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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
By the way, I made it with soymilk and it worked. However the texture was a little creamier than I remember cooked pudding being, from my childhood. Less jellyistic. I wonder if casein really affects the way the gelling, mostly from corstarch, turns out.

I made a pudding with "instant tapioca" that came out with a firmer gel, more jellyistic, jellier, that i liked better.

2 cups soy milk, 4 tablespoons instant tapioca (tho the package direction say 3 tablespoons tapioca and 2 3/4 cups of milk), 1/2 cup sugar, 1/4 tsp salt, 4 teaspoons cocoa powder, 1/4 tsp vanilla extract.

You can leave out the cocoa powder and use less sugar -- to make vanilla tapioca pudding. You can add 1 to 2 tsp of wheat gluten, to either pudding, to improve the protein content of the finished pudding, and I think improve the flavor and texture too.

Instant tapioca produces a kind of lumpy or bumpy textured pudding -- which I really like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Although if it is made from non-plant sources, just what earthly origins can we trace it to? Saying it is "synthetic" tells us next to nothing about it, except that people didn't find it exactly in the form that it is, when they sell it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Kreeli writes: "maple syrup, cocoa powder"

I find that the flavor of maple syrup clashes with that of cocoa powder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
The Jell-o Cook & Serve pudding box says the fumaric acid is there "for thickening." As is of course the corn starch, and the carrageenan.

There is also "cornstarch modified." Modified how, and why? To adjust the kind and degree of thickening, the range of liquid that is acceptable? What?

Malic acid is, supposedly, usually added to influence the flavor of food. It is a "nice fruity-tasty" acid. I didn't realize fumaric acid, derived from it, it is a thickener.

What is the relationship between malic acid and fumaric acid? Why use one and not the other.

Umm, this is a real question, not a quiz question.

I think the fumaric acid doesn't cause thickening itself, but rather, I think it stabilizes the overall pH of the formula, so that the cornstarch doesn't thicken too much or too little, always thickens about the same amount, as different amounts of different acids (furit flavors?) or bases (milk, soymilk, alkaline process cocoa) are added or subtracted from the overall formula.
 

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good that was a quiz because I was about to explode at the ignorance of you soilman, lol, but you were doing it on purpose, so I can laugh! Your too funny...
 
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