you can edit and adapt regular recipes to your hearts content. you can also buy premixed blends of g/f flours, which claim to be universally suitable, or which are designed for different things, like 'pancake and waffle batter' or 'sponge cake mix', as well. i think they're a rip-off though- but so is regular batter and pancake mix, lol.
 

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Froggy: Gluten is in wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Those diagnosed with Celiac disease cannot have any of the above. Some people are not Celiac, but have an intolerance to wheat (or perhaps any of the other grains).<br><br><br><br>
My favorite GF products are Kinikinik doughnuts (to DIE for), Nature's Path Honey'd Corn Flakes, and Almond Breeze Original Almond Milk. I also eat Annie's Rice Noodle Bowls, Tamari (wheat free soy sauce), Larabars, Tortilla Chips, etc. If you aire anywhere near a Whole Foods Market you MUST get yourself some of their Prairie Bread. It is hands down the BEST GF bread I've ever had. YUMM!<br><br><br><br>
If you need any other suggestions let me know!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>EricsGrrl</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Froggy: Gluten is in wheat, rye, barley, <b>and oats.</b> Those diagnosed with Celiac disease cannot have any of the above. Some people are not Celiac, but have an intolerance to wheat (or perhaps any of the other grains).<br><br><br><br>
My favorite GF products are Kinikinik doughnuts (to DIE for), Nature's Path Honey'd Corn Flakes, and Almond Breeze Original Almond Milk. I also eat Annie's Rice Noodle Bowls, Tamari (wheat free soy sauce), Larabars, Tortilla Chips, etc. If you aire anywhere near a Whole Foods Market you MUST get yourself some of their Prairie Bread. It is hands down the BEST GF bread I've ever had. YUMM!<br><br><br><br>
If you need any other suggestions let me know!</div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
ive seen gluten-free oats sold before in places like <i>whole foods</i> and <i>fresh and natural</i>
 
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i just looked these up- seems interesting:<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/" target="_blank">http://www.glutenfreeoats.com/</a><br><br><br><br>
research and debate is still going on in the oats area though (as the site below shows) , so i don't think i'd probably take the risk, personally, if i was a celiac (i'm not, i'm intollerant instead- and i still don't take the risk). oats aren't that great anyway,- and you can use things like millet and rice flakes in place of them.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://www.celiac.com/st_main.html?p_catid=14" target="_blank">http://www.celiac.com/st_main.html?p_catid=14</a>
 
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