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Totally stupid question, and I know it really dosen't matter, but we are studying taxonomy in marine biology class, and when we were discussing sponges being in the animalia kingdom, I randomly wondered if sponge is considered a meat. Sure, a better question would be to ask WHY do you want to eat a sponge, but lets not cloud the issue with the facts.

So, would you eat a sponge?

Is it unvegan to use a natural sea sponge?

btw, do you think sponges feel pain? I asked my teacher this, and he wasn't sure.

Of course, in this thread, I am talking about the natural sea sponges, not the synthetic ones.
 

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I wouldn't use a sea sponge for anything (unless I was stranded on an island). They are in the animal kingdom, and as a vegan I avoid the use of anything in the animal kingdom as I am able.

Random: Diva Cups are better than sea sponges for menstrual purposes.
 

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They are part of the animal kingdom, yes. Sea sponges, well, the dead, spongey part anyway, regularly wash up on the local beach. I have no moral objections to grabbing one, cleaning it, and using it, if you are so inclined. Not really vegan, it's using an animal after all, but I have no moral or ethical objections to it. Buying sea sponges from a shop would be problematic - you have no idea where they come from.

ETA: I don't see how this is a stupid question and if you feel it matters to you, then it's matters.
 

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I am with Kiz on this one. Essentially, it's not vegan to use them because they are animals. If one died naturally and you want to use its remains, while it technically would not be vegan, I wouldn't even bother to frown. Only question I would have is if the eco-system has already found its own use for washed up sponges.
 

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No, loofahs grown on a vine, in a pod. A friend of mine grew one from seeds I actually found in a loofah once.
 

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I think loofahs are natural sea sponges, so the answer would be yes.

ETA: If Kiz is right, then ignore my answer.


And no, it's not a stupid question. There is such a wide variety of sea life that it can be confusing for most people. I'm sure there are plenty of people out there who think sponges are plants. Some sea creatures are confusing if you don't have contact with them or by their name. Sea cucumbers, for example, are animals, not plants, but you'd never guess that from the name.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinoderm

And of course we all know there are people out there who think fish are plants. *still looking for that elusive fish tree*
 

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As far as I know the natural sea sponge is not meat. It is the "skeleton" of the animal. Sponges are invertebrates and have a skeleton made of calcium carbonate somewhat like coral does.

I have quite a few of them growing in my aquarium. They are very interesting. I'd never eat one or use one for cleaning purposes. To me they're pets just like my corals and fish.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amy SF View Post

I think loofahs are natural sea sponges, so the answer would be yes.

ETA: If Kiz is right, then ignore my answer.


And no, it's not a stupid question. There is such a wide variety of sea life that it can be confusing for most people. I'm sure there are plenty of people out there who think sponges are plants. Some sea creatures are confusing if you don't have contact with them or by their name. Sea cucumbers, for example, are animals, not plants, but you'd never guess that from the name.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinoderm

And of course we all know there are people out there who think fish are plants. *still looking for that elusive fish tree*
What does ETA mean?

And is 'luffa' an incorrect, erm I mean an American spelling of loofah?
 

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Even if I wasn't veg I wouldn't eat a sponge... seems like the texture would be all nasty. It's always kind of grossed me out that people use natural sea sponges to wash with... like scrubbing yourself with fish or something...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkySoStarry View Post

btw, do you think sponges feel pain? I asked my teacher this, and he wasn't sure.
Sponges (porifera) don't have any sort of nervous system or sensory organs. Your teacher should have known this if they're even the slightest bit qualified to teach marine biology.
 

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I wouldn't call it meat b/c meat is tissue and sponges only have a cellular level of organization. I don't even consider sponges to be 'animals'; they are in kingdom Animalia b/c they are multicellular, with eukaryotic cells, are heterotrophic, and lack cell walls, but since sponges don't have a nervous system, which as far as I know (for this world anyway) is needed to be able to feel pain, my compassion does not extend to them.

ShellyT, I think you mixing up the kind of sponges. Sponges' "skeletons" are made out of spicules, and 3 classes of sponges are based on what their spicules are made out of; one class has spicules made out of calcium carbonate, another silica (glass), and the ones that are used as bath sponges have protein (specifically spongin) based spicules.
 

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Sea sponges have been around for centuries and are a vital part of the animal kingdom. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes and can be found in both salt and fresh water. The most common type of sea sponge is the dead, spongey part that is often used for bathing and cleaning.

As far as I know the natural sea sponge is not meat. Sponges are animals that live in salt water. They have no backbone or other internal skeleton. The sponge is really a collection of tiny cells that work together. These cells filter food from the water and pass it to other cells for digestion.
 
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