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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering if organic is really better. My husband says there are pesticides in the fertilizer used for growing organic since they probably use horse or cow manure which has all the toxins in it that makes meats so unhealthy.

Also, do the fruit and vegetable washes for non-organic produce work and what are some good brands?

What environmentally safe cleaning products do you use and where can I get them?

Thanks so much for the info?

Barb
 

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It is better.

You must think bigger then your kitchen. Organic is better for the health of the land, the water and the workers. Soil is a living thing that chemicals kill just as surly as pesticides kill insects, birds, fish and all creatures that consume them.

Chemicals used in the agro business are suspect in the geneses of cancers and birth defects, and that is just the most obvious problems.

Mild soap such as dr.bonners and tap water will clean produce, just do not use too much soap, a drop in a tub of water is just fine. Since no insecticide is used on organics watch for well-camouflaged life in your broccoli, carefully lift them out and set them free.

Others will give more detail, I have to get out and walk before church.
 

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Hm. I'm the Evil Backwards Vegetarian Who Does Not Care for the Earth.

Organic is great and all.. And, I understand the benefits.. but. Sometimes I want my tomatoes to *look* like tomatoes. I want them all uniform.. not funny shapes as they randomly grew...

Is that awful?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by CharityAJO

Sometimes I want my tomatoes to *look* like tomatoes. I want them all uniform.. not funny shapes as they randomly grew...

Personally, I'd rather have them *taste* like tomatoes... but to each his own.


I buy organic when I can afford it because it tastes better -- especially carrots, tomatoes & bell peppers. In the summer I get most of my produce from friends' and families' back yards, though.


Mskedi
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Organic (fair trade) coffee tastes good. Regular coffee is icky. Really. Especially the espresso. I always buy organic produce and I think it tastes much better. And the tomatoes look better than the regular ones.
The price is quite high, naturally, but as long as I can afford it..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've noticed a huge difference in taste between organic and non-organic. No..it's not psychosomatic! LOL. I didn't know I was eating an organic strawberry, and was thinking it was the tastiest, sweetest strawberry I've ever had, and THEN the lady that gave it to me told me that it was organic. It was so incredibly delicious.
 

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yes barb, definately


i'm so happy to see that others here are eating organic too!

i eat about 98% organic everything and can definately taste a difference in certain foods.



i choose organic for my health, for the environment and for other beings that live on this earth.

there have been studies showing that organic produce has higher amounts of nutrients/vitamins/minerals too.


i quickly found this info >>>>

( http://www.freshlife.com/articles/orgvcom.htm )

Organic verses Commercial Is there a Difference?

Recent research confirms that organic produce, grown without harsh chemicals and harmful substances, is healthier to consume than their conventionally grown counterparts. A study published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 2001;7(2):161 proves the significant nutritional advantages of consuming organic verses conventionally grown foods. After 1,240 comparisons of 35 vitamins and minerals in organic and conventional produce, the organic versions were found to contain higher amounts of most vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C (+27%), magnesium (+29%), chromium (+ 86%), and selenium (+372%). They were also lower in cancer-causing nitrates (-15%) and toxic heavy metals. The study also demonstrated that the routine consumption of organic fruits and vegetables instead of conventional, can mean the difference between getting the USDA recommended daily allowance (RDA) of a nutrient or not! So, are organics worth it? Without a doubt!

Cost is often a factor that concerns people when talking about organics. Its true that the time and energy put into growing organically deserves more money, however, these cleaner choices do not have to be more expensive than conventional. Take a close look at the store you are purchasing from, buy seasonally, and purchase in bulk when possible.
 

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organic wins hands down. does your body really need pesticides and synthetically made products? i don't think so. go organic all the way.
 

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I've taken too many classes that discuss the horrors of pesticides. I buy organic as much as possible. However, sometimes finacal restraints keep me from buying everything organic. When I get a real job and make more money, I plan on buyng mostly organic. I truely beleive that it is much better for the envirnment and for people.
 

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I pretty much never eat organic, due to financial constraints and that fact that my parents could care less. In the summer, however, we grow an organic garden.

I want to ask, where do you purchase your organic produce? Frequently, when I buy things from the local store that are organic, I find the results disappointing. The produce is often tasteless and wilted, although I have to wonder if this is merely because few people buy it, and consequently, it sits on the shelf for awhile. Obviously organic is better for the earth, though. I really wish my parents would go organic!


lovenlight,

linz
 

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We have a small organic farm here in Santa Barbara. Its strange to have a small farm in the middle of a city, but I love it. They have a great produce stand. Unfourtently some of the locals here are trying to shut it down. They complain about how dirt flies into their swimming pools. Sheeesh. The farm was here long before the houses were.

Also, if you go to the local farmers market, alot of the farmers there sell organic foods.
 

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herself writes:

=====================

I've noticed a huge difference in taste between organic and non-organic. No..it's not psychosomatic! LOL. I didn't know I was eating an organic strawberry, and was thinking it was the tastiest, sweetest strawberry I've ever had, and THEN the lady that gave it to me told me that it was organic. It was so incredibly delicious.

======================

A neigbor came to visit me, and I gave her a handful of greenbeans -- the kind where you eat the whole juicy pod, before the beans inside mature. I had climbing beans. Almost all commercial growers, organic or non-organic, grow bush-beans. They are easier to pick.

My neigbor said they were the juiciest, sweetest, most flavorful, most delicious greenbeans she had ever tasted.

Those greenbeans were not grown organicly.

