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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was mentioned on the 'Sex In The City' thread that vegetarian and veganism are now trendy. It was stated that it is wrong to become a veg*n just to be trendy. I disagreed with this assesment. I feel any reason to go veggie is a good reason. What do the rest of you think?
 

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Keep in mind there's a thread about the show's content already - <a href="http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/showthread.php?s=&threadid=7406" target="_blank">here</a>. The threads will have to be merged if the two threads start to lean towards redundancy.
 

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I think her point is that this is a separate question, not about the show. She's referring to my post, which expressed annoyance at trends causing people to become vegan or whatever purely to be trendy. I agree that some people may actually be attracted to the lifestyle once they've experimented with it, but I also believe you end up with people who (while they may have temporarily reduced demand for animal products) end up becoming "ex-vegetarians" that often decry vegetarianism as being too hard, or whatever. I call them dilettantes, and I think they do more harm than good in the long run (and really, the long run is more important than the short run). I'd rather see "purer" motives for making any choice in life other than peer pressure or trying to be cool.
 

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Yeah I kinda missed the word "thread" in the post. no worries. we're all friends here.<br><br><br><br>
for the record, there are no bad reasons to go vegetarian. i can't even think of any damage done by those trending the veg-life. <i>if</i> an ex-veg*n decries veg*nism, i think you have to analyze their argument just like that of any other neigh-sayer. seems to me, also, that people who do <i>anything</i> for a trend just hop to the next one without any care to decry the trends they once hopped, both for fear of being labelled a trend-hopper and also because they're too busy looking for the <i>next</i> trend.
 

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I agree with epski.<br><br><br><br>
I think reasons matter and some are better than others. But, no matter the reasons...the animals benefit. (unless they revert back to an omni diet)<br><br><br><br>
I once heard someone say that Abe Lincoln freed the slaves only "for political reasons" now, I have no idea if that is true, but if it is, then I would think a lot less of him.<br><br><br><br>
If one is a vegetarian purely for their own health, it is not nearly as admirable (IMO) than if they are vegetarian to prevent the cruelty and death that a meat based diet causes.<br><br><br><br>
I view vegetarians for health/fashion the same as I view omnis.
 

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lots i'm sure.<br><br><br><br>
i agree with mushroom, i may not view health/fashion veggies as omni's but i certaionaly have less, or a different sort of respect from them. i might have a respect for their diet, but it would take longer for me o respect THEM.
 

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When I initially read the title of this thread I was quick to say, Hey whatever works. But after reading Epski's post I must say I changed my mind. He makes a good point. A little dedication, work, research and sincerity never hurt. It cheapens what I consider a relatively high ideal that requires a great deal of work to become merely a "trendetarian" (to quote Kurmudgeon).
 

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I wouldn't mind if everybody would turn veggie because it's "the trend", but a trend always stop at a certain point.<br><br><br><br>
In general I would say that it's not a good idea to do this because "everybody does it" or because it's so "hot ".<br><br><br><br>
"trendetarians" is a nice word; here they are called "part-time vegetarians"
 

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I can think of one wrong reason - you have a vegetarian boyfriend or girlfriend, and you want to please them. My cousin dated a vegetarian. She made the switch for him, and the relationship went down the drain. She's gone back to the meat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Wow! I am really surprised at how exclusive many of you appear to be! So the only respectful way to become a veg*n is to decide for yourself that you dont want to harm animals. That is really close minded, imo.<br><br><br><br>
And Loki, I have to respectfully disagree with you about switching because of a significant other. When I met my now husband, he was a vegan. He explained to me why he was a vegan and how important it was that I at least become a vegetarian. He gave me the book, Diet For A New America and I read it cover to cover. I told him if I found it easy, I would become a vegan. And I did. I was a strict vegan (is that redundant <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)"> ) for a little over a year. My opinions on veganism have changed and morphed and now I am a pescatarian. I am very happy with my diet and we are raising our son to be a vegetarian. My husband had become a vegan from being a part time vegetarian because the woman he dated before me was a vegan and got him to change. So from that woman, there are three new vegetarians.<br><br><br><br>
My son will have no choice about being vegetarian inside of our home. Outside of our home I hope he makes the choices we will have raised him to make, but he has free will, just like all humans. So does that make him less of a vegetarian because he was raised with vegetarianism and it wasnt really a choice in our home? Was I less of vegan because I did it for love?<br><br><br><br>
I am just shocked at how judgemental some of the responses to my question are. The way I see it, any form of vegetarianism is a good thing, no matter how a person may come to that decision.
 

