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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I definitely see why some people are completely against it, but unless it is insanely oily or greasy I don't have that big of an issue. I eat veggie burgers made at Burger King on the same grill as whoppers, and I take pepperoni off of pizza (if there is no cheese or any other meal alternatives). I just don't see it being THAT big of a deal. I am making this thread to hear other opinions and to get more insight. I'm not looking for you to change my mind, but I welcome it at the same time.
 

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I do the same as you taking the meat toppings off the pizza. I'm getting together w/ friends for dinner and the one who is cooking said she would make my veggies on a separate grill from the meat/chicken for me. I though that was unnecessary but interested in someone else's take on it too. I am new to the veg world.
 

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No. Same as you, I have no problem with it unless the utensils they use are grossly oily or greasy. But I make it a point to not visit omni shops unless necessary
 

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I don't really care about the grill thing...unless there is lots of grease. I only ate pizza once where i picked off the meat, it was nasty. I could still taste the ham on it. I never pick the meat off/out of anything now. If the only option is picking the meat out of something I'll just wait till I get home to eat.
 

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I prefer to not pick it off if it has been "cooked together", meaning that sandwiches and salads are often fair game.
 

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Hmm I think there is a big difference between picking meat off a pizza and using a grill that is the same as a grill that cooks meat.<br><br>
For me, a huge part (although, not the only part) of being vegetarian (and indeed vegan) is not creating a demand for products I consider unethical. For me, meat is unethical, and if I buy (or encourage the buying of, ie: by eating something someone else has bought) a product with meat in, I'm encouraging the production of meat by creating a demand. Whether I eat the meat or not, doesn't really make a difference, as far as consumerism goes. I've created a demand for pepperoni pizza, even if I didn't eat the pepperoni. Does that make sense?<br><br>
But using the same grill as meat products doesn't create a demand. It's just cross-contamination. If I keep eating veggie burgers cooked with meat burgers, it doesn't result in an increased demand of meat burgers (but it does of veggie burgers! which is good). I understand why people don't want to eat them, but for me, that isn't really an ethical thing - it's a personal thing. Like, it just grosses some people out, or whatever.<br><br>
So, in my mind, if I'm eating something where meat is an ingrediant, I'm creating a demand for meat. If I'm eating something that's been contaminated with meat products, I'm not. That's where I draw the ethical line. Sometimes I might not want to eat something cross contaminated for "ick" reasons - not usually, but if something was contaiminated to the point it tasted meaty I wouldn't want it.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Identity_thief</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3012247"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hmm I think there is a big difference between picking meat off a pizza and using a grill that is the same as a grill that cooks meat.<br><br>
For me, a huge part (although, not the only part) of being vegetarian (and indeed vegan) is not creating a demand for products I consider unethical. For me, meat is unethical, and if I buy (or encourage the buying of, ie: by eating something someone else has bought) a product with meat in, I'm encouraging the production of meat by creating a demand. Whether I eat the meat or not, doesn't really make a difference, as far as consumerism goes. I've created a demand for pepperoni pizza, even if I didn't eat the pepperoni. Does that make sense?<br><br>
But using the same grill as meat products doesn't create a demand. It's just cross-contamination. If I keep eating veggie burgers cooked with meat burgers, it doesn't result in an increased demand of meat burgers (but it does of veggie burgers! which is good). I understand why people don't want to eat them, but for me, that isn't really an ethical thing - it's a personal thing. Like, it just grosses some people out, or whatever.<br><br>
So, in my mind, if I'm eating something where meat is an ingrediant, I'm creating a demand for meat. If I'm eating something that's been contaminated with meat products, I'm not. That's where I draw the ethical line. Sometimes I might not want to eat something cross contaminated for "ick" reasons - not usually, but if something was contaiminated to the point it tasted meaty I wouldn't want it.</div>
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Completely agree!<br>
I don't really mind about the same grill being used, but it would be nice if it was different. I went to our local chippy and the chips tasted like fish, they were fried in the same vat. Never went back... disgusting.<br><br>
As for picking meat off pizzas, I think that's still supporting the meat trade, it may be going in the bin not your gullet, but you still bought it, you are still supporting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In my 8 months as veg I've probably only ever done it 3 or 4 times. Only when there is no other food like say at a party or something. When it comes down to Pizza or chips and I haven't eaten anything, I'm going with the pizza.
 