Yes, the soil they were grown in had, added to it, compost made from lawn-grass that was growing in my fenced in backyard, near the garden area; leaves collected from my backyard, and from neigbors who raked the leaves on their lawn; seaweed collected from the nearby bay off the Atlantic Ocean; crop residues such as cornstalks; and kitchen vegetable matter waste such as banana peels, orange skins that had been treated with fungicides and artificial colors, carrot leaves, lettuce that started to rot before I could eat the whole head, etcetera.

Every year I had added maybe about 20 pounds of compost to this 100 sq ft of soil.

That compost would pretty much qualify as an organic soil amendment, despite the fungicide in the orange peels. But after I added that compost, I tested my soil for nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, and pH, and I discovered that, for the particular plant I was growing, increase N, P, and K could produce a better yield. So I added triple-super-phosphate (made from phosphate rock), which is not considered organic; potassium pentoxide, derived from mineral sources that have been altered chemically -- making them non "organic" once they have been altered chemically; and various sources of nitrogen, such as sodium nitrate (quick release), and ammonium sulfate, and urea -- all of which were derived from industrially produced ammonia, made from the nitrogen in the air, and the hydrogen in natural gas -- and not considered organic because it does not come from natural plant or animal sources -- it is chemically altered air and natural gas, and as a result of tha chemical alteration, not considred organic -- made in a giant factory too. But this stuff provides much more nitrogen per pound of stuff I have to carry around. The highest quality compost is about 1.5 percent nitrogen (.015); urea is 45 percent nitrogen (.45).

Tests showed that maxium yield of beans would occur if I added about .25 pounds of Nitrogen to the 100 square feet of soil in which I would be growing the beans, before planting the seeds. To do that, I could have added 1/2 a pound of urea, or about 17 more pounds of compost. For 1000 square feet, that would be about 5 pounds of urea, or 170 pounds of compost. Obtaining 170 pound of compost requires collecting maybe about 20 40-gallon bags of leaves and 20 40-gallon bags of grass clippings, and putting them in a pile about 20 feet long by 6 feet wide by 3 feet high (i'm just estimating the amount of bags of material; i'm describing the actual amount of finished compost fairly precisely). It is a lot easier to just go get a 5-pound bag of urea for about $6.00.

I attribute the superb flavor of the green beans to the compost, and the nature of the materials from which the compost was made. I attribute the large yield, without me needing to go to a lot of extra work, to the addition of 1/2 a pound of urea (and sources of phosporous and potassim too). Without that extra handuf of urea, I would have gotten only about 2/3's as many pounds of green beans; the beans would have been smaller and probably less juicy. Without the compost, the beans would have had inferior flavor and character.

I think I must have produced about 35 pounds of green beans in 100 square feet of space. I'm just estimating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I do not see any difference in taste between store-purchased organic and non-organic and, due to the outrageous prices, I cannot afford it. With a typical grocery budget of $10 weekly, I cannot afford $4 for a head of broccoli and $5 for a vine of tomatos.

I do find a difference between home-grown vegetables, though (organic or not).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, if it's a strange fluke..it's one that happens often.


The regular grocery stores are the worst place to get organic produce, price-wise. They charge WAY to much. Local farmer's markets, and health food stores are much cheaper.
 

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it's a falsity that organic produce is grown without pesticides or fungicides; commercially grown organics are sprayed with "approved" chemicals...like nicotine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Kreeli, that's why things often taste better coming out of your garden.

I live in Edmonton, AB and fresh, local produce is 2 month summer thing. So, I'm stuck with the non-organic kinds and I'm ok with that.
 

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Despite higher prices, I've made a comitment to organic foods recently because I just in my heart feel it's better for the environment. No it isn't perfect...and many contain some pesticides probably that are approved....I'm not quite as well read on the subject as I should be.

But I think many of us know it's better for the environment. And I don't think that doing something (even if it isn't everything) is the same as doing nothing.

We've really got to start to look at our world and what's going to happen to it if we keep treating it the way we have been. And you know, it's a group effort.

my two cents. I do understand the money concernes, I'm on a very tight budget myself. But I've found farmer's markets where veggies are cheap and organic, and organice grains I buy in bulk to save money at my local hfs.

B
 

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> Sometimes I want my tomatoes to *look* like tomatoes.

You mean you want the tomatoes look like what you think tomatoes should look like.

Uniformity is a human concept, invented perhaps by bureaucrats so that they can tag and label everything. It is a purely theoretical excercise. You will not find two blades of grass that look perfectly alike in nature.

Sadly, we forcefully apply this uniformity concept to nature (all tomatoes HAVE to look alike or I won't buy it), and this (plus other things) leads to the tragedy of industrial agriculture.

BTW.... even organic agriculture is not sustainable in the long run. It is not a smarter way to farm, it merely is a jump some 100 years backwards in time and technology. We need to even go further than organic if we want to stick around for many many more generations.

I still buy organic whenever I can, because it IS better for the environment, and it is much better for me (no chemicals on it).

Also BarbB, harmful chemicals tend to accumulate as you go up in the food chain. I.e., its true that organic produce MIGHT have some chemicals because of the use of manure from non-organic manure. But it's much better to eat the soybean directly. Because if you feed that soybean to a cow, and eat the flesh of the cow, it will have a higher concentration of the chemical than the original soybean.
 

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the only benefit to commercially grown organics that i am convinced of, is that you are assured they are non-genetically modified. many of the pesticides used by organics producers are just as toxic, if not moreso, than convential chemicals. just because it's "natural", doesn't mean it's safer. i wish diderot were here. he had the low-down on the down-low with this stuff.
 

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Bravo, oat.

I always go organic when there's an option. The only time I notice a severe difference in price is with certain fresh produce, and I'm trying to get in the habit of getting that at organic farmer's markets, especially considering produce is the one thing I buy more than once a week anyway (as a separate trip from my main provisions run).
 
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