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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Noelson</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hey SnowNose, I liked your old avatar better <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/sad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":("></div>
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which one? the elephant? or the puppy?<br><br><br><br>
I decided to change it cus the old one was bad quality.<br><br>
but i can always change it back!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Ok, a friend told about a vermicomposting farm in my area. I assume they are local worms. I'm going to contact them and ask them to inspect my box, and decide how many worms I will need. If the worms overproduce, I will get a bigger box (I'm gong to check with the worm farmers about appropriate boxes), and if it gets really out of hand, I'll see if I can't bring them back to the farm, where they can run free in the fields.
 

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Once the weather warms up a bit, why not go out at night and gently dig up some worms of your own? If you don't have a yard, ask the landlord if you can dig on the grounds of the complex, or find a friendly neighbor.<br><br><br><br>
Bear in mind I know nothing about composting, so tell me if this is a stupid idea, folks.
 

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I seem to remember reading about this in the university library many years ago. I think I'm right in saying that the worms will regulate their own population by reducing breeding once there is an "optimum" number of worms in a given area - i.e. your composter.<br><br><br><br>
In the UK at least, Wiggly Wigglers sell worms and wormeries and I believe they sell native (to Britain) species of worms. Think I'll nip to their site and have a look...
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Morna</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Once the weather warms up a bit, why not go out at night and gently dig up some worms of your own? If you don't have a yard, ask the landlord if you can dig on the grounds of the complex, or find a friendly neighbor.<br><br><br><br>
Bear in mind I know nothing about composting, so tell me if this is a stupid idea, folks.</div>
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Regular earthworms don't convert kitchen waste into soil. They eat soil itself-- stuff that has already been converted into soil. To do vermicomposting, you need a different type of worm.
 

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<a href="http://journeytoforever.org/compost_worm.html" target="_blank">http://journeytoforever.org/compost_worm.html</a>
 

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Hippymama, your thread gives me a warm squishy wormy fuzz to think that people actually consider things like this <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Overall, I don't think there is anything wrong with setting up a true symbiotic environment with any species (they help you; you help them). But I wanted to raise a different point. If you purchase worms form a commercial worm-seller, isn't that the same as if you were to buy dogs from a breeder?Depending on your stance on breeding, this may be a significant point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>DeflatorMouse</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hippymama, your thread gives me a warm squishy wormy fuzz to think that people actually consider things like this <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"><br><br><br><br>
Overall, I don't think there is anything wrong with setting up a true symbiotic environment with any species (they help you; you help them). But I wanted to raise a different point. If you purchase worms form a commercial worm-seller, isn't that the same as if you were to buy dogs from a breeder?Depending on your stance on breeding, this may be a significant point.</div>
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I'm glad that I was able to supply some warm fuzzies. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> I find captive animal and pets disturbing (always have) and this feel a bit like that. It's easy to say that they are well cared for and happy, but I wonder if the animals would really agree. I don't care how nicely my DH takes care of me, if he never let me out of the house, I would NOT be happy, kwim?<br><br><br><br><br><br>
I don't think vericomposting is quite the same as commercial breeding. If as previous poster stated, worms will self regulate their breeding, then there is no real danger of overbreeding. Also, I doubt the worms are being artificially inseminated or forced to mate, as is done with cattle and dogs. My biggest concern with commercial breeding of pets is that there are so many unwanted pets being put to death because they don't have the proper lineage. I'd rather adopt a pet slotted for death than puchase one that was created specificly for sale. (though my kitties all came from private pet shelters that don't kill).
 

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hehe I can see it now:<br><br>
"Worm overpopulation! Spay/neuter your worms!!" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/grin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=":D"> You're right. In the practical sense, worm breeding can't screw up the world. But I was just thinking of the philosophy of creating life for commercial gain. (I assume the worm farms are trying to make some sort of profit.)
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Tesseract</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Regular earthworms don't convert kitchen waste into soil. They eat soil itself-- stuff that has already been converted into soil. To do vermicomposting, you need a different type of worm.</div>
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This is a good point. Presence of earthworms is an indicator for a good compost tip. They don't necessarily turn compost good by being introduced to the tip. They feed off of the remains of the tail end of the composting process. They don't, actually, "eat soil," but the nutriments within the dirt.<br><br><br><br>
Presence of earthworms is good, even if they are introduced. They will leave if circumstances are not appropriate, and aid in the breakdown of the overall mass when times are good. When they are relocated to the garden with compost they contribute to aeration and distribution of nutrients in the soil.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>nigel</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
TThey don't, actually, "eat soil," but the nutriments within the dirt.</div>
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[biology nerd] Admittedly, it's been a while since I studied zoology, but I'm pretty sure earthworms literally do eat dirt. They digest a certain amount of organic nutrients from it, then excrete the rest in the form of castings. [/biology nerd]
 

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I think it's nice you are concerned...the world needs more people like you. I think the worms will be happy there. They like composting and so long as they are well fed they should be ok!!!
 

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I think a good compost bin fulfills a worm's wishes in life (no drowning, freezing, or being eaten, and lots of good food) nicely. A couple tips, from my experience - they don't like peppers, even bell peppers, or citrus, and they <i>love love love</i> mango pits!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>ElizabethN</strong> <a href="/forum/post/0"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
I think a good compost bin fulfills a worm's wishes in life (no drowning, freezing, or being eaten, and lots of good food) nicely. A couple tips, from my experience - they don't like peppers, even bell peppers, or citrus, and they <i>love love love</i> mango pits!</div>
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C'mon now. How do you know they don't like peppers and citrus?<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/images/smilies/wink3.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title=";)">
 
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