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<a href="http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/004/37.120.html" target="_blank">http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/...04/37.120.html</a><br><br><br><br>
Raising the moral status of dogs has created a breed of snarling, dangerous humans.<br><br><br><br>
Christianity Today Magazine<br><br>
By Charles Colson with Anne Morse | posted 04/03/2003<br><br><br><br>
In case you haven't noticed, animal-rights activists have become increasingly active. Consider the following: Last year the California Milk Advisory Board ran its "happy cows" ads featuring singing, wisecracking dairy cows contentedly munching grass in bucolic bliss. Viewers loved them, but in December, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals sued, claiming the ads violate consumer protection laws by deceiving consumers about the way cows actually live. (Note to PETA: cows don't really sing, either.)<br><br><br><br>
In Illinois last June, PETA was outraged when a casino invited customers to play ticktacktoe against chickens. PETA objected to "the Chicken Challenge" because the game "disrespected chickens."<br><br><br><br>
In Phoenix, a teacher threatened to sic her classroom of six-year-olds on a seafood restaurant to force the owner to stop its "cruel" practice of putting live beta fish on display in fish bowls. The fish were ultimately put up for adoption.<br><br><br><br>
It's hard not to laugh at stories like these, and that's usually what we do. Until recently, the animal-rights movement has been viewed as little more than a radical fringe group. But in truth its proponents have a serious agendaone that challenges Christianity's most fundamental doctrines. And one, as I discovered in the last election, that is having a surprising impact on the public.<br><br><br><br>
On Florida's ballot was a constitutional amendment to outlaw housing pregnant sows in stalls so small the pigs can't turn around. I was certain my fellow voters would not put such a thing in the state constitution. To my amazement, they did54 to 46 percent.<br><br><br><br>
As Michael Pollan writes in a brilliant New York Times Magazine article, the animal-rights movement is scoring remarkable triumphs in its effort to have animals declared morally equivalent to humans. Last year, for instance, Germans passed a law "obliging the state to respect and protect the dignity" of animals just as it does humans. In England, the farming of animals for fur was recently outlawed.<br><br><br><br>
Here at home, a recent poll found that just over half of all Americans think primates should have the same rights as human children. Though it's hard to imagine anyone taking Princeton philosopher Peter Singer seriously given that he advocates bestiality, his book Animal Liberation has converted thousands to vegetarianism.<br><br><br><br>
To be sure, some changes in how animals are treated on farms, in labs, and in zoos may be needed. But at the same time, we must understand that much more than humane concerns is driving the modern animal-rights movement.<br><br><br><br>
Scottish philosopher Alex MacDonald explains that as Darwinian theories of evolution gained favor, animal-rights advocates could logically argue there is no essential difference between humans and animals. Professor Singer, for instance, writes, "On the basis of evolution . . . there is no clear dividing line between humans and animals."<br><br><br><br>
PETA's Ingrid Newkirk even compares eating meat to the Nazis' Holocaust and openly says the animal-rights movement is "at great odds" with "supremacist" Christian teachings.<br><br><br><br>
Ominously, some animal-rights activists carry their logic to extremes: If it's "murder" to kill a chicken, for instance, it's morally acceptable to try to stop the "murderer." Wesley Smith writes on National Review Online about animal-rights terrorists who employ "death threats, fire bombings, and violent assaults against those they accuse of abusing animals."<br><br><br><br>
One such group, the Animal Liberation Front, "posted a how-to-commit-arson manual on its website," Smith says. In the Netherlands, an activist is charged in the assassination of a candidate for parliamentone who had publicly defended pig farming.<br><br><br><br>
Clearly, animal-rights proponents are seriousand dangerous. Charles Oliver of Reason magazine puts it well: "By placing chickens and Jews on the same ethical plane," as Newkirk does, "animal rights activists may inadvertently make it easier for a future Hitler to herd millions of humans into gas chambers."<br><br><br><br>
Oliver is right. The philosophy behind the animal-rights agenda is an assault on human dignity. As Christians, we have a moral duty to respect the animal world as God's handiwork, treating animals with "the mercy of our Maker," as Christian writer Matthew Scully writes in his excellent new book, Dominion.<br><br><br><br>
But mercy and respect for animals are completely different from rights for animalsand we should never confuse the two.
 

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To the Editor:<br><br><br><br>
Charles Colson and Anne Morse rightly call Michael Pollan's New York Times Magazine article on animal rights "brilliant" and Matthew Scully's new book Dominion, "excellent." One central premise of both works is that animals on today's factory farms are treated in ways that are unnatural and merciless, and that the conditions demand that people of kindness will categorically refuse to support this horrible violence. Both Pollan and Scully refuse to eat any chicken, pork, or other meat from grocery stores or restaurants; Scully eats a completely vegetarian diet.<br><br><br><br>
As Christians, we recall that Christ was scorned for His extension of kindness to tax collectors and prostitutes. Central to the Lord's work was His outreach to the oppressed, the weak, those in suffering. Accordingly, Christians are called to advocate for animals precisely because we strive to imitate the life and ministry of Jesus.<br><br><br><br>
Every time we eat, we make a decision about who we are in the world: Do we support Christ's mercy, love, and compassion? Or do we support a system that denies God's animals everything for which He designed them, every kindness, and slaughters them in ways that elevate the moral system of 'might makes right' to its highest level? For Christians, today's factory farming systems demand that we eat a vegetarian diet.<br><br><br><br>
Daniel Paden, Director<br><br>
Catholic Vegetarian Association
 

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Some how, I just cant believe someone who base their entire thought process on a book complied 1500 yeas ago. (I think that was the first time it was put to paper, wasnt it?)<br><br>
It is a mystery to me why these people spend so much time on a radical fringe group when so mach is amiss in there own church.
 

