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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm loving this lifestyle...really, I am. I love that I'm not supporting the meat industry anymore or hurting the animals. It's just sometimes it can get extremely frustrating <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/mad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":mad:">. I have tons of recipes printed out that I would love to try, but the majority of the ingredients: I have never heard of or I have to drive 50 miles to get. The little grocery store in my town doesn't have any fresh spinach, kale, collard greens, or eggplant (that's only naming a few). I'll just have to stick it out for a few more years, until I get enough money saved up so that I can move away from here <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br>
I also don't know a single vegetarian, or vegan for that matter. I have an inkling that no one in this town even knows what a vegan is, they may have an idea about a vegetarian though. And I'm a pretty shy person, and talking is somewhat difficult, especially to people that I don't really know <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/shy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":shy:"><br><br>
I'm trying my best and that's really all I can do, and I'm managing pretty well <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">. Alright, my little rant's over.....carry on <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/pimp.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":tame:">
 

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Have you tried social networking sites like meetup.com? I'll bet you can find a vegetarian group close to where you live if you really want to.
 

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I don't really eat eggplant and spinach either. Focus on covering all the veg food groups, and prepare familiar foods the way you like them with a few substitutions.<br><br>
Right now, Walmart.com and Amazon.com are duking it out over the groceries-by-mail thing. Amazon.com isn't hanging onto your items as long if you choose free super saver shipping, and Walmart has added a lot of groceries online with either free or .97 cent shipping.<br><br>
Amazon.com and Walmart.com each have their pros and cons. Amazon requires a $25 purchase for free shipping, Walmart doesn't have that restriction. Amazon generally sells foodstuffs in bulk.<br><br>
I compare prices online to prices locally, and then buy the better deal.<br><br>
Shopping online won't help get you varied fresh produce. Try to find a farmer's market. Farmer's Markets can surprise you!<br><br>
If getting your hands on a variety of vegetables for use in recipes can be a problem for you, try <a href="http://www.harmonyhousefoods.com" target="_blank">www.harmonyhousefoods.com</a> Most of the dehydrated vegetables rehydrate and cook up like fresh. They won't taste like raw, but if you're making a casserole, lasagna, sauce, soup, bean burgers, etc... These dried veggies work great! I use them weekly in my cooking, especially for last minute recipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Josh James xVx</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2924894"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Have you tried social networking sites like meetup.com? I'll bet you can find a vegetarian group close to where you live if you really want to.</div>
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That's a wonderful suggestion and I've actually looked at that site out of curiosity. The closest meetup to me is 3.5 hours away <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":(">. A bit far for my liking, but it'd be nice.<br><br>
I'm not sure how to do multiple quotes so this is in reply to Hazelnut:<br><br>
As for doing shopping online, I've thought about it just never actually done it. I think it's about time to start <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">. Also, I've never thought about re-hydrating my veggies. That's a fantastic idea, thanks so much <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">. I've never been much of a cook so I'm new to that as well, but I'm learning as I go. I actually like trying new recipes; I'm just having problems finding ingredients. I think I'll definitely look into online grocery shopping <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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The great thing about dehydrated veggies is they have a long shelf life. I prefer fresh of course, but realistically I just don't use stuff up fast enough. And living in Minnesota fresh isn't always much of an option (I prefer buying local produce - it tastes better and keeps more of my money in my community).<br><br>
If making the most of pantry items sounds appealing take a look at Jon and Robin Robertson's <i>Vegan Unplugged</i> (former title <i>Apocalypse Chow</i>). Recipes designed for using in disaster situations when fresh produce (among other things) may be hard to come by.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>LacyLou</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2924982"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I'm not sure how to do multiple quotes so this is in reply to Hazelnut:<br><br>
As for doing shopping online, I've thought about it just never actually done it. I think it's about time to start <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">. Also, I've never thought about re-hydrating my veggies. That's a fantastic idea, thanks so much <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D">. I've never been much of a cook so I'm new to that as well, but I'm learning as I go. I actually like trying new recipes; I'm just having problems finding ingredients. I think I'll definitely look into online grocery shopping <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"></div>
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I do multiple quotes by right clicking on the reply-with-quote button, and selecting "Open in new Tab" repeatedly, depending on how many quotes I want. Then, delete non-relevant information from the text.<br><br>
Then, Copy the quoted text, and paste it in the field beneath another quoted text.<br><br>
ONLINE SHOPPING TIPs:<br>
Amazon.com will give free shipping for orders over $25, but you MUST choose the free super-saver shipping during your checkout process.<br><br>
Always mentally add in the shipping costs if there are any when anticipating your cost.<br><br>
Use a calculator, and divide up costs per each, ounces, or pounds.<br><br>
For example... (this is why we did word problems in school...they save you money)<br><br>
(If you hated those word problems, or otherwise hate math in all its forms, then please do not read any further. Your head will explode.)<br><br>
I can buy Anasazi beans for about $5 per pound.<br><br>
Amazon.com sells a four pack of 27 ounce bags for $22.71.<br><br>
27 * 4 = That is 108 ounces.<br><br>
16 ounces is a pound, so we're talking about 6.75 pounds because 108 / 16 = 6.75.<br><br>
So, we take that $22.71 and divide it by 6.75, and find that it equals out to 3.364444, or <b>$3.37 per pound.</b><br><br>
Obviously, if I use these beans a lot (and I will) I should order them from Amazon.com.<br>
I looked at other websites, other listings on Amazon, and even eBay, and found the going rate to be about $6-$12 per pound. So, Amazon.com is a real bargain. If I used thier subscribe and save option, then it would be <b>$2.86 per pound.</b><br><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Dave in MPLS</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2925017"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
If making the most of pantry items sounds appealing take a look at Jon and Robin Robertson's <i>Vegan Unplugged</i> (former title <i>Apocalypse Chow</i>). Recipes designed for using in disaster situations when fresh produce (among other things) may be hard to come by.</div>
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I looked at both of those books. They really look like two different books. Are they really the same thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice, I will look into that. I really like the idea of re-hydrating veggies, especially for the shelf life. That didn't really cross my mind to be honest <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/dunce.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":dunce:"><br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Hazelnut</strong> <a href="/forum/post/2925047"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I looked at both of those books. They really look like two different books. Are they really the same thing?</div>
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I looked both of them up on Amazon and they do seem very similar to me. Both seem to be a helpful guide to surviving disasters or just making the most of what you have in tight situations. A reviewer also mentioned they were the same book, just that <i>Apocalypse Chow</i> went out of print and they re-issued it as <i>Vegan Unplugged</i>.
 
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