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I just read that a day or two ago too. I think if buying a lot of fresh produce it will be. Just listened to 2 of Michael Pollan's hour long lectures on Youtube today, and the carbon footprint per kilocalorie is exceptionally high for some foods, like bagged lettuce mixes in the winter, when they are traveling a thousand miles.... he talked about the price of the item and the carbon footprints on some other foods too. also if the grain farmers, dairy, beef industries weren't subsidized, people wouldn't be able to afford meat.

Frozen veggies gives a good value too. In this day and age, people need to know or learn how to cook....a bag of beans for example is much cheaper than buying canned beans.

That article along with his lectures were very good, although I didn't agree with his view on nutrition science.
 

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Where this argument falls down is with snack foods, rather than meals: for example an apple in the UK costs anything from 20p (in a supermarket value bag) - 70p, whereas 10 small chocolate bars can be bought for £1. So if you want to give your kids a snack after or in between mealtimes, a bar of chocolate is far cheaper.

I agree that when it comes to eating out, McD's are far more expensive that making a meal: however the skill of cooking is no longer taught in schools or at home - most people think that cooking a meal involves putting a ready meal into the microwave!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by angie54321 View Post

Where this argument falls down is with snack foods, rather than meals: for example an apple in the UK costs anything from 20p (in a supermarket value bag) - 70p, whereas 10 small chocolate bars can be bought for £1. So if you want to give your kids a snack after or in between mealtimes, a bar of chocolate is far cheaper.

I agree that when it comes to eating out, McD's are far more expensive that making a meal: however the skill of cooking is no longer taught in schools or at home - most people think that cooking a meal involves putting a ready meal into the microwave!
you're so right!
 

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Originally Posted by angie54321 View Post

Where this argument falls down is with snack foods, rather than meals: for example an apple in the UK costs anything from 20p (in a supermarket value bag) - 70p, whereas 10 small chocolate bars can be bought for £1. So if you want to give your kids a snack after or in between mealtimes, a bar of chocolate is far cheaper.

I agree that when it comes to eating out, McD's are far more expensive that making a meal: however the skill of cooking is no longer taught in schools or at home - most people think that cooking a meal involves putting a ready meal into the microwave!
Yes deffinatly. Just because you're eating junk doesn't mean you're eating takeaways.

I just graced the iceland website, and found 20 sausages for £1.50, 8 beef burgers for £1, 1.8kg of chips for £1, a LOT of ready meals for £1 each, pizzas for a pound, sainsburys basics crisps for 85p for 12 bags, sainsburys basics chocolate for 32p per 100g... there's just no way healthy homecooked food can rival that.

Even if you can come up with a handful of meals that could at least compete with such prices (made from cheap vegetables and beans) to provide a variety of 3 meals a day and snacks for prices that can compete with cheap junk food, I think it would be impossible - not to mention that for most people, they'd also want to include good quality meat.
 

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Originally Posted by Identity_thief View Post

Yes deffinatly. Just because you're eating junk doesn't mean you're eating takeaways.

I just graced the iceland website, and found 20 sausages for £1.50, 8 beef burgers for £1, 1.8kg of chips for £1, a LOT of ready meals for £1 each, pizzas for a pound, sainsburys basics crisps for 85p for 12 bags, sainsburys basics chocolate for 32p per 100g... there's just no way healthy homecooked food can rival that.

Even if you can come up with a handful of meals that could at least compete with such prices (made from cheap vegetables and beans) to provide a variety of 3 meals a day and snacks for prices that can compete with cheap junk food, I think it would be impossible - not to mention that for most people, they'd also want to include good quality meat.
The last time I went into an Iceland store, I had to go up 4 aisles before I found the frozen vegetables - the rest was ready meals, meat and junk in every possible permutation. Out of about 30 freezers, they only had one with vegetables in!

And I notice Tesco are giving more and more space to ready meals, fresh and frozen. They now have a whole aisle in my local store dedicated to frozen potato products alone. Which is more than they have for vegetables


Talking of Tesco, did you see the news about their supposed 'big price drop'? The Grocer magazine does a weekly comparison between the main supermarkets, checking the prices of about 30 different products that most people would buy on a weekly/fortnightly basis; and found that the Tesco total had gone UP by £1.54!! Every little helps, as Tesco like to say, helping themselves to even more of our money
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Identity_thief View Post

Yes deffinatly. Just because you're eating junk doesn't mean you're eating takeaways.

I just graced the iceland website, and found 20 sausages for £1.50, 8 beef burgers for £1, 1.8kg of chips for £1, a LOT of ready meals for £1 each, pizzas for a pound, sainsburys basics crisps for 85p for 12 bags, sainsburys basics chocolate for 32p per 100g... there's just no way healthy homecooked food can rival that.

Even if you can come up with a handful of meals that could at least compete with such prices (made from cheap vegetables and beans) to provide a variety of 3 meals a day and snacks for prices that can compete with cheap junk food, I think it would be impossible - not to mention that for most people, they'd also want to include good quality meat.
 

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The big fail in most of these comparisons are that prepared junk foods are compared to prepared healthy food. Thats why many health agencies lament the 'fact' that 'healthy' food is expensive, the board members are looking at bags of kale chips and goji berry smoothies. I never eat the prepackaged trendy 'healthy' foods in the stores but I do see the prices, theyre priced like trendy luxury goods for the upper middle class. The reason the referenced article contradicts the normal perception is that it compares junk food to home cooked, thats all. I wonder what the comparison would be if one were to make big macs from scratch at home versus a big pot of vegetarian borscht.
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Originally Posted by angie54321 View Post

...most people think that cooking a meal involves putting a ready meal into the microwave!
And this will likely emerge as a major explanation for the skyrocketing rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and dementia.
The last living person in my family to really cook was my great grandmother who lived to 104. All subsequent relatives think 'cooking' is putting a plastic lined box of mostly meat and dairy in the microwave, or at the outer extreme- preparing tuna helper.
Buying fresh veggies to cook with may in fact cost more than buying prepackaged junk food in some instances, but its worth it given the outcome.
 

