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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently read that most meat substitutes that contain soy like Gardenburger, Boca, and Morningstar generally have very little, like one gram or something of isoflavones per serving in their products. The article I read said that these products were very safe to eat because of the absence of the isoflavones compared to other soy products. I was just wondering if anyone has any info they can share on this because of my growing concern of isoflavones mutating human cells etc.
 

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wow, i've never seen anything that totes the fact of products not containing isoflavones as a good thing. to me that's a 'nice' way of saying: these products are so processed as to contain little to none of the original nutrients.<br><br><br><br><a href="http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/soyiso/" target="_blank">here</a> is a comprehensive review of isoflavones by the oregon state university.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>catswym</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
wow, i've never seen anything that totes the fact of products not containing isoflavones as a good thing. to me that's a 'nice' way of saying: these products are so processed as to contain little to none of the original nutrients.<br></div>
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I believe I read about this in a Vegetarian Times, I'll see if I can find the article.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>hollywoodveg</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I believe I read about this in a Vegetarian Times, I'll see if I can find the article.</div>
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Okay, I just rememberd it wasn't in Vegetarian Times it was in a Consumer Reports study that I read. I will try and find it and post it later.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>hollywoodveg</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I was just wondering if anyone has any info they can share on this because of my growing concern of isoflavones mutating human cells etc.</div>
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I don't know where you got your info about supposed mutagenicity, but if you can't find a study that says so by running a search on pubmed.gov there's basically no evidence for it. That said, you should never buy the info without checking the paper for logical flaws carefully anyway.<br><br><br><br>
Just a quick example:<br><br><br><br>
McClain et al., Genetic toxicity studies with genistein, Food Chem Toxicol. 2006 Jan;44(1):42-55. Epub 2005 Sep 28<br><br><br><br>
The last paragraph reads:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">In conclusion, genistein is uniformly negative for mutations in bacterial systems; however, in vitro genistein is clastogenic in several mammalian systems. As confirmed in these series of studies, there is no evidence for genotoxicity in the in vivo micronucleus test even at doses as high as 2000 mg/kg. The no observed effect plasma exposure levels of genistein in rats greatly exceed that observed in the plasma of Asian populations indicating that there is a wide margin of safety with respect to expected human exposures of approximately 50 mg/day. In addition, the mode of action for the topoisomerase II class of drugs is generally considered to be a threshold based process. Thus, it is unlikely that genistein poses a relevant genotoxic risk in vivo.</div>
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