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I agree with loki. I think his point is that you should never do something just to 'please' someone else.<br><br><br><br>
I think your reasons for becoming vegetarian (and our reasons, on here) are as varied and numerous as the people on this board. And I agree with scareyvegan yet again, that any reason, other than the one loki mentioned, is a good one.<br><br><br><br>
Oh wait. There are a few vegans on here and other places who have gone veg*n to help their eating disorder along and I believe that is a terrible reason. Solely because this is about self distruction and is really unhealthy. And when you mention you're a vegan and you look skelatal...well, it really doesn't do anything to encourage others to change their habits. And because I think that until you are healthy and helping yourself...being compassionate towards yourself, you can't truly show compassion towards any of your fellow beings.<br><br><br><br>
B
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We are living at the beginning of the animal rights movement, itself arguably a trend but one i think is here to stay. I have little doubt that we will reach a point where meat is eaten only by a few non-trendy types.<br><br><br><br>
I'd settle for that.
 

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It's used for people who (intentionally) don't eat meat on a few days a week.<br><br><br><br>
They need a word for it so they can be put in the statistics.
 

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I'm surprised, beachgirl, that you find many here to be exclusionary. I don't think that's quite accurate, I think that many just want something that is such an important part of their lives to be treated with respect and to be taken seriously. It <i>is</i> important to exhibit and exercise a little respect for a massive lifestyle and mental/spritiual shift that others have worked hard to develop and have devoted much care and time to. Of course, everyone has to start somewhere, but when one jumps on a bandwagon for frivolous reasons they usually are a poor spokesperson and don't have much gumption to stick to their new found regimen. If the trend jumping is a kick start to some contemplation and research then great, but if it's short-lived and empty then it might be more of a hinderance than a help.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block"><i>Originally posted by 1vegan</i><br><br><b>They need a word for it so they can be put in the statistics.</b></div>
</div>
<br><br><br>
Omnivore.
 

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I don't necessarily think that this is a wrong reason, because I don't think vegetarianism could ever be wrong, but I think it would be difficult if a person became vegetarian for someone else or because it is trendy and doesn't really feel passionately about it himself/herself. I think as long as the person fully believes in the journey of vegetarianism then more power to them. When people become veggie because they are trying to impress someone or because they want to fit into the trendy society and don't fully believe in the cause themselves - well that could cause some problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Trend: the general course or prevailing tendency (Random House Dictionary)<br><br><br><br>
Using this definition of 'trend' I would love it if the prevailing tendency would be a vegetarian diet. Just because someone discovers something they enjoy because it became trendy doesnt mean it is frivolus or disrespectful.<br><br><br><br>
For example, I never really listened to swing music until a few years ago when it became 'trendy'. I went to the Derby and danced and bought some swing CDs. Now I throughly enjoy Big Band, Swing, Ska and Rocksteady music. So I discovered something through a trend. What is wrong with that? If someone discovers vegetarianism through a trend, is it wrong or does that make them less of a vegetarian. I have understood some people who have responded to this thread as saying they think those people are less of a vegetarian and they respect them less. I think that is sad and closeminded.<br><br><br><br>
BTW I didnt say everyone on veggieboards feels this way, just the people who responded they did.<br><br><br><br>
What if a person saw a PETA video of downed cows or debeaking chickens, became a veg*n for a period of time, but then decided to become an omni again. Then they talk about how they felt weak and lightheaded while veg*n and how they feel so much better eating meat. Were they more of a vegetarian then someone who went to a raw food restaurant opening just for kicks, loved the food, started to research the lifestyle and then became a vegetarian? It just seems to me that saying one way of becoming a vegetarian is 'better' then another is an exclusionary way of thinking.
 
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