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Originally Posted by Auxin View Post

The big fail in most of these comparisons are that prepared junk foods are compared to prepared healthy food. Thats why many health agencies lament the 'fact' that 'healthy' food is expensive, the board members are looking at bags of kale chips and goji berry smoothies. I never eat the prepackaged trendy 'healthy' foods in the stores but I do see the prices, theyre priced like trendy luxury goods for the upper middle class. The reason the referenced article contradicts the normal perception is that it compares junk food to home cooked, thats all. I wonder what the comparison would be if one were to make big macs from scratch at home versus a big pot of vegetarian borscht.

And this will likely emerge as a major explanation for the skyrocketing rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and dementia.
The last living person in my family to really cook was my great grandmother who lived to 104. All subsequent relatives think 'cooking' is putting a plastic lined box of mostly meat and dairy in the microwave, or at the outer extreme- preparing tuna helper.
Buying fresh veggies to cook with may in fact cost more than buying prepackaged junk food in some instances, but its worth it given the outcome.
In the UK my generation (those from their late 30's to early 50's were the last to learn to cook properly at school and at home. Unfortunately for a variety of reasons the skills have not been passed down to the next generation. School cookery lessons for my children involved making cakes (which is great fun when they are very young, not so good when they are 13) and 'cooking' pizzas - which involved bringing in a ready made base purchased from the supermarket, and a ready made sauce purchased from the supermarket, and some toppings, including cheese. It became a lesson in assembling ready prepared food items, rather than cooking. The closest they got to cooking in this lesson was grating the cheese for the top of the pizza.

I was extremely fortunate that my mother not only taught me to cook from scratch, but she was also a 'crank': my lunchbox at school held home-made wholemeal bread sandwiches (this was in the late 1960's and wholemeal bread was not mainstream at all, and as for homemade bread - everyone had just discovered white sliced bread, so that's what they all had), with a piece of fruit and a small container of nuts. We were not vegetarian at the time, but looking back, my lunch was far healthier than my school friends. So I was been set up with healthy eating patterns from the start.

However I think although a lot of my age group who can cook take the easy option and have ready meals, going from the the contents of the trolleys I see in the supermarket. This of course leads to their offspring doing the same. It is difficult to see how to change this. There is an abundance of cookery programmes on our TV stations, but most people prefer to watch, rather than do. And the most popular at the moment seems to be 'The Great British Bake Off' which involves cooking mainly cakes and pies - hardly healthy food!

I think both the USA and the UK are now seeing the results of this inability or reluctance to cook properly with sky-rocketing obesity and the consequential illnesses.
 

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Originally Posted by angie54321 View Post

I think both the USA and the UK are now seeing the results of this inability or reluctance to cook properly with sky-rocketing obesity and the consequential illnesses.
In this case however, poverty can not be ignored. Obesity is a problem mainly in the lower income groups (especially in the USA) because in comparison to healthy foods, junk is much, much cheaper. You can blame them for not ''wanting'' to cook a proper meal from a comfortable situation, but when the choice is between feeding the whole family or not, there is no choice but to eat junk for most of these people. Besides, many people in the USA who don't have much money work more hours than those who have money (they often have two jobs just to come around) so they honestly don't have the time to roam the supermarkets and cook. In order to really help these people, work has to be done to eliminate poverty or make healthy foods cheaper..
 

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Originally Posted by Windigo View Post

In this case however, poverty can not be ignored. Obesity is a problem mainly in the lower income groups (especially in the USA) because in comparison to healthy foods, junk is much, much cheaper. You can blame them for not ''wanting'' to cook a proper meal from a comfortable situation, but when the choice is between feeding the whole family or not, there is no choice but to eat junk for most of these people. Besides, many people in the USA who don't have much money work more hours than those who have money (they often have two jobs just to come around) so they honestly don't have the time to roam the supermarkets and cook. In order to really help these people, work has to be done to eliminate poverty or make healthy foods cheaper..
Yes - the article I linked to above made me think, and my opinion has altered. The comments are better than the article: pointing out that you need a car to access the grocery stores who have the cheapest fruit and veg. Although we are a much smaller country, I regularly see people taking taxis home from our local supermarket - they obviously do not have access to a car, and have too much to carry on public transport (or the buses do not go near their house). Buying fresh fruit and vegetables that will start to deteriorate within a few days is not a good choice for them, economically. So they stock up on cheap canned meals, and frozen ready meals. Their local shops mainly stock cheap junk food, with overpriced (and often past its best) fruit and vegetables.
 

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Originally Posted by Windigo View Post

In this case however, poverty can not be ignored. Obesity is a problem mainly in the lower income groups (especially in the USA) because in comparison to healthy foods, junk is much, much cheaper. You can blame them for not ''wanting'' to cook a proper meal from a comfortable situation, but when the choice is between feeding the whole family or not, there is no choice but to eat junk for most of these people. Besides, many people in the USA who don't have much money work more hours than those who have money (they often have two jobs just to come around) so they honestly don't have the time to roam the supermarkets and cook. In order to really help these people, work has to be done to eliminate poverty or make healthy foods cheaper..
that is well said Windigo.
 

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Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

that is well said Windigo.
Thanks
I read a lot about this topic, that why I felt I had to add something.
 
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