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I've never done anything but slice it and eat it. Yum.. I <i>love</i> jicama! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> My students squeezed lime juice on it. That's about the only thing exciting I've ever seen done with it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)">
 

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Here are some recipes using jicama (pronounced <i>YEE-kuh-muh</i>, BTW). The recipes are not certified veg*n or anything. Please employ your critical thinking skills to accept, reject, or modify accordingly. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"><br><br><br><br>
* Exported from MasterCook *<br><br><br><br><b>Bean Salad With Chipotle Chile Vinaigrette</b><br><br><br><br>
Recipe By : Cooking Light, October 1994, page 77<br><br>
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:11<br><br>
Categories : Salads<br><br><br><br>
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br><br>
-------- ------------ --------------------------------<br><br>
1 cup diced peeled jicama -- (6 ounces)<br><br>
1 cup seeded diced tomato<br><br>
1 cup diced yellow bell pepper<br><br>
1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions<br><br>
1/2 cup diced carrot<br><br>
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro<br><br>
16 ounces pinto beans -- drained<br><br>
15 ounces black beans -- drained<br><br>
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar<br><br>
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice<br><br>
1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil<br><br>
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano<br><br>
canned chipotle chile in adobo sauce<br><br><br><br>
Combine first 8 ingredients in a large bowl; toss well, and set aside.<br><br><br><br>
Combine sherry vinegar and next 4 ingredients in a blender, and process until smooth. Pour over bean mixture, and toss gently. Cover and chill 2 hours. Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 1 cup).<br><br><br><br>
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* Exported from MasterCook *<br><br><br><br><b>Garden Salad with Creamy Herb Dressing</b><br><br><br><br>
Recipe By : the California Culinary Academy<br><br>
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:20<br><br>
Categories : Low Calorie Salads<br><br>
Low Cholesterol Dairy-Restricted Diets<br><br>
Low Fat<br><br><br><br>
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br><br>
-------- ------------ --------------------------------<br><br>
1 cup jicama -- peeled and julienned<br><br>
1 cup watercress -- chopped<br><br>
3 cups torn red leaf lettuce<br><br>
1/2 cup sliced radishes<br><br>
2 tablespoons lime juice<br><br>
1/4 cup tarragon vinegar<br><br>
1 tablespoon honey*<br><br>
1/2 cup soft tofu<br><br>
1 teaspoon olive oil<br><br>
1 teaspoon low-sodium soy or tamari sauce<br><br>
1 tablespoon stone-ground mustard<br><br>
2 teaspoons minced parsley<br><br>
1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme<br><br>
1/2 teaspoon minced fresh basil<br><br><br><br>
1. In a large salad bowl, toss together jicama, watercress, lettuce, and radishes.<br><br><br><br>
2. In a blender puree lime juice, vinegar, honey, tofu, oil, and soy sauce until creamy. Stir in mustard, parsley, thyme, and basil, and pour over salad. Toss well and serve.<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
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NOTES : The secret of this delicious salad is the creamy dressing liberally laced with fresh herbs. Soft tofu is pureed to create the texture of this dairy-free dressing. You can use whatever vegetables are fresh and in season-experiment with blanched snow peas, summer squash, and whole cherry tomatoes in addition to the ingredients listed below.<br><br><br><br>
*NOTE: There are a number of vegan substitutes for honey, like brown rice syrup.
 

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* Exported from MasterCook *<br><br><br><br><b>Jicama-Orange Salad</b><br><br><br><br>
Recipe By : Cooking Light, Jul/Aug 1995, page 70<br><br>
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:15<br><br>
Categories : Salads<br><br><br><br>
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br><br>
-------- ------------ --------------------------------<br><br>
1 jicama -- (1-1/2-pound)<br><br>
3 cups orange sections -- (9 oranges)<br><br>
1/4 teaspoon salt<br><br>
1 Dash chili powder<br><br>
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro<br><br><br><br>
Peel and slice jicama; cut each slice into 2-inch strips. Combine the jicama strips, orange sections, salt, and chili powder in a bowl; toss gently. Cover; chill 30 minutes. Sprinkle with cilantro. Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 1 cup).
 

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* Exported from MasterCook *<br><br><br><br><b>Orange-Tomato-Jicama Salad</b><br><br><br><br>
Recipe By : Cooking Light, Sept. 1995, page 75<br><br>
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:05<br><br>
Categories : Salads<br><br><br><br>
Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method<br><br>
-------- ------------ --------------------------------<br><br>
2 large navel oranges<br><br>
2 medium tomatoes<br><br>
1 small Jicama -- (8 ounces)<br><br>
1/4 cup orange juice<br><br>
2 tablespoons lemon juice<br><br>
1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro<br><br>
1/8 teaspoon salt<br><br>
1/8 teaspoon pepper<br><br><br><br>
Peel oranges, and cut each crosswise into 4 slices; cut each slice in half, and set aside.<br><br><br><br>
Cut each tomato crosswise into 4 slices, and cut each slice in half; set aside.<br><br><br><br>
Peel jicama, and cut into strips. Place orange, tomato, and jicama in a shallow dish, and drizzle with juices. Sprinkle with cilantro, salt, and pepper; cover and chill. Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 cup).<br><br><br><br>
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Serving Ideas : Toss gently before serving.
 

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<a href="http://www.sallys-place.com/food/columns/ferray_fiszer/jicama.htm" target="_blank">http://www.sallys-place.com/food/col...zer/jicama.htm</a>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the ideas! Joe, I made the Jicama Orange salad...minus the cilantro since I hate it. It's a simple recipe and very yummy!<br><br><br><br>
Jicama, when it's cut up, looks kind of like potato. It's very crunchy and sweet. It has an almost melon taste to me.
 