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When a pizza is cooked with pepperoni or other meat, the meat juice gets all over the pizza, so you're really eating some of the meat fat even if you pick it off.<br><br>
As for grilling, I'm not concerned with my stuff being cooked on the same grill as meat. It happens in probably every restaurant that offers veggie options. However, at a family cookout, for example, I might make a point of scraping or cleaning the grill before cooking my stuff. Even so, some grills have juice from previous cookings that can drip off the lid if they're not cleaned well. I guess it's just a matter of where you wanna draw the line, personally.
 

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I think part of it depends on your reasons for being veg. Some people who are veg heavily for AR, would not eat something that meat has ever touched. However, some people are brought to vegetarianism for health reasons, and in that case, I don't think it has as much of an effect.
 

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I don't pick meat off of pizza or any other food, but I do eat things cooked on the same grill or deep fryer or whatever. Especially living in an omni family, I'm not going to go trough all the trouble of separating things, wastin oil by refilling the deep fryer every time I deep fry, etc., and I eat at restaurants that have omni food so I'm sure there's some cross contamination but I don't care as long as the dish itself is fine.
 

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I have picked meat toppings off pizza in the past, but I don't do it anymore and haven't for quite a while. I wouldn't fault a veg*n for doing that if there were no alternative. (even though nowadays I'd rather just not eat anything) You do have to be careful about doing that sort of thing since the meat can get stuck in (and sometimes under) the cheese. It just depends on what you're comfortable with. As someone else pointed out, you're still consuming the meat juice, so that's definitely something to consider. I would encourage you to move away from picking meat off/out of food, but everyone has to do things at their own pace.
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Identity_thief</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3012247"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hmm I think there is a big difference between picking meat off a pizza and using a grill that is the same as a grill that cooks meat.<br><br>
For me, a huge part (although, not the only part) of being vegetarian (and indeed vegan) is not creating a demand for products I consider unethical. For me, meat is unethical, and if I buy (or encourage the buying of, ie: by eating something someone else has bought) a product with meat in, I'm encouraging the production of meat by creating a demand. Whether I eat the meat or not, doesn't really make a difference, as far as consumerism goes. I've created a demand for pepperoni pizza, even if I didn't eat the pepperoni. Does that make sense?<br><br>
But using the same grill as meat products doesn't create a demand. It's just cross-contamination. If I keep eating veggie burgers cooked with meat burgers, it doesn't result in an increased demand of meat burgers (but it does of veggie burgers! which is good). I understand why people don't want to eat them, but for me, that isn't really an ethical thing - it's a personal thing. Like, it just grosses some people out, or whatever.<br><br>
So, in my mind, if I'm eating something where meat is an ingrediant, I'm creating a demand for meat. If I'm eating something that's been contaminated with meat products, I'm not. That's where I draw the ethical line. Sometimes I might not want to eat something cross contaminated for "ick" reasons - not usually, but if something was contaiminated to the point it tasted meaty I wouldn't want it.</div>
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^This and this:<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Darth Zucchini</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3012444"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
When a pizza is cooked with pepperoni or other meat, the meat juice gets all over the pizza, so you're really eating some of the meat fat even if you pick it off.<br><br>
As for grilling, I'm not concerned with my stuff being cooked on the same grill as meat. It happens in probably every restaurant that offers veggie options. However, at a family cookout, for example, I might make a point of scraping or cleaning the grill before cooking my stuff. Even so, some grills have juice from previous cookings that can drip off the lid if they're not cleaned well. I guess it's just a matter of where you wanna draw the line, personally.</div>
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I don't pick meat off of things (pizza, salads, sandwiches), and I prefer a clean place on the grill, but that is not always up to me. I'm far more flexible with the latter.
 

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Yes. This makes you a very bad person indeed.
 