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"It's hard not to laugh at stories like these, and that's usually what we do."<br><br>
-----------------------------<br><br><br><br>
These are christians ... not very good ones.<br><br><br><br><br><br>
Blah ... the whole article is not worthy of my picking apart
 

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Arg, Chuck Colson. I hear his radio broadcasts now and then, and I agree with some of the stuff he says, but he seems much too past-looking for my tastes. We DIDN'T have it better off 50, 100, or 150 years ago. We still have big problems, just maybe different ones are on the forefront.<br><br><br><br>
The Letter to the Editor seemed much more reasoned than what Colson said.
 

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I absolutely agree with the hypocrisy of "Christianity"! One minute they're vegetarians (genesis), the next it's if you can catch it you can eat it (the rest of the bible). Love thy neighbour, unless he's gay. Turn the other cheek, unless he's an abortion doctor. So confusing. I considered becoming a Budhist, but after reviewing the ethics of the local temple I'm rethinking that decision. I was initially drawn by the fact that they "preached" vegetarianism, but aparently, that too is optional. Agghhhh. Shall I not be saved? It's a good thing I don't believe in hell.
 

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yes that is why the nice religious people are hard to believe-<br><br>
you would think they have holy compassion and would be for the animals and humane treatment or even the complete abandonment of condoning animal farming
 

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It seems to me that religion (Christianity) has become about, "I'm going to heaven, you're going to hell...na na na na na". I haven't attended church to pray in a million years. The last time I was in a church was for a wedding and I can't believe how many people ignored the preacher in order to get a good look at who was there and what they were wearing. I love religion and I think that it is AMAZING. But really, what would Jesus say about the big gold, diamond studded crosses we wear around our necks in devotion to him? Do the Budhist monks fear that last night's steak dinner was actually Aunt Martha? Why can't we all just get along (and that includes the non-human animal portion of Us)??!!??
 

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That would be quite a fight, way better than anything in the WWF or NWO or whatever. I'm not sure who would win. I don't think Jesus could attack. He would just use his omnipotent powers to defend himself. But the animals would be trying to bite or claw or hoof him. Ultimately, I guess it would be a draw, but it would certainly be a sight.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by Raine</i><br><br><b>I absolutely agree with the hypocrisy of "Christianity"! One minute they're vegetarians (genesis), the next it's if you can catch it you can eat it (the rest of the bible). Love thy neighbour, unless he's gay. Turn the other cheek, unless he's an abortion doctor. So confusing. I considered becoming a Budhist, but after reviewing the ethics of the local temple I'm rethinking that decision. I was initially drawn by the fact that they "preached" vegetarianism, but aparently, that too is optional. Agghhhh. Shall I not be saved? It's a good thing I don't believe in hell.</b></div>
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that's funny that you mention this. i too have been considering become buddhist lately. however, i find it pretty ironic that you have the audacity to criticize christianity for not being accepting of something that you agree with (i.e. it's ok for people to be homosexual) but when buddhism is accepting of something you don't agree with (i.e. people are free to choose vegetarianism), you criticize this too. so which is it? a religion must adhere strictly to <i>your</i> morals? the religion should accept those things that you belief are right and not allow those things that you believe are wrong?<br><br><br><br>
thankfully buddhism is more open-minded than yourself, no offense.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>That Alpaca Guy</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I cant stand people who hail the bible and not the principles behind it.</div>
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the sticky part of that situation is that we all will get different principles out of the Bible. we live in a fallen world, and when sin entered the picture waaaay back with adam and eve, we all got confused and mis-guided. (which is why, i think, there are hoards of denonimnations all under one umbrella of christianity). so the principles should be basic, and are clearly told to us in Galatians. but we stupid humans think whatever we want, and assume we're right because we're here right now and are living right now and assume that when God created these animals (and everything else) He didn't know what He was doing, and we know better. He did tell us to take care of His creation... and that dominion so many people use to say eating meat is *right*... that dominion is, i think, supposed to be that we have respect for what we are given! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/smiley.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":)"> and take good care of it, not commit gruesome and sufferable death.... not to kill our domesticated animals just because there are too many of them, and on that same note, to be mindful of how these animals are reproducing! if we, as the responsible ones, cannot handle the 6 animals that are spawned, we should see to it that our pet friends practice abstinance <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"><br><br><br><br>
anyway... this is a great topic!
 
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