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Yummy, yummy - Jicama, I was just searching some old recipes and came across a Jicama Orange salad that I made for a party. I remember everyone asking "what is it?" I thought with summer coming it's time to make that again.
 

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Yummmm.... I love jicama! My mother has a recipe for something she calls "crunchy salad" that has jicama in it. I should ask her for the recipe since it's one of the very few things she makes that I can actually eat...<br><br><br><br>
I've heard that you can also treat a jicama like a potato (bake it, mash it, etc) but I'm not sure about that since the only way I've seen jicama done is in its raw form. Anyone know about this?
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by DeeYahMK</i><br><br><b>I've heard that you can also treat a jicama like a potato (bake it, mash it, etc) but I'm not sure about that since the only way I've seen jicama done is in its raw form. Anyone know about this?</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
I've heard you can easily "ruin" a jicama by trying to cook it.<br><br>
That doesn't mean it cannot be cooked; just that you'd better know exactly what you're doing before trying to cook it. I think there are some recipes for cooked jicama out there, but i think they are very rare. In that sense, it is not like a potato, since it is easy to cook a potato.<br><br><br><br>
If you find any recipes for cooked jicama, i'd be interested.<br><br><br><br>
BTW, jicama is very popular in Mexico, Puerto Rico, and many Latin American countries. Not that many people seem to know about it here in the Mainland US, though.
 

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Thanks for the info about trying to cook jicama. I wondered why there were tons of recipes for raw, but none for cooked - now, I know. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Jicama is popular in may Latin American countries, but it's also popular in Arizona and I would also guess, New Mexico but I don't know that for sure. Arizona is where I first heard about it and tried it. It's fabbo cut into strips (about french fry size) with cucumber, also cut into french fry size strips with lime squeezed on it and a hint of real chili powder sprinkled on everything. Just be sure to use chili powder that has only chilis in it and not the blend. If your chili powder lists "chili powder, spices, sugar...." then, you have a blend and it will taste gross (at least, IMO).
 

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I'm in New Mexico and , yes, it is readily available here. To me it tastes like a cross between a potato and an apple, which doesn't sound very tasty, but it certainly is!
 

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I have always been curious about it. It just kinda sits there in the store, and everytime I look at it, I'm curious. But I never bothered with it. Now I think I must try it! All the recipessound yummy! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/lick.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":lick:">
 

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i'm the opposite...i've only had cooked jicama in my vietnamese family.<br><br><br><br>
some of my mom's recipes:<br><br><br><br>
"egg"rolls<br><br>
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amounts can vary according to taste but i've listed ingredients from greatest to least:<br><br>
shredded jicama steamed and juices squeezed out<br><br>
chopped straw mushrooms (found canned at asian market)<br><br>
shredded carrots<br><br>
cellophane noodles soaked in hot water till soft, then chopped (asian market)<br><br>
chopped onion<br><br>
dried black fungus soaked in hot water till soft, then chopped (found in sealed bags at asian market)<br><br>
salt & pepper<br><br>
eggroll wrappers (i don't think they have eggs in it. i think they're called eggrolls because eggs are traditionally used to seal the edges when they're rolled)<br><br><br><br>
mixed everything in a large bowl except the wrappers.<br><br>
with wrapper laid diagonally in front of you, put about 2 spoonfuls of filling at bottom corner and spead mixture out like a little "hotdog". fold bottom corner over, then fold both side corners over. roll tightly and seal with some water mixed with flour.<br><br>
continue with the rest until you run out of filling or wrappers.<br><br>
deep fry eggrolls in oil until golden brown. put on paper towels to soak up extra oil. (i've tried baking them but they turn out very dry and don't brown well)<br><br>
sorry it's not more specific but i never measure when i make them.<br><br>
i usually eat them plain or dipped in hot&sour sauce or sweet chili sauce that i get at the asian market.
 

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one of my favorite foods: uses COOKED jicama<br><br><br><br>
spring rolls<br><br>
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shredded jicama (steamed alone or saute with carrots, tofu, and salt)<br><br>
carrots cut into "matchsticks" or sliced very thinly<br><br>
sliced tofu (can be used raw or lightly browned in a pan)<br><br>
cucumber sliced very thinly<br><br>
lettuce (any type with soft leaves)<br><br>
mint<br><br><br><br>
rice paper<br><br><br><br>
dipping peanut sauce:<br><br>
equal parts hoisin sauce, peanut butter and water. mix together over medium heat until it just boils. adjust proportions according to taste. add chili and chopped roasted peanuts according to taste.<br><br><br><br>
to make springrolls:<br><br>
1. wet i rice paper quickly under running water or large bowl.<br><br>
2. lay paper down in front of you (it might not be soft yet but by the time you add all the ingredients, it will soften up)<br><br>
3. add as much as you like of each ingredient. (i usually add lettuce and mint first to reinforce the rice paper.) fold bottom over, then sides over and roll. (if it hasn't soften up yet, sprinkle more water over hard areas)<br><br>
4. dip in peanut sauce.<br><br><br><br>
i usually roll 1 and eat it right away and then roll more as i eat. you can get everyone involved and have them roll their own (except my father who expects me to roll all of his springrolls!)<br><br><br><br>
again, i apologize that it's not more specific but amounts really vary according to taste.<br><br><br><br>
a variation: instead of jicama, you can use rice vermicelli noodles or brown rice.
 
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