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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm loving this lifestyle...really, I am. I love that I'm not supporting the meat industry anymore or hurting the animals. It's just sometimes it can get extremely frustrating
. I have tons of recipes printed out that I would love to try, but the majority of the ingredients: I have never heard of or I have to drive 50 miles to get. The little grocery store in my town doesn't have any fresh spinach, kale, collard greens, or eggplant (that's only naming a few). I'll just have to stick it out for a few more years, until I get enough money saved up so that I can move away from here


I also don't know a single vegetarian, or vegan for that matter. I have an inkling that no one in this town even knows what a vegan is, they may have an idea about a vegetarian though. And I'm a pretty shy person, and talking is somewhat difficult, especially to people that I don't really know


I'm trying my best and that's really all I can do, and I'm managing pretty well
. Alright, my little rant's over.....carry on
 

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I don't really eat eggplant and spinach either. Focus on covering all the veg food groups, and prepare familiar foods the way you like them with a few substitutions.

Right now, Walmart.com and Amazon.com are duking it out over the groceries-by-mail thing. Amazon.com isn't hanging onto your items as long if you choose free super saver shipping, and Walmart has added a lot of groceries online with either free or .97 cent shipping.

Amazon.com and Walmart.com each have their pros and cons. Amazon requires a $25 purchase for free shipping, Walmart doesn't have that restriction. Amazon generally sells foodstuffs in bulk.

I compare prices online to prices locally, and then buy the better deal.

Shopping online won't help get you varied fresh produce. Try to find a farmer's market. Farmer's Markets can surprise you!

If getting your hands on a variety of vegetables for use in recipes can be a problem for you, try www.harmonyhousefoods.com Most of the dehydrated vegetables rehydrate and cook up like fresh. They won't taste like raw, but if you're making a casserole, lasagna, sauce, soup, bean burgers, etc... These dried veggies work great! I use them weekly in my cooking, especially for last minute recipes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh James xVx View Post

Have you tried social networking sites like meetup.com? I'll bet you can find a vegetarian group close to where you live if you really want to.
That's a wonderful suggestion and I've actually looked at that site out of curiosity. The closest meetup to me is 3.5 hours away
. A bit far for my liking, but it'd be nice.

I'm not sure how to do multiple quotes so this is in reply to Hazelnut:

As for doing shopping online, I've thought about it just never actually done it. I think it's about time to start
. Also, I've never thought about re-hydrating my veggies. That's a fantastic idea, thanks so much
. I've never been much of a cook so I'm new to that as well, but I'm learning as I go. I actually like trying new recipes; I'm just having problems finding ingredients. I think I'll definitely look into online grocery shopping
 

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Riot Nrrrd
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The great thing about dehydrated veggies is they have a long shelf life. I prefer fresh of course, but realistically I just don't use stuff up fast enough. And living in Minnesota fresh isn't always much of an option (I prefer buying local produce - it tastes better and keeps more of my money in my community).

If making the most of pantry items sounds appealing take a look at Jon and Robin Robertson's Vegan Unplugged (former title Apocalypse Chow). Recipes designed for using in disaster situations when fresh produce (among other things) may be hard to come by.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LacyLou View Post

I'm not sure how to do multiple quotes so this is in reply to Hazelnut:

As for doing shopping online, I've thought about it just never actually done it. I think it's about time to start
. Also, I've never thought about re-hydrating my veggies. That's a fantastic idea, thanks so much
. I've never been much of a cook so I'm new to that as well, but I'm learning as I go. I actually like trying new recipes; I'm just having problems finding ingredients. I think I'll definitely look into online grocery shopping
I do multiple quotes by right clicking on the reply-with-quote button, and selecting "Open in new Tab" repeatedly, depending on how many quotes I want. Then, delete non-relevant information from the text.

Then, Copy the quoted text, and paste it in the field beneath another quoted text.

ONLINE SHOPPING TIPs:
Amazon.com will give free shipping for orders over $25, but you MUST choose the free super-saver shipping during your checkout process.

Always mentally add in the shipping costs if there are any when anticipating your cost.

Use a calculator, and divide up costs per each, ounces, or pounds.

For example... (this is why we did word problems in school...they save you money)

(If you hated those word problems, or otherwise hate math in all its forms, then please do not read any further. Your head will explode.)

I can buy Anasazi beans for about $5 per pound.

Amazon.com sells a four pack of 27 ounce bags for $22.71.

27 * 4 = That is 108 ounces.

16 ounces is a pound, so we're talking about 6.75 pounds because 108 / 16 = 6.75.

So, we take that $22.71 and divide it by 6.75, and find that it equals out to 3.364444, or $3.37 per pound.

Obviously, if I use these beans a lot (and I will) I should order them from Amazon.com.
I looked at other websites, other listings on Amazon, and even eBay, and found the going rate to be about $6-$12 per pound. So, Amazon.com is a real bargain. If I used thier subscribe and save option, then it would be $2.86 per pound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in MPLS View Post

If making the most of pantry items sounds appealing take a look at Jon and Robin Robertson's Vegan Unplugged (former title Apocalypse Chow). Recipes designed for using in disaster situations when fresh produce (among other things) may be hard to come by.
I looked at both of those books. They really look like two different books. Are they really the same thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice, I will look into that. I really like the idea of re-hydrating veggies, especially for the shelf life. That didn't really cross my mind to be honest


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazelnut View Post

I looked at both of those books. They really look like two different books. Are they really the same thing?
I looked both of them up on Amazon and they do seem very similar to me. Both seem to be a helpful guide to surviving disasters or just making the most of what you have in tight situations. A reviewer also mentioned they were the same book, just that Apocalypse Chow went out of print and they re-issued it as Vegan Unplugged.
 
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