VeggieBoards banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
kelp! i put powdered sea kelp into many things. the key is to use a tiny amount. otherwise it can make your food taste kind of muddy. 1/4 tsp or less in a pot of soup or a lsmoothy or a loaf of bread or a dip or sauce is totally sufficient. just have some every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just read that iodine is in a lot of soy products (and also chocolate and molasses)...but I don't see it listed on anything I have. How can I tell if it is really in there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use none processed salt crystals, (looks like rock salt)

It is not iodized.

I thought about using sea salt, but I read that can have murcury etc..(because of how humans have poluted the oceans)

So, I need to get iodine from other sources, not salt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
KELP!


(am i talking to myself here?)

you can get it at any self-respecting HFS!

also, where did you hear about sea salt containing mercury? do you have a link to that info? i use non-iodized sea salt exclusively in my cooking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry, no link. I read it a few years ago and took the information with a grain of salt, you might say.


Yet, I was just playing it safe.

I read so much conflicting information all the time.

As for Kelp...I appreciate the suggestion, yet I am not one to remember to take a vitamin or add nutrients to my food everyday.

I was hoping to find iodine in a food that I am already eating (I am sure it's there) it is just this B6 thing that has me questioning everything today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,049 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by mushroom

As for Kelp...I appreciate the suggestion, yet I am not one to remember to take a vitamin or add nutrients to my food everyday.

I was hoping to find iodine in a food that I am already eating (I am sure it's there) it is just this B6 thing that has me questioning everything today.
well iodine can be naturally present in a lot of foods, especially those that are touched by or grown in sea water.

i keep my powdered kelp in a little spice shaker. i add it like i would add salt or pepper to a dish. it's not that hard to remember.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,691 Posts
i found this...

"Iodized salt is the primary food source of iodine. Iodine is also widely available in seafood; cod, sea bass, haddock, and perch are good sources. Kelp is the most common vegetable seafood that is a rich source of iodine. Dairy products and plants grown in soil that is rich in iodine are also good sources."

here: http://www.1uphealth.com/health/iodi...t_sources.html

and this...

"Kelp is sometimes supplemented as a source of iodine, however it also contains bromine, whereby

the iodine / bromine ratio will ultimately determine its beneficial or adverse effect on someone's thyroid.

Some people develop an acne-like skin condition as a result of consuming iodine-containing foods,

but the culprit may well be bromine (which is usually present as well), and not necessarily the iodine.

Iodine Sources:

Seafood, shellfish, fish liver oils, seaweed,

sunflower seeds,
iodized table salt. "

here: http://www.acu-cell.com/sni.html

the above site also says

"Goiter can develop after consuming large amounts of goitrogenic foods that interfere with iodine uptake

and/or thyroid metabolism. These foods, known as "goitrogens," include brussels sprouts, lima beans,

cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, cassava, and nitrate-rich food sources.

In some parts of the world, there are still cases emerging where children, as a result of ingesting large

amounts of goitrogenic foods, end up with mental retardation, which could have been prevented with iodine supplementation. On a similar note, heavy, regular consumption of soy products, because of their phyto-estrogenic properties, can also have a significant (depressing) impact on thyroid functions."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
Good sources are dried seaweeds like nori, wakame, hiziki, and other, which are avaible at Asian stores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I knocked my TSH count from a budding 3.15 to 1/2 that with just a total of a few tablespoons of kelp and 2 packages of dried seaweed sticks consumed over the space of a month or two. Anything over 3 is now considered abnormally high by the american assoc of clinical endocrinologists. for background information: www.aace.com

Anyone who oevereats or is malnourished ought take seaweed food products as mentioned above and also sushi. The midwestern region used to be known as the goiter belt, but goiter is not limited to the midwest.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top