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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm wondering what you look for when you look for say...a vegan bread. As long as it doesn't have the obvious - milk, eggs, or honey what other ingredients do you stay away from? I know sometimes there is concern over what type of monoglycerides or diglycerides are used... I guess thus far I mainly look at the allergen warning to see if it has any obvious ingredients but after that my mind boggles a little bit.
Also, do you know of any common bread brands that are safe? I've seen the list of "non-vegan" ingredients commonly in products but I'm wondering what most people do when looking at labels. What do you focus on? I feel like veganism has been pretty simple thus far...but I'm wondering if it's because I'm missing things. I wish that everything that meets vegan standards whether they're trying to or not had to be labeled!!
 

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I avoid breads with HFCS and/or partially-hydrogenated oils. They make lousy toast, worse grilled sandwiches and collapse into a gummy mess at the touch of softened Earth Balance or natural peanut butter. I look for a 4-5 item list of ingredients: flour(s), water, yeast, salt.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ductapemyheartt View Post

Honestly, I ususally just go for Ezekiel bread. Easy.
I resorted to making my own bread for a while... but it sucks. Someone on here recommended Ezekiel bread... and I've never looked back. I have a loaf in my fridge now.

It's DATEM that shows up in otherwise vegan breads.

WTF?!?!?!
I was going to link to Wikipedia's DATEM entry...but it has changed. I specifically remember being heartbroken when I first read about DATEM on Wiki, and how it comes from animal sources. But here, it says its made with soya bean oil?!?!?!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DATEM
This article implies that commercial DATEM is vegan... Umm... Am I being horribly misled here?
 

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Yeah, as far as I could tell DATEM is vegan (or, "typically vegan"). I don't sweat the chemical sounding names. I watch out for the big ones -- milk, whey, egg, buttermilk, etc That is hard enough in itself -- why do so many breads contain whey! Often as the very last ingredient!

I do prefer to bake my own bread when I can (bread in 5 minutes a day method) - I know it's fresh and it tastes so much better.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ductapemyheartt View Post

Honestly, I ususally just go for Ezekiel bread. Easy.
Me too.
I actually preferred this even before I was vegan, just for health reasons. It's the least processed bread you can buy.
 

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I imagine it must be very similar in the US, here in Aus, i have to not only check the obvious ingredients, but also what they call emulsifiers, you will see normally numbers like 427, etc. Some of them actually have animal content. And I always check at preservatives.
But for the last 4 months or so I have been making my own bread, its the best way to know what its going into it.
I can not advise on brands for obvious reasons.
 

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Watch out for L-cysteine as well. There is a vegan version, but honestly, no one uses it. So if you see l-cysteine in the ingredients list, drop it and move to the next.

Everything from Rubschlager is vegan. Trader Joe's has many vegan breads (some are labeled with the V) and other products, I'm sure Whole Foods does as well. Ezekiel is great, as previously mentioned. Every sourdough bread I've ever checked was vegan, but always make sure by reading the ingredients yourself. A lot of store bakeries make some breads that are vegan, but always check because not all do. Egg, dairy and mono and diglycerides is what I normally see in the ones that aren't. A lot of breads/bread products from ethnic companies are vegan (normally only 5 ingredients, if that).

Something I read from someone that apparently read this in their local newspaper a while back, that yeast culturing is started by enzymes from animals' pancreas (most likely remains from the meat and dairy industries). I've tried to find some source for this but every form of words I searched showed absolutely nothing. I won't believe it until I see some evidence, but crazier things have happened and are true, so who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the tips. I tried Ezekiel bread before too. It just suck since my boyfriend and I go through a decent amount of bread (everymorning with peanut butter...making our own garlic bread...etc) and it gets expensive. But I suppose how often we eat it should just be another reason to make sure the stuff we're eating is quality and vegan. We have been meaning to take a trip to a Trader Joes for so long because they do label so much of their stuff. The closest one though is over an hour away


Puppet Master, what is not vegan about L-cysteine? I'll have to keep an eye out because it sounds like a familiar ingredient.

That's what I would do ideally would be make my own bread....except the two times I've tried I have failed miserably! We don't have a bread maker and really no room for one either so that really limits the recipes we can use to try to make bread. Does anyone make their bread without a bread maker and have a good recipe that works well for them? And any tips that might make me successful at making it haha.
 

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L-Cysteine is a used as a dough conditioner, and is made from bird feathers.

Many of Arnold's breads are vegan, although you have to watch out for added D3 apparently. I use the whole wheat light, and it's one that is ok-no D3 added. Their mono and diglycerides are not animal derived, and you just have to read the labels on the packages, as some contain whey or honey, and some don't.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovemyarchnug View Post

That's what I would do ideally would be make my own bread....except the two times I've tried I have failed miserably! We don't have a bread maker and really no room for one either so that really limits the recipes we can use to try to make bread. Does anyone make their bread without a bread maker and have a good recipe that works well for them? And any tips that might make me successful at making it haha.
Here is a great recipe for white bread - if you peruse their site, you'll also find some whole grain recipes (not everything is vegan, but many are). It's really easy, but you will need a big container (at least 5 qts) if you make a full recipe. No bread machine, no kneading. Cut the recipe in half or quarter if you don't have a big enough bowl or enough fridge space to store the dough. There are some other threads here about the "bread in 5" books, I think, but I don't have time to search for them right now.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

L-Cysteine is a used as a dough conditioner, and is made from bird feathers.

Many of Arnold's breads are vegan, although you have to watch out for added D3 apparently. I use the whole wheat light, and it's one that is ok-no D3 added. Their mono and diglycerides are not animal derived, and you just have to read the labels on the packages, as some contain whey or honey, and some don't.
Yeah, I was going to mention Arnold's. Generally speaking, the kosher breads that intentionally cater to the Jewish community are dairy free. This is because kosher rules don't allow eating dairy and meat together, and most omni Jews want to make meat sandwiches out of their bread, so it has to be totally dairy free.

--Fromper
 

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I've never heard of ezykiel or datem.i eat aunt millies butter top wheat and the only butter is what they put on top. I'm considering writing them and asking them to stop with the butter
 

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I have a bread mAker and kitchenaid and it's still slot of work to make my own. (5 kids)
 

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Originally Posted by ebonyvegetarian View Post

I've never heard of ezykiel or datem.i eat aunt millies butter top wheat and the only butter is what they put on top. I'm considering writing them and asking them to stop with the butter
Don't they make any other varieties? It seems silly to buy a bread with butter in the name, and then ask the company to start making it without the butter. Is this the bread: Butter top wheat? If so, it also contains whey, but they seem to make a ton of other varieties. Try this one: 100% whole wheat -- looks vegan (has natural flavors, but you could write and ask if those are vegan).
 

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Originally Posted by GreenNEasy View Post

I generally make my own. That way I know exactly what goes in it. Hot, fresh bread = NOM.
This is what I've resorted to also. Otherwise its difficult and often expensive to avoid known food toxins.
Azodicarbonamide is so well known as a food toxin that its illegal across 1/3 of planet earth and yet its in more and more american breads. Other very common additives are known or implicated as causes of kidney damage, heart fibrosis, neurological damage, heart disease, and cancer.
Making your own is really pretty easy, especially with a bread machine on the 'dough' setting. I have one recipe for bread, another for breakfast rolls, and another for little curry bread snack balls that somehow evolved from a bread-cookie recipe, lol
 
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