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Hey guys...

I was just wondering if any of you had chickens in your bak yard..

Would you eat there eggs???

Just wondering what peoples thoughts were on that???
 

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I wouldn't, because the fact of the matter is that not everyone can have chickens in their back yard. By eating eggs at all, you would be endorsing the demand for eggs that led to the terrible cruelty that chickens are subject to.
 

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um im a vegge so i eat eggs but i think i would much preffer that it was from my own clean chicken in my own clean back yard!
 

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We've had a lot of threads on this..

Personally, I'm in the transition to vegan. Once I make it totally there, I wouldn't eat my pets' periods. So, no.
 

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Having went through the transition from Vegan to Pescetarian and back to Vegan... No... They made me gag unless totally masked, and the pure thought - like animallover said - of eating another creatures period is nasty.
 

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considering eggs are super unhealthly for you no. most dont know that denatured protein is unuseable to the human body. and when you cook a egg it denatures, thats why it "gels" up.
 

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No, I would give them to my mother, stop her from buying factory farmed eggs.
 

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If straight personal ethics is your only concern, without regard to the other aspects and results of your choices, than I could see one justifying eating "backyard" eggs.

But that person might as well be freegan and eat roadkill, or bigmac's out of the trash.
 

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I believe there CAN be ethically produced eggs that I could get from chickens I kept, but that is would be much more complicated than just having my own hens (things like buying unsexed birds, making sure I wasn't supporting cruelty in their breeding, etc. Possibly keeping rescued hens). If I had chickens already I would eat their eggs, but OTOH I think that making sure I had ethically produced eggs is far more effort than avoiding eggs, so I would probably not bother unless I really thought it would be benificial to my health or my life to eat eggs again.
 

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Oh yay! A thread about "ethical eggs"!


Let's do honey next!

 

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HAHA! Oh, jeez... Jen... I am not sure why I found that so funny... Anyway, off to suck down my ethically-safe Agave nectar.
 

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yes

I am vegetarian and I eat eggs

there is nothing wrong with them if the chicken is grain fed, healthy, and lived a normal life I think
 

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I have chickens & yes I eat their eggs, the dogs/cats eat them, or I give them to my egg-eating relatives who would otherwise be buying store eggs. Some of my chickens are rescues; they lead very happy, healthy lives. In return, they leave me about a dozen beautiful eggs every 4 days.
 

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Quote:
most dont know that denatured protein is unuseable to the human body
How so? Denaturation alters the tertiary and secondary structure of a protein by breaking bonds between amino acid side chains. The primary structure, i.e. the amino acids and the peptide bonds remain intact. The proteases in your digestive system will still cleave the peptide bonds. Besides, stomach acid denatures proteins too.

Sorry for the off topic...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucine View Post

yes

I am vegetarian and I eat eggs

there is nothing wrong with them if the chicken is grain fed, healthy, and lived a normal life I think
It is almost a sure bet that unless you raised the hens yourself from birth, the hens who supplied the eggs you buy:

- had their male brothers gassed, suffocated, or ground up right after they were born,

- will die a gruesome death in the slaugterhouse before they reach their second birthday.

Modern hens are bred to lay up to ten times more eggs than they have evolved to do over millenia; among other things, this robs their bodies of calcium and other minerals and increases the chances of excrutiatingly painful prolapses and other complications, which almost certainly are not treated by any veterinarian, not even for pain relief.

That's just the start - but that should be enough. Why are we so intent on getting something from animals' bodies? Isn't it enough to appreciate them, to do our part to ensure that they're able to live as nature designed them to do, and - if we're so fortunate - to be friends with them?
 

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Originally Posted by SuperChicken View Post

Some of my chickens are rescues; they lead very happy, healthy lives. In return, they leave me about a dozen beautiful eggs every 4 days.
Do know that the hens are laying such a high volume of eggs because of decades of intensive industry-funded breeding; basically the hens can't help it; if they were raised in the most horrid battery cage conditions their output would be nearly as high. They're not laying the eggs for you or in return for anything you've done.

In the wild, hens lay perhaps 24 eggs a year; their bodies can handle that volume. In some cases, they eat unfertilized eggs as a way to regain minerals and nutrients lost through the laying process.

That's good that some of your chickens are rescues; that's about the most humane way to obtain eggs - if one is intent on obtaining eggs. The other hens probably came from a hatchery where they routinely kill newborn male chicks and where the female chicks grow up without a mother.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegzilla View Post

Do know that the hens are laying such a high volume of eggs because of decades of intensive industry-funded breeding; basically the hens can't help it; if they were raised in the most horrid battery cage conditions their output would be nearly as high. They're not laying the eggs for you or in return for anything you've done.

In the wild, hens lay perhaps 24 eggs a year; their bodies can handle that volume. In some cases, they eat unfertilized eggs as a way to regain minerals and nutrients lost through the laying process.

That's good that some of your chickens are rescues; that's about the most humane way to obtain eggs - if one is intent on obtaining eggs. The other hens probably came from a hatchery where they routinely kill newborn male chicks and where the female chicks grow up without a mother.
Yes, I do know why my hens are "layers". I do not encourage them to lay by fiddling with lights or anything of the sort. In fact, they take all winter off each year and don't lay a single one. I know that they are not deliberately leaving me gifts of eggs, it was a figure of speech.

The non-rescues did come from a hatchery before I was veg, and before I knew better. I would never purchase chickens again from anywhere. However, now that they are here, and they live like queens, there is no sense in wasting their eggs (IMO). I assure you the hens have zero interest in them.

If one wanted to keep chickens as companion animals though, there are MANY available for rescue, and I don't see anything wrong with using their eggs if one wanted to, and if one took proper care of the hens. The (unfertilized) eggs are going to come anyway & what's the sense of throwing them out? That doesn't help the chickens or Earth any.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snow White View Post

How so? Denaturation alters the tertiary and secondary structure of a protein by breaking bonds between amino acid side chains. The primary structure, i.e. the amino acids and the peptide bonds remain intact. The proteases in your digestive system will still cleave the peptide bonds. Besides, stomach acid denatures proteins too.

Sorry for the off topic...
not sure exactly, its what my nutrition book said.
 
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