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I think I'm on board with most others here that for myself I don't mind cross contamination in kitchens as much as I mind picking meat out of/off of things. Personally, I wouldn't do the second. Eating something that's been cooked with meat gives it the flavor and jusices/grease/etc of meat, which to me makes it really gross. I'm not bothered by cross-contamination in cooking (barring of course raw meat touching things meant to be eaten raw for safety reasons) because I know that sometimes it's unavoidable. I don't expect an employee in restaurant to clean off a grill for me in the middle of a meal rush, and I think asking them to do so would probably end up with my food getting spit in. On top of that, I generally already order a regular meal item sans meat products, and asking them to change the recipe AND cook it specially would make me feel like I'm being too demanding. As for you being "bad" for taking meat off of things or eating meat cooked near other items, it's all about comfort level. I can completely understand why in a social situation one would do those things, and as long as it doesn't bother you at all I can't imagine why it would make you a "bad person". The only issues I could imagine would be if you're paying for an item with meat, then removing it because then you're spending your money on and supporting the meat industry (thought this really only seems a problem if you're veg*n for ethical reasons), or that possibly an acquaintance could understand that you're a veg*n, and observe you removing the meat from an item to eat it, and then assume that all veg*ns do the same, which could cause an issue if later on they meat someone who is veg*n and would not do that.<br><br>
Tl;dr: Eating doesn't have laws, if you're comfortable with doing that then go ahead!
 

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<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Identity_thief</strong> <a href="/forum/post/3012247"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style=""></a><br><br>
Hmm I think there is a big difference between picking meat off a pizza and using a grill that is the same as a grill that cooks meat.<br><br>
For me, a huge part (although, not the only part) of being vegetarian (and indeed vegan) is not creating a demand for products I consider unethical. For me, meat is unethical, and if I buy (or encourage the buying of, ie: by eating something someone else has bought) a product with meat in, I'm encouraging the production of meat by creating a demand. Whether I eat the meat or not, doesn't really make a difference, as far as consumerism goes. I've created a demand for pepperoni pizza, even if I didn't eat the pepperoni. Does that make sense?<br><br>
But using the same grill as meat products doesn't create a demand. It's just cross-contamination. If I keep eating veggie burgers cooked with meat burgers, it doesn't result in an increased demand of meat burgers (but it does of veggie burgers! which is good). I understand why people don't want to eat them, but for me, that isn't really an ethical thing - it's a personal thing. Like, it just grosses some people out, or whatever.<br><br>
So, in my mind, if I'm eating something where meat is an ingrediant, I'm creating a demand for meat. If I'm eating something that's been contaminated with meat products, I'm not. That's where I draw the ethical line. Sometimes I might not want to eat something cross contaminated for "ick" reasons - not usually, but if something was contaiminated to the point it tasted meaty I wouldn't want it.</div>
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I agree with that as well. Although I'm fairly new at playing the "avoiding meat in public situations" game, i've unconsciously made this same view. If something has meat in or on it already and you pick it out, then you're still "consuming" meat, in that you will be throwing it away or giving a friend extra meat to eat. That animal part is still being killed in order to be on/in your food. I hope that makes sense to everyone else.
 

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I have never picked the meat off anything and I won't. I don't want to perpetuate the idea of "why don't you just pick it off" but I also don't want to cause meat to be bought for any reason. If the meat has been bought, the demand has been made and picking it off isn't going to change what the food industries see.<br><br>
If I'm in a social situation and there is nothing to eat without meat, I won't eat anything. This was my lifestyle choice.<br><br>
Luckily I am very vocal to my friends when we are doing something to make sure that I have something available or I'll offer to bring my own food if necessary. Or I'll eat before.
 

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I do not worry about meat being cooked on the same grill my non-meat food. I have only been a vegetarian for 2 months, and I have picked meat off of things twice. The first time, my husband cooked spaghetti and meatballs and thought I would be okay just not eating the meatballs. He was trying really hard to deal with my new vegetarianism, so I ate it, but asked him nicely not to do that again. The second time was a work function. I was there with my boss and several co-workers. The meal offerings were turkey sandwiches, roast beef sandwiches, chicken salad sandwiches or tuna salad sandwiches. I took a turkey sandwich and took the meat and cheese off - leaving me with a lettuce and tomato sandwich. I had only been vegetarian for about a week and did not want to make a big deal about it in front of my co-workers. If I was in the same situation today, I would not eat at all. I think my tolerance for picking meat off of things is getting smaller by the day.
 

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It didn't used to bother me, but now it does.
 
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